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10:09am

Fri September 23, 2011
Health Care

Bartering For Health Care: Yardwork For Treatment

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 9:02 am

True North Health Center in Falmouth, Maine, accepts "time dollars," in addition to real dollars. Patients perform services in the community, like raking leaves, to earn the currency, and they can spend it for care at True North.
iStockphoto.com

Deb Barth is raking leaves for Lesley Jones. But Barth isn't earning money for her yardwork, at least not in physical currency. She's earning "time dollars" — for every two hours she spends doing odd jobs, she'll earn a free visit with her doctor.

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10:06am

Fri September 23, 2011
Economy

A Greek Default Would Spread Debt Contagion

European leaders insist they will take all necessary measures to ensure Greece does not default on its debt. A default would throw Greece's economy — and the European banking system — into deeper crisis. But many financial experts are advocating an orderly default. They argue it will be painful but preferable to round-after-round of painful austerity measures and more uncertainty.

9:50am

Fri September 23, 2011
The Two-Way

No More Special Last Meals For Death Row Inmates In Texas

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 9:53 am

Lawrence Russell Brewer in 1999.
Pat Sullivan AP

The huge meal that white supremacist Lawrence Russell Brewer ordered and then left untouched before his execution Wednesday has convinced Texas officials to end the state's traditional practice of giving death row inmates a "last meal" of their choice.

As the Houston Chronicle writes:

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9:10am

Fri September 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Those Muffins Did Not Cost $16 Each, Hilton Says

Kevin D. Weeks for NPR

Half-baked.

That's what you might say about one much-reported part of the much-discussed report this week that the Justice Department bought some very expensive food for its conferences in recent years.

Hilton Worldwide says the muffins it provided for a 2009 Justice conference in Washington did not cost $16 each, as was reported by Justice's inspector general.

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8:45am

Fri September 23, 2011

8:22am

Fri September 23, 2011
The Two-Way

From Pakistan: 'Vehement Denials' And Indignation After U.S. Accusations

There are "vehement denials and also ... a good degree of indignation" from Pakistan today, Los Angeles Times correspondent Alex Rodriguez tells NPR from Islamabad. Officials there are responding to comments from the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff — who said Thursday that "extremist organizations serving as proxies of the government of Pakistan are attacking Afghan troops and civilians as well as U.S. soldiers."

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8:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Boos Heard At GOP Debate After Gay Soldier Asks About 'Don't Ask'

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum during Thursday night's Republican presidential debate in Orlando.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Read and listen to the reaction from some in the audience at last night's Republican presidential debate after a video question from Stephen Hill, a gay soldier who Fox News said is serving in Iraq. The question was directed to former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, and here is Fox News' transcript:

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7:47am

Fri September 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Hilton Denies It Overcharged DOJ For Muffins

Hilton Worldwide hosted a legal training conference for the Justice Department. News reports cited the department's inspector general saying Hilton billed the government $16 for each muffin. The company says its receipts were misinterpreted. Hilton says the price included fruit, a drink, tax and tips.

7:41am

Fri September 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Volunteers In Indianapolis Gear Up For Super Bowl

Two thousand volunteers showed up for training recently. When the Super Bowl comes to Indianapolis, volunteeers will greet fans at the airport or give directions. The city's team, however, may not make it to the big game. The Colts are 0-2 so far this season.

7:33am

Fri September 23, 2011
Asia

Pakistan Deals With Flooding, Terrorism Accusations

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 7:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And let's go next to Pakistan, the scene of both a natural disaster and political turmoil. And we'll talk about the disaster first. NPR's Julie McCarthy is on the line from a flood zone in southern Pakistan. Julie, hi. Where are you?

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7:25am

Fri September 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Saleh Returns And For Yemen, 'Next 24 Hours Will Be Decisive'

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 7:49 am

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Riyadh on Sept. 19, 2011.
AFP/Getty Images

More than three months after being seriously injured in a rocket attack and then going to Saudi Arabia for treatment, President Ali Abdullah Saleh made a surprise return to Yemen today.

