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4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Egyptians Fear Arab Spring Progress Is Slipping Away

Steve Inskeep talks to best-selling Egyptian novelist and political activist Alaa Al Aswany about whether the Arab Spring gains are being eroded by Islamists and the military.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Pebble Mine Development Polarizes Alaska

In southwest Alaska, officials are counting votes on a controversial initiative to stop an open-pit copper and gold mine. If passed, the initiative could stop the developers from getting permits they need to start digging at Pebble Mine. The mine's location, near the spawning grounds for the largest sockeye salmon runs in the world, worries conservation groups, commercial fishermen and sport fishers. Daysha Eaton of member station KDLG reports.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Helps Dedicate Memorial To Martin Luther King Jr.

President Obama spoke at the long-delayed dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on Sunday. Almost 50 years after the March on Washington, Obama said, barricades and bigotry have come down. But the nation still faces severe economic challenges and too many neighborhoods with too little hope.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Reaching out to younger audiences, and perhaps just for some fun, the London Philharmonic is releasing the album "The Greatest Video Game Music." It's orchestral versions of well-known video game melodies. The album includes the theme song for Supermario.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Sports

Indy Champ Wheldon Dies In Vegas Speedway Crash

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The world of IndyCar racing has lost one of its stars. Two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dan Wheldon was killed yesterday during an IndyCar race in Las Vegas. Wheldon was trailing a pack of cars when he was unable to avoid a massive pile-up.

(SOUNDBITE OF BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Oh, here we go. (Unintelligible) a huge crash. Up at turn number two. Oh, multiple cars involved.

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4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Business

Business News

Ed Chan was president and chief executive of Walmart China for the last five years, overseeing the retailer's rapid expansion in the China market. Walmart says Chan's resignation, and the departure of another executive in China, are for personal reasons, and are not related to a food labeling scandal the company is facing right now.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Economy

Occupy Wall Street Protests Spread To Europe

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 6:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Cleanup is under way in cities around the world after a weekend of protests. Tens of thousands of people turned out. They protested greedy bankers, inept politicians, government austerity, the growing gap between rich and poor, and above all, the system that runs the global economy.

There was some violence in Rome, dozens of arrests. Other places were more peaceful. And in London on this Monday, the protests are still going on. So let's talk about that and more with NPR's Philip Reeves, who's on the line. Hi, Philip.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Election 2012

Financial Reports Shed Little Light On GOP Race

So far in the Republican presidential contest, the poll numbers have been continually changing, with candidates moving up and then down again. The primary dates are also in flux, with at least four states moving theirs up to January to try to influence the outcome. But there's another set of numbers to watch: the candidates' fundraising totals.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Politics

Times Have Changed Since Reagan's 1986 Tax Reform

The clock is ticking down on Capitol Hill as a congressional super committee has only until Thanksgiving to agree on a plan shrinking deficits by more than a trillion dollars. The entire Congress then has to pass it by Christmas Eve or face huge across-the-board spending cuts.

Twenty-five years ago, another politically-divided Congress approved the biggest tax code overhaul in the nation's history. But much has changed since then.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
The Salt

Look Who's Going Gluten-Free

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:25 am

French Laundry pastry chef Lena Kwak with the gluten-free flour she developed.

Sara Davis Thomas Keller Restaurant Group

Gluten-free isn't just for natural foodies anymore. It's gone mainstream. So much so, it's even been embraced by restaurateur Thomas Keller, one of the nation's top chefs (he's the only one with three Michelin stars for two restaurants).

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Africa

Misrata Militia Restricts Who May Enter Libyan City

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 11:15 am

A check point between Misrata and Beni Walid, Libya.

Lopez Jean Baptiste SIPA

Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi terrorized the Libyan city of Misrata during the civil war. Because it never fell, the city became an icon of the revolution. But Misrata now is gaining a reputation for a militia that is carrying out acts of vengeance, looting and restricting movements in and out of the city.

Wags now quip that a visa is needed to enter Misrata because of the tight restrictions on access to the large coastal city. But it's no joke to the people here.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Housing Market Stuck Despite Low Prices, Rates

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 10:32 am

A bank-owned sign is seen in front of a foreclosed home in Miami. Florida was among the hardest hit states in the real estate collapse.

