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1:59pm

Mon September 26, 2011
It's All Politics

Flashback: Herman Cain's 1994 Bill Clinton Debate On Health Care

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 11:34 am

Herman Cain, who won the Florida Republican presidential straw poll over the weekend, is no newbie when it comes to showing up career politicians. Texas Gov. Rick Perry was just the latest one to be Hermanized by the former Godfather's pizza company executive.

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1:55pm

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Two Tibetan Monks Set Themselves On Fire In China

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 2:20 pm

Exile Tibetan monks hold a candle light vigil in Dharmsala, India, as they react to news reports of self-immolation by two Tibetan monks at the Kirti Monastery in Sichuan province's Aba prefectuture, China.
Ashwini Bhatia AP

Right after they waved the banned Tibetan flag and said "long live the Dalai Lama," two Tibetan monks set themselves on fire to protest the Chinese government's strict control of their religion.

The Free Tibet Campaign says that over the past six months, four monks have chosen self-immolation in Tibet.

"This shows not only the level of suffering and desperation of Tibetans but also the extreme actions they are willing to take to draw the world's attention to the situation in Tibet," they write.

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1:40pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Asia

From Progress To Problem: China's High-Speed Trains

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 8:17 pm

Workers clear the wreckage of a July 23 high-speed-train collision in Wenzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang province. The crash killed 40 people and raised questions about the safety of the country's high-speed-rail network, which the Chinese government has held up as an example of its technological prowess and with which it had hoped to attract overseas buyers.
STR AFP/Getty Images

China's high-speed trains were supposed to be a gleaming testament to the country's progress and modernity. Instead, a recent crash that killed 40 people has come to symbolize much that's wrong with China's warp-speed development. In particular, a "Great Leap Forward" mentality toward development is clashing with questions of safety.

The notion that fatal accidents are the price of progress seems to have trickled down to some of the passengers on a recent high-speed train journey between Beijing and Nanjing, many of whom characterized the accident as "normal."

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1:18pm

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Despite Arrests, Wall Street Protesters Vow To Continue

A demonstrator holds up a sign in front of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City. Hundreds of activists affiliated with the "Occupy Wall Street" demonstrations have begun living in a park in the Financial District near Wall Street.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

For more than a week, a group of protesters have been encamped at New York City's Zuccotti Park. They're part of a protest they've termed "Occupy Wall Street." While the group was intent on making a point about what they say is Wall Street's "greed and corruption," much of the media focus has been about the scattered nature of the movement.

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1:15pm

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

GOP Students' Race-Based Bake Sale Sparks Controversy At Berkeley

Row of brightly-colored cupcakes.
iStockphoto.com

Republican students at the University of California, Berkeley, say they're being satirical. The school's student senate says they're being discriminatory and others on campus say they're being offensive.

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1:06pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Music Reviews

Wilco's New Album: Love The 'Whole' Thing

Wilco, from left: Mikael Jorgensen, Glenn Kotche, Patrick Sansone, Jeff Tweedy, John Stirratt, Nels Cline.
Zoran Orlic

Usually, the whispers start after rock groups have been around for a while, as die-hard fans begin to worry about their beloved band getting stale. Despite its incredibly long run, Wilco has escaped that fate, and managed to stay fresh since 1994. It just released its eighth studio album in 17 years, and the first issued on Wilco's own dBpm Records label. The Whole Love represents a new peak for the critically acclaimed sextet.

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1:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
NPR Story

As Drones Evolve, More Countries Want Their Own

The Obama Administration has dramatically ramped up its use of drones as military and foreign policy tools. But many other countries want drones of their own, and advances in technology will soon allow for smaller, more powerful and cheaper models.

1:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
NPR Story

Op-Ed: Reporter On Why She Watched Troy Davis Die

Crime reporter Rhonda Cook watched the Troy Davis execution, just one of dozens she has witnessed. The media are the eyes of the public, she says, and have a responsibility to report it if something goes wrong.

1:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
NPR Story

Remembering Nobel Prize Winner Wangari Maathai

Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, died of cancer Sunday at the age of 71. Maathai inspired a generation of women and founded Kenya's Green Belt Movement, which targets deforestation, poverty and the status of women.

1:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
NPR Story

Being 'New Kids' From Abroad Poses Unique Challenges

High school is tough for almost every kid. But for new immigrants and refugees, it can be even harder to navigate American teen life. In The New Kids, Brooke Hauser chronicles the lives of students enrolled in Brooklyn's International High School.

