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5:09pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Cain Accuser Says She Complained Over A 'Series Of Unwanted Advances'

The attorney for one of the women who filed a sexual harassment complaint against Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain says the woman made a complaint in 1999 to the National Restaurant Association about "a series of inappropriate behaviors and unwanted advances from the CEO." At the time the CEO was Cain.

Attorney Joel Bennett said the woman did not want to go into the details of the incident, because it would be "extremely painful to do so."

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4:30pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Presidential Race

Lawyer For Cain Accuser Issues Statement

The lawyer for one of the women who have received settlements after filing sexual harassment complaints against GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain released a public statement. It rebuts Cain's statements that the claim was baseless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Tamara Keith for more.

4:18pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Generational Politics: Silents to Millennials

What's The Defining Moment Of Your Generation?

As a major new survey from Pew Research Center examines the generation gap in politics, we take a closer look at what, besides year of birth, differentiates one generation from the next. From the dawn of rock 'n' roll to the emergence of hip-hop, from "We Like Ike" to "Yes We Can," from a man on the moon to an iPhone in the pocket, here are some highlights from each of the four generations covered in the survey.

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4:12pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Around the Nation

MAP: TransCanada's Keystone Pipeline

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:26 pm

NPR

In 2010, TransCanada completed a major pipeline — the Keystone — which runs from Alberta to Illinois. The company is now planning a second line, called the Keystone XL, that would run from Alberta to Nebraska with an extension from Oklahoma to the refineries on the Gulf Coast.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:02pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Music Interviews

John Wesley Harding: The Musical Side Of A Split Personality

John Wesley Harding's latest album is called The Sound of His Own Voice.
Allison Michael Orenstein Courtesy of the artist

"When I first started making music, I took a fake name to disguise the fact I was going to embark on what was bound to be a short, unsatisfactory musical career," John Wesley Harding says. That was 23 years ago.

Harding recently launched a side career as a novelist, for which he uses his given name: Wesley Stace. But he's continued to release music under his alias, a name he shares with a 1967 Bob Dylan record. Speaking with Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon, Harding says he's learned to spread the wealth between his two creative personas.

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3:58pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Oregon Lawn-Chair Balloonist Will Take His Show To Bagdhad

Kent Couch made news back in 2008, when he tied a lawn chair to a cluster of helium balloons and flew it 235 miles from Oregon to Idaho. Yesterday, Couch boarded a plane and announced he was headed to Baghdad to attempt a similar trip with Iraqi extreme sports enthusiast Fareed Lafta.

Couch's story has been making the rounds in Oregon since Wednesday. But it's now beginning to make its way across the country. Here's how he describes his plans for Iraq on his website:

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3:54pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Marin Alsop on Music

Arthur Honegger's Joan Of Arc For The Ages

Actress Jean Seberg plays Joan of Arc in the 1957 Otto Preminger film Saint Joan.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

I became fascinated with Jeanne d'Arc Au Bûcher (Joan of Arc at the Stake) by Swiss-French composer Arthur Honegger many years ago, when I first heard a snippet of the piece on the radio. It was one of those arresting moments where I felt I'd heard the music before and couldn't place it for the life of me. As it turns out, I'd never heard it, but it's understandable why I thought I had.

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3:41pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Generational Politics: Silents to Millennials

Baby Boomers Remain Skeptical Of The Establishment

The baby boomers were born in the two decades after World War II and known for their anti-establishment liberalism in the 1960s. But their beginnings have not made them a predictable Democratic voting block. In 2008, boomers narrowly backed Barack Obama, but they swung over to Republicans in 2010.

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3:34pm

Fri November 4, 2011
'Darkhorse' Battalion And The Afghan War

For Wounded Marines, The Long, Hard Road Of Rehab

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:17 am

Lance Cpl. Jake Romo does physical therapy at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. He lost both legs in an explosion in Sangin, Afghanistan, in February 2011, while serving with the 3/5 Marines.
David Gilkey NPR

A year ago, nearly 1,000 U.S. Marine officers and enlisted men of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment deployed to restive Helmand province in southern Afghanistan. By the time their tour ended in April 2011, the Marines of the 3/5 — known as "Darkhorse" — suffered the highest casualty rate of any Marine unit during the past 10 years of war. This week, NPR tells the story of this unit's seven long months at war — both in Afghanistan and back home.

Sixth of seven parts

Jake Romo loved running.