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Three years ago, the real estate market was simple — simply terrible, that is. In virtually every part of the country, foreclosures were shooting up and prices were plunging. Today, the real estate picture is more nuanced. Foreclosures are still rising, but prices are stabilizing in some markets, making home-buying look more attractive.

If you had talked to some good economists just before the housing bubble burst, they would have told you it didn't make sense to buy a house.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Digital Life

Apps For Exercise, Eating And Sending Postcards

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:05 am

Six new apps — clockwise from top left, Chefs Feed, Anthill, Chewsy, Fitocracy, Postagram and RunKeeper — can help you exercise, find food, or just kill time.

NPR

Part of an occasional series on mobile apps.

Today's smartphones have applications that can help you track your latest jogging route — and find a place to eat afterward. And if you snap a nice picture along the way, they'll even let you use that to make a postcard.

Talking about the latest roundup of amazing apps, Slate's tech columnist Farhad Manjoo tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that as a new father, he's been trying out new apps as he sits awake with his young son in the middle of the night.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Barack Obama

Obama Bus Tour Rides Rough Political Terrain In N.C.

President Obama begins a campaign-style bus tour Monday in North Carolina and Virginia to try to drum up support for his jobs bill and his re-election campaign.

He starts in the Tar Heel State, which he won by a narrow margin in 2008 and where he now faces a struggle to stay competitive for 2012.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

For A Bilingual Writer, 'No One True Language'

Gustavo Perez Firmat is a Cuban-American who writes novels, memoirs, poetry, and academic works in both Spanish and English. "But I have the feeling that I'm not fluent in either one," he says. "Words fail me in both languages."

Perez Firmat, who is also a professor at Columbia University, says that being bilingual can be both a blessing and a burden.

"I don't have one true language," Perez Firmat tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Housing Recovery At Various Stages Around The U.S.

Realtor Lee Brown says Charlotte, N.C., has a whole community of "starter castles," which were built during the housing boom. One foreclosed home is expected to go for about half the value it was in 2007.

Michael Tomsic

The housing market may be getting more attractive for buying a home. Foreclosures continue to rise, but prices are stabilizing in some places across the country. Just as communities experienced the housing bubble differently, they are also feeling varying degrees of recovery.

Charlotte: 'Two Chandeliers In The Dining Room'

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Author Interviews

Whitehead's 'Zone' Is No Average Zombie Apocalypse

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:20 am

Colson Whitehead is also the author of The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt and Sag Harbor.

Erin Patrice O'Brien Doubleday

If you ask Colson Whitehead to describe the man at the center of his new novel, Zone One, he'll tell you: "It's about a guy just trying to make it to the next day without being killed — so it's about New Yorkers."

But character Mark Spitz isn't just any New Yorker. He's one of the only human survivors of a mysterious plague that has swept the world, turning billions of people into zombies. New York is devastated and Spitz is charged with clearing the undead from lower Manhattan.

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5:18pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Health

Breast Cancer: When Awareness Simply Isn't Enough

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 8:01 pm

Cam Newton #1 of the Carolina Panthers stretching as he wears pink for breast cancer awareness during their game at Bank of America Stadium in October.

Streeter Lecka Getty Images

It's October and one color dominates the landscape: pink, the color of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Breast cancer fundraising events dominate the month, from the massive Avon walks that take place in nine U.S. cities to the international Susan G. Komen Races for the Cure. Even the White House gets bathed in pink floodlights in recognition of the campaign.

But what if your breast cancer diagnosis doesn't make you want to wear pink socks, walk for the cure or be a "warrior in pink?"

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3:00pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Race

Preserving King's Legacy At His Spiritual Home

Martin Luther King Jr.'s spiritual is at the Ebnezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. King began preaching there when he was just 19. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rebecca Roberts talks with Reverend Raphael Warnock, current pastor of the historic church, who offers his insight into preserving King's legacy.

3:00pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Politics

GOP Money Gap Widens

Presidential candidates filed their latest campaign finance reports this weekend, showing a widening money gap in the Republican primary race. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry led the field.

3:00pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Arts & Life

Three-Minute Fiction

The winner of round seven of the Three-Minute Fiction contest will be announced in a few weeks. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rebecca Roberts introduces Darius Kroger by William Sirson from Laramie, Wyoming. More stories from the contest can be found at npr.org/threeminutefiction.

