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10:34am

Mon September 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Living People To Appear On Stamps For First Time

The Postal Service rule had been that a person had to have been dead for at least five years before being eligible to appear on a stamp.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

For the first time, living people will be eligible to be honored on U.S. postage stamps.

The U.S. Postal Service announced Monday that it is ending its longstanding rule that people cannot be featured on stamps while they're still living. It's inviting suggestions from the public on who should get the first stamp.

"This change will enable us to pay tribute to individuals for their achievements while they are still alive to enjoy the honor," Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said in a statement.

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10:20am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Creator Of Doritos To Be Buried With His Chips

Word is just reaching the rest of the nation that Arch West, the man credited with creating Doritos, died last week in Texas. He was 97, the Dallas Morning News says.

At a graveside service next Saturday, the newspaper adds, "his family plans to sprinkle Doritos." A daughter says they will be "tossing Doritos chips in before they put the dirt over the urn."

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10:10am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Sales Of New Homes Fell 2.3 Percent In August

Sales of new single-family houses fell 2.3 percent in August from July, the Census Bureau and Department of Housing and Urban Development just reported. The annualized rate: 295,000 sales.

The report underscores the weakness of the housing market, The Associated Press says. Sales have now fallen four straight months and are at a six-month low. Economists, according to the AP, say the pace needs to be about 700,000 "to sustain a healthy housing market."

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10:02am

Mon September 26, 2011
Economy

As Puerto Rican Economy Lags, Some Question Cuts

Plaza del Mercado is a lively gathering place in Rio Piedras. But many shops have closed because of the struggling economy.
Greg Allen NPR

With its white sand beaches and tropical weather, for visitors, Puerto Rico is close to paradise. But for those who live there, the past decade has been difficult. For most of that time, Puerto Rico has been in a recession.

To see Puerto Rico's economy up close, a good place to start is Rio Piedras. It's a former suburb, now a bustling neighborhood in Puerto Rico's capital, San Juan.

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8:55am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Marathon Record Lowered By 21 Seconds

Patrick Makau of Kenya celebrates in front of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate after setting a new world record for the marathon.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Kenya's Patrick Makau ran the Berlin Marathon on Sunday in a new world record time — 2 hours, 3 minutes and 38 seconds. He shaved 21 seconds off the previous record, set by Ethiopia's Haile Gebrselassie on the same course in 2008.

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8:15am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Top Stories: Shutdown Showdown; CIA Station Attacked In Kabul

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 8:17 am

Good morning.

Our headlines so far today:

-- Shutdown Showdown Continues: Senate Has Key Vote Today

-- NYPD Could 'Take Down A Plane' If Necessary, Commissioner Says

Other stories making headlines include:

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8:00am

Mon September 26, 2011
Afghanistan

'Rags To Riches': America's Man In Kandahar

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 5:00 am

Gen. Abdul Raziq is the acting police chief of Afghanistan's Kandahar province. Just 33 years old, he's a former warlord on whom the United States relied during its 2010 "surge" operation. But Raziq is also accused of brutal abuses of power, even massacring his tribal rivals, according to a new article in The Atlantic.

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7:45am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

NYPD Could 'Take Down A Plane' If Necessary, Commissioner Says

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 7:49 am

A plane flies past the Manhattan skyline at sunset.
Clive Brunskill Getty Images

One exchange in particular between CBS News' Scott Pelley and New York Police Department Commissioner Ray Kelly on Sunday's edition of 60 Minutes is getting lots of attention today.

The subject was the possibility of another terrorist attack aimed at the city and the efforts by Kelly's department to prevent such a thing from happening. Here's an excerpt:

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7:25am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Shutdown Showdown Continues: Senate Has Key Vote Today

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 12:58 pm

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) at the Capitol last week.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

We warned last week that a second "shutdown showdown" was looming in Washington.

And, sure enough, as the new week begins lawmakers in Washington are still at odds over how to put some more money into the coffers of the stretched-thin Federal Emergency Management Agency. And if the dispute isn't settled by the end of the week, part of the federal government might be forced to shut down.

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7:03am

Mon September 26, 2011
Afghanistan

American Killed In Attack On CIA Office In Kabul

An Afghan employed by the U.S. government killed one American and wounded another in an attack on a CIA office in Kabul, officials said Monday.

Sunday's shooting is the latest in a growing number of attacks this year by Afghans working for international forces. Some assailants have turned out to be Taliban sleeper agents, while others have been motivated by private grievances.

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5:02am

Mon September 26, 2011
World

Turkey's Erdogan Blasts Syria, Israel

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been generating international attention recently with sharp criticism of three countries that have had close relations with his country: Israel, Syria and the United States.

In an interview with Morning Edition's David Greene, Erdogan said the Syrians have a right to determine their future. Instead of bringing about reforms, President Bashar Assad has been "turning guns toward his own people."