12:30pm

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

VIDEO: 'Bird Man' Jeb Corliss Flies Through A Mountain In China

The view from Jeb Corliss' headcam as he flew toward the hole in Tianmen mountain on Saturday.
CCTV News Channel

There are several videos out there of wingsuit flyer Jeb Corliss' latest adventure, but the most complete report with the best bird's eye view may be this one from China's CCTV. Check it out.

The BBC says Corliss jumped out of a helicopter from 6,560 feet above Tianmen mountain in Hunan Province on Saturday before flying through the gap.

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12:15pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Pakistan Polio Spreading To China

The first confirmed reports of polio in China since 1999 have cropped up in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (in red).
Wikimedia Commons

There's word from the World Health Organization that wild poliovirus type 1 has appeared in 10 children in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region of China this month.

The viral strains isolated from these children were genetically linked to virus currently circulating in Pakistan, the WHO says.

They're the first confirmed cases of polio identified in China since 1999, according to WHO.

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12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Education

No Child Left Behind: 'Revolutionary,' Controversial Idea

President Obama recently announced big changes to the Bush-era education law. Steve Perry, principal of Capital Preparatory Magnet School in Hartford, Connecticut, says the law is still a good idea, and it made his teachers pay attention to all students. Author Peg Tyre says the law focused the nation on the achievement gap but turned many schools into "test prep factories." Both speak with guest host Jacki Lyden.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
History

37 Years And Halfway Through Encyclopaedia Iranica

In 1974, Columbia University Professor Ehsan Yarshater began a comprehensive encyclopedia of Iranian history. Now, he's 91 years old and at the letter 'K.' Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the project's scope and significance with Yarshater and contributor Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak, director of the Roshan Center for Persian Studies at the University of Maryland.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Berenstain Bears Reconnect Indians to Native Language

After teaching children life lessons for nearly five decades through their books and recent TV series, the bears are now helping revive the American Indian tribal language of Lakota. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses Lakota with Sunshine Archambault-Carlow of the Standing Rock Sioux, a reservation in North and South Dakota.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Remembrances

First African Nobel Peace Prize Winner Dies

After a long battle with cancer, Wangari Maathai died at age 71. As one of Kenya's most recognizable female figures, she won the Nobel in 2004 for combining environmentalism and social activism. She spent over 30 years mobilizing women to plant 30 million trees in the Green Belt Movement.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Education

For States, More Flexibility In Education Policies

Many public school systems chafed under No Child Left Behind, the Bush-era law requiring states to closely monitor student achievement and conduct more regular testing. President Obama announced Friday that states can now qualify for exemptions from some of the law's key requirements. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the changes with Education Week Staff Writer Alyson Klein.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Behind Closed Doors

The Illicit, Perilous World Of 'Pumping'

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is launching a public safety campaign Monday. It follows many cases of procedures gone wrong at the hands of unqualified surgeons, including 'pumpers' who illegally inject industrial-grade silicone into patients. The practice leads to dire health problems, even death. Guest host Jacki Lyden learns more with Laura Rena Murray, who recently reported this issue for the New York Times, and Dr. Malcolm Roth, the new president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

11:55am

Mon September 26, 2011
It's All Politics

Obama' 'Stop Complaining' Order To Black Caucus Causes Stir

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 2:25 pm

President Obama addresses a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation dinner, Sept. 24, 2011.
NICHOLAS KAMM AFP/Getty Images

President Obama may have fired up some of the most loyal voters in his political base, African Americans, through a speech to the Congressional Black Caucus, though not in the way he intended.

After running down a list of his administration's accomplishments on behalf of middle and lower income Americans and calling for passage of his jobs bill, Obama concluded his speech by saying:

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11:36am

Mon September 26, 2011
Iraq

The Greedy Battle For Iraq's 'Hearts And Minds'

Peter Van Buren has contributed to The Nation, American Conservative Magazine, and The Huffington Post.
Torie Partridge courtesy of the author

For years federal auditors have reported that millions of American dollars have been wasted or are unaccounted for in the effort to rebuild and stabilize Iraq.