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3:13pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Europe

G-20 Leaders Head Home With Euro Crisis Unresolved

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 7:03 pm

British Prime Minister David Cameron (left) speaks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Obama at the G-20 summit Friday in Cannes, France.
Chris Ratcliffe Getty Images

President Obama joked that the G-20 summit in Cannes, France, offered a crash course in European politics, with impromptu bargaining sessions that stretched late into the evening.

Yet the summit produced no big breakthroughs, only vague promises to prevent the political and economic turmoil in Greece from spreading.

After huddling with leaders from throughout the eurozone, Obama reiterated his belief that the countries on the continent can solve their own debt problems.

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3:06pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Picture Show

At 75, 'Life' Revisits Its First Cover Story

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:17 am

Alfred Eisenstaedt Life

Seventy-five years ago this month, Henry Luce, who had launched Time magazine in the 1920s, created his third great magazine: Life. Over the coming years it would come to be known as the weekly with the most and the best photographs. It would show Americans what war and peace looked like. There were photographs in Life of the Spanish Civil War and of V-J Day in Times Square that are rare cases for which the term "iconic" truly makes sense. And there were dozens of others, too.

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2:57pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Salt

Do People Pick Super-Sized Portions To Boost Their Social Status?

Denny's Beer Barrell in Clearfield, Penn. features a 15 pound burger for $39 that is free if the customer can finish it.
Jeff Swensen Getty Images

Choosing a Triple Whopper burger off the menu may say a lot more about feeling inadequate than it does about feeling hungry. In a new study, people chose jumbo portions of food and drink when they felt they lacked power and status.

If true, this data nugget could go a long way towards explaining why 32 percent of Americans are obese. Who doesn't have a day when they feel powerless and dissed? A Super Big Gulp or an extra-large pizza could seem like a quick, cheap fix.

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2:10pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Dippin' Dots, 'Ice Cream Of The Future,' Files For Bankruptcy Protection

Dippin' Dots.
Facebook.com/DippinDots

Don't panic if you're a fan of those tiny beads of ice cream. They're still going to be available.

But the cold, hard fact is that Dippin' Dots this week filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, according to WPSD-TV in Paducah, Ky., where the company that makes the so-called ice cream of the future is headquartered.

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1:58pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Election 2012

Differences Between Romney, Cain In Full View

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 7:03 pm

Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain arrives at a summit for the conservative Americans For Prosperity foundation in Washington on Friday. Days after sexual harassment allegations surfaced, he was greeted here with standing ovations.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Herman Cain and Mitt Romney, the two current front-runners in the Republican presidential race, spoke in Washington on Friday at a conference for the conservative group Americans for Prosperity.

Their speeches came as a new Washington Post-ABC poll found they're running almost even among Republican voters. And on Friday, the two candidates underscored the differences in their appeal to activists.

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1:54pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Public Health Innovators On The Silver Screen

Public health innovation gets its closeup.
Laila Abdul-Hadi Jadallah FastForward Health

For a peek at some fresh ideas in public health, I went to the movies.

Physicians, entrepreneurs, students, activists and at least one blogger gathered at the West End Cinema in Washington this week for the first FastForward Health public health film festival.

"We're at the cusp of innovation in public and community health," co-organizer Andre Blackman told the audience.

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1:47pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Justice Dept Drops Non-Disclosure Proposal For FOIA Requests

The United States Justice Department announced, yesterday, that it was dropping a proposed controversial rule that would allow it to deny the existence of sensitive documents requested under the Freedom of Information Act.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, a Republican from Iowa, sent a letter to the Justice Department about the rule and in a press release said the department had told him it was dropping plans to implement it. Grassley said:

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1:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Animals

A Researcher Asks: Are Dolphins Self-Aware?

Like chimpanzees, dolphins are large-brained and highly social animals, but can they recognize themselves in a mirror? Psychologist and dolphin researcher Diana Reiss discusses her work with dolphin communication and cognition.

1:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Space

Pondering the Possibility of Non-constant 'Constants'

What if the laws of physics aren't the same all over the universe, but vary from place to place? Michael Murphy of the Swinburne University of Technology discusses research published in the journal Physical Review Letters indicating that the value of one basic physical property, the fine structure constant, may vary with location in interstellar space.

1:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Animals

How An Elegant Moth Stays Aloft

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 1:37 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, host: Joining us now is Flora Lichtman, one of the, with...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FLATOW: How are you, Flora?

FLORA LICHTMAN: I'm pretty good. How are you?

FLATOW: I'm getting the mouth to work better. What do we got this week?

LICHTMAN: This week is pretty neat. We have footage, really beautiful, high-speed footage of a moth. And believe me, this is a moth like you have never seen it before. When I think of moths, I think of them bumping into lights and bumping into my screen door - clumsy.