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6:53am

Fri September 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Marines React To Buddy 'Coming Out' On The Radio

Earlier this week, Marine Major Darrel Choat revealed on Morning Edition that he is gay. Choat made the statement on the day that "don't ask, don't tell" was formally repealed. That law had banned gays from serving openly in the military. Steve Inskeep checks back in with Choat to hear how those he serves with reacted to the news.

6:42am

Fri September 23, 2011
Asia

Pakistan Responds To Sharp Accusation From U.S.

Pakistan lashed out at the U.S. for accusing the country's most powerful intelligence agency of supporting extremist attacks against American targets in Afghanistan. Steve Inskeep talks to Alex Rodriguez, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, about what Pakistan had to say.

6:28am

Fri September 23, 2011
Games & Humor

Video Game Simulates War Correspondent Tasks

A video game being developed lets you in on what it's like to be a war correspondent. It's called Warco. Instead of carrying guns and weapons, players in this war game carry a video camera.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Detractors: Indiana Voucher System Promotes Religion

Indiana's new voucher program allows families with incomes up to $62,000 to take a portion of the funds that would have gone to a public school and convert it into a scholarship that can be used at a private school. The program has brought an enrollment rush at Catholic schools. Opponents fear the vouchers could siphon money away from public schools, and uses state funds to offer religious education.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

'Moneyball' Revolutionizes How Baseball Is Played

The new film Moneyball opens in theaters this weekend. It is a rare sports movie that deals with more than wins and losses. It follows the entertaining, real-life quest of a sports revolutionary who wanted to rethink how baseball is played.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Wounded President Returns To Yemen After Treatment

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh today returned to the country after more than three months in Saudi Arabia for medical treatment. He had left Yemen after being seriously injured in an attack. The country has faced turmoil in recent months as anti-government demonstrators called for the ouster of Saleh. For more on this development, Steve Inskeep speaks with journalist Tom Finn, who's in Sanaa.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

MacArthur Grant Will Help Fight Elder Abuse

After a career devoted to combating the largely hidden but widespread problem of elder abuse, Marie Therese Connolly has been recognized by the MacArthur Foundation for a so-called 'genius' grant. She tells Morning Edition's David Greene that the recognition will have a huge impact on her work.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Romney, Perry Dominate GOP Presidential Debate

Even though there were nine contenders, Mitt Romney and Rick Perry were the highlights of much of Thursday night's GOP presidential debate in Orlando, Fla. The two leading candidates had a chance to attack each others positions on social security, health care and immigration.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Data Show Housing Market Starting To Brighten

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP: On a Friday morning, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

One piece of positive economic news has emerged in an otherwise anxious week. The National Association of Realtors says sales of existing homes rose almost 19 percent over August of last year. It's more than what was expected, although it stops short of a real turn around, as NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

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4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Obama To Waive Parts Of Bush-Era Education Act

The White House is announcing Friday that it will grant waivers to states that cannot meet the testing standards of the No Child Left Behind education law. But states will face strict scrutiny from Washington before they get these waivers.

2:32am

Fri September 23, 2011
It's All Politics

Romney Ensures Perry Has Long, Hard Night At Orlando GOP Debate

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 9:28 am

Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, makes a point as Texas Gov. Rick Perry listens, during a debate in Orlando, Fla.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

Accepting the premise that the race for the Republican presidential nomination has come down to a two-man contest between the frontrunner Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Mitt Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, the question is which of those two candidates helped himself the most in Thursday evening's debate in Orlando, Fla.?

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12:01am

Fri September 23, 2011
StoryCorps

Soul Singer Helps Shoeshiner 'Get On The Good Foot'

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 8:30 am

Earl B. Reynolds spoke with his daughter, Ashley Reynolds, in Roanoke, Va., about how a chance encounter with singer James Brown helped prod him into a new plan for his life.
StoryCorps

Earl B. Reynolds Jr., 60, grew up in Roanoke, Va., where his father cut hair in his own store, the Virginia Sanitary Barber Shop. And as a little boy, Earl often shined customers' shoes in the shop.

As Reynolds tells his daughter, Ashley Reynolds, a visit from the Godfather of Soul set him on a path in life that eventually put Earl at odds with his father.