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5:00am

Mon September 26, 2011
Afghanistan

Afghan Women Fight Back, Preserve Shelters

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 10:09 am

Sakina sits with her 18-month-old son, Shafiq, at a women's shelter in Bamiyan, in central Afghanistan, last October. Sakina spent seven months in prison for leaving a forced marriage. The Afghan government recently backed down from a plan to take control of women's shelters, and women's groups are hailing it as a victory.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

In Afghanistan, women's groups are claiming a rare victory.

Last winter, the government was planning to bring battered women's shelters under government control.

Women's rights advocates sprang into action, complaining that the new rules would turn shelters into virtual prisons for women who had run away from home because of abuse. But after a flurry of media attention, the Afghan government agreed to re-examine the issue. And this month, President Hamid Karzai's Cabinet quietly approved a new draft that has support from women's groups.

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4:58am

Mon September 26, 2011
Middle East

In Egypt, Mubarak-Era Emergency Law To Stay

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 9:54 am

Egyptian demonstrators protest against the emergency law in front of the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Friday. The country's military rulers announced last week that the Hosni Mubarak-era measure would remain in effect until at least next June.
Khalil Hamra AP

Egypt's military rulers announced that a decades-old emergency law curtailing civil rights will continue until at least next June.

Ending the controversial law was a key demand of Egyptian protesters who forced former President Hosni Mubarak from power in February. But the military, which planned to lift the emergency law before parliamentary elections scheduled in November, said last week it had no choice but to employ the draconian measure after a mob attack on the Israeli Embassy earlier this month.

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4:31am

Mon September 26, 2011
World

Security Expert: U.S. 'Leading Force' Behind Stuxnet

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 4:00 pm

German cybersecurity expert Ralph Langner warns that U.S. utility companies are not yet prepared to deal with the threat presented by the Stuxnet computer worm, which he says the U.S. developed.
Courtesy of Langner Communications

One year ago, German cybersecurity expert Ralph Langner announced that he had found a computer worm designed to sabotage a nuclear facility in Iran. It's called Stuxnet, and it was the most sophisticated worm Langner had ever seen.

In the year since, Stuxnet has been analyzed as a cyber-superweapon, one so dangerous it might even harm those who created it.

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4:30am

Mon September 26, 2011
The Salt

Kids' Sugar Cravings Might Be Biological

iStockphoto.com

Ask a child if they like sweets and the answer is almost universally a resounding "Yes!" It's no surprise to most parents that kids love candy, cookies, sweetened drinks, and some kids have even been known to add sugar to a bowl of Frosted Flakes. But don't blame the kids, say researchers, it's biology.

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4:30am

Mon September 26, 2011
World

Fragile U.S.-Pakistan Relations On Downward Spiral

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 1:35 pm

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta looks on at left as Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen testifies Thursday in Washington.
Harry Hamburg AP

The fragile and troubled relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan is on a deep, downward spiral. Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said last week that Pakistan's intelligence agency had a role in several high-profile attacks in Afghanistan, including the attack earlier this month on the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.

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4:30am

Mon September 26, 2011
Election 2012

Voters May Face Slower Lines In 2012 Elections

Elections are expensive. And with money tight, election offices across the country are facing cutbacks.

This means voters could be in for some surprises — such as longer lines and fewer voting options — when they turn out for next year's primary and general elections.

A lot of decisions about the 2012 elections are being made today. How many voting machines are needed? Where should polling places be located? How many poll workers have to be hired?

'We're Down To A Critical Level'

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4:30am

Mon September 26, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

When It Comes To Pain Relief, One Size Doesn't Fit All

iStockphoto.com

When you get a headache or suffer joint pain, perhaps ibuprofen works to relieve your pain. Or maybe you take acetaminophen. Or aspirin. Researchers now confirm what many pain specialists and patients already knew: Pain relief differs from person to person.

Dr. Perry Fine is president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. He also sees patients and conducts research at the University of Utah Pain Management Center.

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12:01am

Mon September 26, 2011
Fine Art

Andy Warhol's 'Headline': Sensationalism Always Sells

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 2:52 pm

By 1985, Warhol's style had evolved substantially; on this untitled headline piece, he collaborated with Keith Haring.
National Gallery of Art

Pop artist Andy Warhol died in 1987, but he's making his presence felt around the nation's capital these days. He's featured in an art fair, in restaurants, in galleries and in two major museums. The Hirschhorn Museum is exhibiting silkscreens and paintings Warhol did — of photographs of shadows. And the National Gallery of Art has its first one-man Warhol show, Headlines, focused on a series of paintings he made of Page One tabloid headlines.

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4:11pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Religion

'Biblical Womanhood': A Year Of Living By The Book

In deference to Titus 2:3-5 and 1 Timothy 5:14, Rachel Held Evans tried to stay "busy in the home," honing her cooking, cleaning and hospitality skills. She is seen here with homemade matzah toffee for Passover.
Dan Evans

As an evangelical Christian, Rachel Held Evans often heard about the importance of practicing "biblical womanhood," but she didn't quite know what that meant. Everyone she asked seemed to have a different definition.

Evans decided to embark on a quest to figure out how to be a woman by the Bible's standards. For one year, she has followed every rule in the Old and New Testaments. Her project will end next Saturday.