FLATOW: Right, right.

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1:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Health

Mosquitoes Engineered To Kill Their Own Kind

Reporting in Nature Biotechnology, researchers write of genetically engineering mosquitoes to pass lethal genes to their offspring, in hopes of crashing populations of one dengue-transmitting species. Science writer Bijal Trivedi talks about recent tests of the bugs, and the concerns of critics.

1:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
History

In Scott's Race To The Pole, Science Beat Speed

A hundred years ago, two teams were racing to the South Pole. The Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen made it first, beating British explorer Robert Scott. But only Scott did pioneering science--and photography--along the way. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the achievements of the first Antarctic expeditions.

1:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
NPR Story

Peering Into The Brain, But At What?

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 1:26 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, host: This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Your thoughts, your memories, as you know, all come from your brain cells, billions of them packed together in your head. My next guest would like to make a map of how all those cells connect to one another, talk to each other, learn new things, make new memories.

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12:54pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Groupon: The Biggest Tech IPO Since Google

In its initial public offering, Groupon is selling about $700 million in stock. As The Wall Street Journal puts it that's "the biggest tech IPO of its kind since Google's stock-market debut."

If you're not familiar, Groupon is an Internet deals company. It for example, sells $50 worth of food at a restaurant for $25. It splits the profits with the restaurant on coupons redeemed and keeps the ones that customers don't use.

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12:37pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Europe

The Euro Crisis Puts Political Leaders At Risk

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou, shown speaking at the parliament in Athens on Friday, is facing a no-confidence vote.
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

George Papandreou is not the only European politician who is nervous about his job. Greek's prime minister wouldn't be the first leader to lose his position as a result of the ongoing euro crisis, and more are likely to follow.

Papandreou faces a vote of confidence on Friday, which could bring down his government. Even if he survives this test, he may not remain in power for long.

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12:33pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Salt

From Nebraska Lab To McDonald's Tray: The McRib's Strange Journey

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 4:40 pm

Fast food giant McDonald's has brought back the McRib until Nov. 14. The sandwich has gained cult acclaim over the past three decades because of its limited availability.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Since McDonald's announced the seasonal revival of its popular McRib sandwich last month, there's been a round of reports about what's in the sandwich that have ranged from glib (on its 70 ingredients) to McFib (on the alleged inhumane treatment of the pigs that

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12:31pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Asia

In Bangkok, Residents' Anger Rises With Floodwaters

In Bangkok, floodwaters are rising in some parts of the city, leading to charges that the government is sacrificing the homes and businesses of the poor while protecting the rich . On the west side of Bangkok (shown here Nov. 1), areas are mostly submerged, while the opposite side of the Chao Phraya river is dry.
Alexander Widding Landov

Heavy monsoon rains that began two months ago in Thailand have killed more than 400 people and show no sign of abating as the floodwaters make their way south into the crowded capital, Bangkok.

Anxious residents have stripped store shelves bare of water, rice and other essentials as they wait. And tempers are flaring as some poorer residents complain that their homes and businesses are being sacrificed to protect more affluent and industrial areas closer to the city center.

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12:20pm

Fri November 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords: 'I Will Return' To Congress

"I will get stronger. I will return" to Congress, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, (D-Ariz.), vows in a new book she has written with her husband about the devastating injuries she received last Jan. 8 when a gunman opened fire during an event she was hosting in Tucson.

It's one of the surest signs yet that she intends to remain in politics and seek re-election next year.

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12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Sports

Mark Emmert: NCAA Athletes Need Respect, Not Salaries

The National Collegiate Athletic Association plans to hold college teams to higher academic standards as part of its sweeping rule changes. The NCAA will also let students get 'cost of living' cash and scholarships on a multi-year basis. NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks with host Michel Martin about the new rules, and addresses criticisms surrounding student-athlete exploitation.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Faith Matters

Church Chants 'Ride For Christ's Sake'

At Freedom Biker Church, Sunday service is less about singing traditional hymns and more about listening to rock 'n' roll at a biker rally. Preacher Mike Beasley founded the church in 2006, and since then, the network has grown to 12 churches. He speaks with Michel Martin about his vision.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
From Our Listeners

Feedback On Teen Sex, Updates On Crack

Tell Me More editor Ammad Omar and host Michel Martin comb through listener feedback from a recent conversation about teen sex, social media and the law. They give updates on new guidelines for crack sentencing and real-life superhero Phoenix Jones. They also pay tribute to Motown music director George Rountree, who died Sunday.

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