1:33pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Author Interviews

'The Breakfast Club' Meets Hell In 'Damned'

Meet Maddy Spencer — or, to be exact, Madison Desert Flower Rosa Parks Coyote Trickster Spencer — a ridiculous name she takes great pains to hide. She's 13, brainy, a little dumpy and very, very dead.

Maddy is the heroine of Fight Club author Chuck Palahniuk's new novel, Damned. It's a sort of coming-of-age tale, except that none of the characters can actually age. They're all dead and in Hell.

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1:30pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Music Interviews

William Shatner's Own Space Oddity

William Shatner.

williamshatner.com

He's been a starship captain, a Karamazov brother, a cop, a lawyer and a science-fiction author. Now, William Shatner returns to the recording studio for a new, space-themed spoken-word album, Seeking Major Tom.

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12:45pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Education

'The Learning': Foreign Teachers, U.S. Classrooms

Grace Amper came to the United States to teach in Baltimore. She had to leave her son Gadiel and husband Jojo Gonzales behind in the Philippines for the first year.

Paul Flinton Ramona Diaz

When the United States took control of the Philippines at the turn of the 19th century, one of the first things the U.S. did was send in American teachers. The goal was to establish a public school system and turn the Philippines into an English-speaking country.

It worked so well that two centuries later, American schools started traveling to the Philippines to recruit teachers to come here.

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12:14pm

Sun October 16, 2011
Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.

At Memorial, King's Legacy Remembered

Thousands attended the formal dedication Sunday of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the National Mall – an emotional day for those, including President Obama, who came to honor the slain civil rights leader.

As the choir from King's home church in Atlanta took the stage, people streamed into the park, just west of the King Memorial, carrying chairs, cardboard boxes to sit on, and their children. There were tears on the faces of some in the rainbow crowd, and big smiles on others such as Edna Smith Hector, who said she was proud to be there.

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9:07am

Sun October 16, 2011
The News Tip On Weekend Edition Sunday

The News Tip: Hold On To Your Credibility

The News Corp. headquarters in New York City. The top executive of News Corp.'s Wall Street Journal Europe has resigned over accusations that the paper was involved in a scheme to inflate its circulation numbers.

Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

News Corp. shareholders have their annual meeting Friday, and they have received outside advice to oust the media titan behind the company, Rupert Murdoch, and his son.

Murdoch is still ducking the fallout from a summer-long scandal with his newspapers on the other side of the pond. The scandal claimed the News of the World tabloid, closed down after outrage over phone hacking by its reporters.

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8:29am

Sun October 16, 2011
Around the Nation

A March For Jobs In Martin Luther King's Name

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 12:53 pm

Demonstrators rally under the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

Jose Luis Magana AP

Emerging from the shadow of the Washington Monument, civil rights groups marched to the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on Saturday.

The rally, a rainbow crowd dominated by African-Americans, marched for jobs and economic justice on the eve of the new memorial's dedication.

Activist Rev. Al Sharpton said his National Action Network organized the march because the nation has ignored the plight of the chronically unemployed and because lawmakers haven't passed President Obama's jobs bill.

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8:00am

Sun October 16, 2011
Middle East

Prisoner Swap Undercuts Palestinian Authority

The release of more than 1000 Palestinian prisoners in exchange for kidnapped Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit is being trumpeted as a major victory by the Islamist Hamas faction that has held Shalit for five years. The boost for Hamas has sidelined the Palestinian Authority and President Mahmoud Abbas, who was just recently feted for his efforts to win Palestinian statehood recognition from the UN. The political shift leaves Palestinian supporters of a two-state solution feeling isolated. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

8:00am

Sun October 16, 2011
Economy

Jobs, Wealth And The Racial Gap

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 11:41 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Roland Fryer studies economic disparities and race in America as an economics professor at Harvard University. Fryer is the recent winner of the MacArthur genius fellowship and he joins us from Concord, Massachusetts.

Roland, welcome to the program.

PROFESSOR ROLAND FRYER: Oh, thanks for having me.

CORNISH: How deep are the disparities between whites and other groups - blacks and Hispanics - when it comes to jobs and when it comes to wealth?

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8:00am

Sun October 16, 2011
Afghanistan

After The Surge, The Fight For Kandahar Goes On

Last year's U.S. troops surge in southern Afghanistan was aimed at ousting the Taliban from much of its home turf. So what does Kandahar province look like today? NPR's Quil Lawrence spent a week in the region and shares his impressions with host Audie Cornish.

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