Working in the store one day, Earl watched a tour bus pull up to a theater near the shop. The doors opened — and out stepped James Brown.

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12:01am

Fri September 23, 2011
Politics

Obama's Jobs Bill Pitch: A Bridge To Nowhere?

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 11:16 am

President Obama on Thursday visited the Brent Spence Bridge, which has been called "functionally obsolete." The president pressed Congress to pass his jobs act, arguing that if the country doesn't invest in restoring the bridge and other infrastructure now, it will pay for it later.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

President Obama continued his tour in support of his jobs bill Thursday. The latest stop: Cincinnati, at the base of the double-decker Brent Spence Bridge.

The bridge sits on one of the busiest trucking routes in the country, and it's considered functionally obsolete.

Gerardo Claudio lives in Augusta, Ga., and works all over the U.S. He spends about three weeks on the road every month, which gives him a good look at the nation's infrastructure.

"The roads are in real, real awful condition, should I say," says Claudio, who was in Cincinnati on Thursday.

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12:01am

Fri September 23, 2011
Europe

Europe's Debt Crisis Casts Cloud Over U.S. Economy

U.S Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner (left) speaks to French Finance Minister Francois Baroin (right) during talks in Marseille earlier this month. The U.S. is increasingly concerned that the European debt crisis will have an impact on the U.S. economy.
Lionel Cironneau AP

With all the worry over the ailing U.S. economy, Europe's debt crisis may have seemed a long way off.

But not anymore. The faint tinkle of alarm bells a few months ago are now clanging loudly. What began as a crisis in smaller countries, like Greece, Portugal and Ireland, is now creating serious issues in much larger economies like Italy, France and Germany.

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12:01am

Fri September 23, 2011
Business

High Costs Make It Harder To Grow Young Farmers

Austin Bruns stands on land owned by a contractor for Monsanto, an agriculture corporation. Bruns helps with seed corn production there, and also rents 150 acres elsewhere.
Clay Masters for NPR

In farm country, business is still booming. Commodity prices remain high, and investors are funneling millions of dollars into buying farmland, making it quite enticing for the would-be farmer who wants to leave the rat race.

But surprisingly, these factors make it that much harder for the next generation of farmers to secure the financing they need to get on the tractor.

A High Cost To Start Out

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12:01am

Fri September 23, 2011
Television

As 'All My Children' Ends, Susan Lucci Says Goodbye

Susan Lucci's character, Erica Kane, has served time for kidnapping, been accused of murder and cheated on her fifth and sixth husband, Travis, with his brother, Jackson — who later became Kane's 10th husband.
Ron Tom ABC

Susan Lucci is the most famous actress in daytime drama, but her reign comes to an end on Friday, when her soap — ABC's All My Children — broadcasts its final episode.

Fans have been following the drama of Pine Valley — the fictitious Philadelphia suburb where the show takes place — since 1970, and much of that drama has revolved around Lucci's character, Erica Kane.

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12:01am

Fri September 23, 2011
Politics

A Foe Of Big Government Seeks Aid For Joplin

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 2:07 pm

Rep. Billy Long talks with President Obama after arriving in Joplin, Mo., to visit tornado victims. The Tea Party freshman has faced criticism over his efforts to get federal aid for his Missouri district, which includes Joplin.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Billy Long is a Tea Party stalwart who ran for Congress as a man fed up with Washington.

Long won in a landslide and now represents Joplin, Mo., where he fired up a Tea Party crowd in April pretending to auction off the national debt.

Five weeks later, Long was back in Joplin, this time in the dark and rain, surveying the aftermath of an apocalyptic tornado. And this time, the federal government was his friend.

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6:54pm

Thu September 22, 2011
The Two-Way

Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Gene Cernan Urge U.S. To Bring Back Shuttles

Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of Apollo 11, testifies before the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee about human space flight.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The first and last men to walk on the moon told a congressional committee today that the United States needs to figure out a way to get back into space.

Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, told the House Science, Space and Technology Committee that NASA needs a "master plan" to get Americans back in space.

Since the space shuttle program was grounded earlier this year, the only way for American astronauts to get into low Earth orbit or to the International Space Station is to hitch a ride with the Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

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