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4:00pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Energy

New Boom Reshapes Oil World, Rocks North Dakota

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 11:57 am

Ben Shaw hangs from an oil derrick outside Williston, ND, in July 2011. Williston's mayor, Ward Koeser, estimates that the town has between 2,000 and 3,000 job openings for oil workers.
Gregory Bull AP

A couple months ago, Jake Featheringill and his wife got robbed.

It wasn't serious. No one was home at the time, and no one got hurt. But for Featheringill, it was just the latest in a string of bad luck.

"We made a decision," he says. "We decided to pick up and move in about three days. Packed all our stuff up in storage. Drove 24 straight hours on I-29, and made it to Williston with no place to live."

That's Williston, ND. Population — until just a few years ago — 12,000. Jake was born there, but moved away when he was a kid. He hadn't been back since.

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3:56pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Space

Launch Logistics: Speedy Rocket, Slow Electronics

NASA's GRAIL mission to study the moon launches aboard a Delta II rocket at Kennedy Space Center on Sept. 10.
Sandra Joseph and Don Kight NASA

Weird things jump out at me in press releases.

Take the press kit NASA prepared for the GRAIL mission. GRAIL consists of two nearly identical spacecraft that are on their way to the moon. Once there, they will make a precise map of the moon's gravitational field. Such a map will help scientists refine their theories about how the moon formed and what the interior is made of.

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3:00pm

Sun September 25, 2011
World

Haiti's Martelly: From Pop Star To President

Six months ago, Michel Martelly was "Sweet Mickey" — a pop star known for his bald head and big parties. Now, he's the president of Haiti. He spent the last week in New York, mingling with world leaders and wooing new investors. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz speaks with President Martelly about his new job, and where billions of relief dollars have gone in the earthquake-stricken nation.

2:50pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Author Interviews

'Awesome Man' Is Super, And Maybe You Are, Too

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 9:50 am

Awesome Man, the creation of author Michael Chabon and illustrator Jake Parker, can shoot positronic rays out of his eyeballs. Click here to read an excerpt of The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man.
Balzer Bray

Michael Chabon won a Pulitzer Prize for The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay back in 2001. Ten years later, he has a new book out, called The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man.

This one may sound like a sequel, but Chabon isn't after another Pulitzer. He's looking for ohhhs and ahhhs, hearty giggles and gleeful faces as kids from coast to coast bed down for the night.

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12:39pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Author Interviews

'Skyjack': The Unsolved Case Of D.B. Cooper's Escape

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 11:09 am

A 1971 artist's sketch released by the FBI shows the skyjacker known as "Dan Cooper" and "D.B. Cooper." The sketch was made from the recollections of passengers and crew of a Northwest Orient Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland, Ore., and Seattle.
Anonymous AP

America's only unsolved airline hijacking happened the day before Thanksgiving in 1971. A man boarded a flight to Seattle wearing a dark sports jacket, a clip-on tie and horn-rimmed sunglasses. He took a seat in row 18E, at the very back of the Boeing 727. Almost immediately, he ordered a drink and lit a cigarette.

As the plane began to take off, he passed a note to the flight attendant that read, "Miss, I have a bomb here. I want you to sit by me."

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11:56am

Sun September 25, 2011
The Two-Way

Stings Halt Diana Nyad's Cuba-Florida Swim

The AP is reporting that Diana Nyad, the 62-year-old endurance swimmer, has given up her attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida. The cause? Painful man o' war stings, which medics warned her could be life-threatening. CNN says:

Nyad was pulled out of the water shortly after 11 a.m. following injuries sustained Saturday evening and strong cross-currents that were pushing her off course, her team Captain Mark Sollinger said. The 62-year-old swam more than 67 nautical miles — about two-thirds of the distance.

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10:01am

Sun September 25, 2011
Middle East

Saudi King Gives Women Right To Vote

Saudi King Abdullah said Sunday women in his country will be allowed to vote for the first time ever in nationwide elections scheduled four years from now.

The king in a televised speech to his advisory council said women will be able to run as candidates and cast ballots in the next municipal elections scheduled for 2015. He also pledged to appoint women to his advisory council.

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8:00am

Sun September 25, 2011
Middle East

Palestinians, Israelis Form Neighborhood Watches

The Palestinian push for statehood recognition has sparked fears of new violence in the West Bank. Neither Palestinians nor Israelis appear content with the security provided by their own governments, and "Neighborhood Security Watch" groups have been formed by both groups. While settlers are trained by the Israeli Defense Forces, Palestinians are forming teams to monitor, document and detain settlers they believe will seek out attacks. Sheera Frenkel reports.

8:00am

Sun September 25, 2011
Politics

Herman Cain Takes Florida Straw Poll By Surprise

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 11:47 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, Host:

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8:00am

Sun September 25, 2011
NPR Story

It's Friday Night Lights In Gov. Perry's Hometown

Texas Gov. Rick Perry's campaign speeches often note that he's from Paint Creek, Texas, a place in the flat, dusty, west-central part of the state that's so small it's barely on the map. NPR National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea headed there this week, and along the way watched Perry's old high school play a football game.

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