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11:20am

Mon September 26, 2011
All Tech Considered

Few Consumers Are Cracking The QR Code

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 12:14 pm

Manuel Martinez, the manager of a popular salad restaurant in Washington, D.C., called Sweetgreen, assists a customer. Martinez says customers use the QR code on the wall to learn about promotions and to get discounts.
Mallory Benedict NPR

If you drive by billboards or flip through magazines from time to time, you may have noticed pixelated squares popping up all over the place. These aren't scrambled checkerboards or alien landing pads, but QR codes, short for quick response codes.

The codes are scanned with a smartphone camera, kind of like one might scan a bar code, and marketing departments all over the country are coming up with clever ways to use them.

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10:57am

Mon September 26, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Growth Of Children's Hospitals Raises Adult-Size Questions

Construction at the new Nemours Children's Hospital, at the medical city at Lake Nona, Fla., in late 2010.
Joe Burbank Orlando Sentinel

Many children's hospitals started out humbly, like Children's Hospital Boston, which began with 20 beds in a row house shortly after the Civil War.

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10:45am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

More People Than Ever Are Unhappy With The Government, Poll Shows

Gallup's latest polling on how Americans feel about the way they're being governed.
Gallup.com

In some ways this news just states the obvious. But it's still worth noting that according to the pollsters at Gallup:

"A record-high 81 percent of Americans are dissatisfied with the way the country is being governed, adding to negativity that has been building over the past 10 years."

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10:34am

Mon September 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Living People To Appear On Stamps For First Time

The Postal Service rule had been that a person had to have been dead for at least five years before being eligible to appear on a stamp.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

For the first time, living people will be eligible to be honored on U.S. postage stamps.

The U.S. Postal Service announced Monday that it is ending its longstanding rule that people cannot be featured on stamps while they're still living. It's inviting suggestions from the public on who should get the first stamp.

"This change will enable us to pay tribute to individuals for their achievements while they are still alive to enjoy the honor," Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said in a statement.

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10:20am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Creator Of Doritos To Be Buried With His Chips

Word is just reaching the rest of the nation that Arch West, the man credited with creating Doritos, died last week in Texas. He was 97, the Dallas Morning News says.

At a graveside service next Saturday, the newspaper adds, "his family plans to sprinkle Doritos." A daughter says they will be "tossing Doritos chips in before they put the dirt over the urn."

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10:10am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Sales Of New Homes Fell 2.3 Percent In August

Sales of new single-family houses fell 2.3 percent in August from July, the Census Bureau and Department of Housing and Urban Development just reported. The annualized rate: 295,000 sales.

The report underscores the weakness of the housing market, The Associated Press says. Sales have now fallen four straight months and are at a six-month low. Economists, according to the AP, say the pace needs to be about 700,000 "to sustain a healthy housing market."

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10:02am

Mon September 26, 2011
Economy

As Puerto Rican Economy Lags, Some Question Cuts

Plaza del Mercado is a lively gathering place in Rio Piedras. But many shops have closed because of the struggling economy.
Greg Allen NPR

With its white sand beaches and tropical weather, for visitors, Puerto Rico is close to paradise. But for those who live there, the past decade has been difficult. For most of that time, Puerto Rico has been in a recession.

To see Puerto Rico's economy up close, a good place to start is Rio Piedras. It's a former suburb, now a bustling neighborhood in Puerto Rico's capital, San Juan.

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8:55am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Marathon Record Lowered By 21 Seconds

Patrick Makau of Kenya celebrates in front of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate after setting a new world record for the marathon.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Kenya's Patrick Makau ran the Berlin Marathon on Sunday in a new world record time — 2 hours, 3 minutes and 38 seconds. He shaved 21 seconds off the previous record, set by Ethiopia's Haile Gebrselassie on the same course in 2008.

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8:15am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Top Stories: Shutdown Showdown; CIA Station Attacked In Kabul

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 8:17 am

Good morning.

Our headlines so far today:

-- Shutdown Showdown Continues: Senate Has Key Vote Today

-- NYPD Could 'Take Down A Plane' If Necessary, Commissioner Says

Other stories making headlines include:

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8:00am

Mon September 26, 2011
Afghanistan

'Rags To Riches': America's Man In Kandahar

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 5:00 am

Gen. Abdul Raziq is the acting police chief of Afghanistan's Kandahar province. Just 33 years old, he's a former warlord on whom the United States relied during its 2010 "surge" operation. But Raziq is also accused of brutal abuses of power, even massacring his tribal rivals, according to a new article in The Atlantic.

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