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4:29pm

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

DOJ Reaches Agreement For Oversight Of Albuquerque PD

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:03 pm

The mayor of Albuquerque has signed off on a framework of principles to submit the city's troubled police department to oversight by an independent monitor.

The deal, announced by the Justice Department, is aimed at addressing eight problem areas identified in a report last year by officials.

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4:25pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Deceptive Cadence

Labor Conflict May Lock Out Met Opera Workers

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers of a lockout if a contract deal isn't settled by July 31.
Astrid Stawiarz Getty Images

The clock is ticking for the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The world's largest opera company may be headed for a shutdown. Most of the union contracts for the Met expire in a week. Yesterday, Met General Manager Peter Gelb sent a letter to the unions, warning them to prepare for a lockout if they don't come to terms.

For months now, the company and its unions have been at an impasse. Management has proposed cutting 16 percent of union members' compensation. Otherwise, Gelb contends, the company could go bankrupt in two to three years.

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4:21pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Author Interviews

When It Comes To Creativity, Are Two Heads Better Than One?

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Brothers and aviation pioneers Orville and Wilbur Wright walk together in 1910.
National Archives Getty Images

Joshua Wolf Shenk doesn't believe in the myth of the lone genius. "What has one person ever done alone?" he asks NPR's Robert Siegel. "We think of Martin Luther King and Sigmund Freud and Warren Buffett and Steve Jobs as these great solo creators, but in fact, if you look into the details of their life, they are enmeshed in relationships all the way through."

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4:19pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Monkey See

5 Things I Learned About TV's Future From The Critics Press Tour

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 7:09 pm

Noah Hawley (left) and Warren Littlefield, executive producers of the FX series Fargo, speak at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

The voice came from over my shoulder, a shouted greeting in a room crowded with journalists, publicists, network executives, producers and stars.

I tuned to see David Boreanaz, star of the Fox TV show Bones, calling out to me like a long-lost friend. I knew he had mistaken me for someone else — in a party held by Fox at the exclusive Soho House club, where everyone from Kelsey Grammer to David Tennant was sipping cocktails and talking shop, it wasn't hard to make that kind of mistake.

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4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Middle East

Attack On U.N. School Kills Over A Dozen Civilians In Gaza

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Middle East

Palestinian Authority Faces A Fraught Path To Peace In Gaza

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Hamas is asking for the blockade of Gaza to end. Would the Palestinian Authority, would President Abbas, accept the condition that Gaza would be permitted no rockets, no weapons that could reach Israel if the crossings were to reopen?

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4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Shots - Health News

For Better Treatment, Doctors And Patients Share The Decisions

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

When weighing the risk of heart disease, how the numbers are presented to patients can make all the difference.
iStockphoto

Many of us get confused by claims of how much the risk of a heart attack, for example, might be reduced by taking medicine for it. And doctors can get confused, too.

Just ask Karen Sepucha. She runs the Health Decisions Sciences Center at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital. A few years ago she surveyed primary care physicians, and asked how confident they were in their ability to talk about numbers and probabilities with patients.

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4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
News

Central American Leaders: Immigrant Children Are A Shared Problem

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Africa

Missing Air Algerie Flight Appears To Have Crashed In Mali

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Law

Botched Ariz. Execution Renews Unease Over Lethal Injections

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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4:15pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Law

The Death Clerk, And Other Details Of Last-Minute Execution Appeals

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Arizona's execution is the third botched or problematic execution this year. And it poses lots of legal questions. So we have NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg now to answer them. Hi.

NINA TOTENBERG, BYLINE: Hi.

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3:33pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Business

4 Theories About Why Wal-Mart Changed Its U.S. Chief

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:23 pm

Bill Simon, head of Wal-Mart's U.S. division, is leaving the retail giant after being passed over for the company's top post.
Rick Wilking Reuters/Landov

Bill Simon, head of Wal-Mart's U.S. division, is leaving the retail giant, the company said Thursday.

Any major shake-up at Wal-Mart is closely watched because the company is so important — it tops the Fortune 500 list with annual sales approaching a half-trillion dollars. So lots of people are speculating about what Simon's departure really means. Here are some theories:

The Simplest Explanation

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3:20pm

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

U.S.: Russia-Based Artillery Targeting Ukrainian Troops

Ukrainian troops camouflage their multiple rocket launcher at a checkpoint in Kryva Luka, in eastern Ukraine, earlier this month. The U.S. says Russia is planning to provide similar systems to the rebels.
Evgeniy Maloletka AP

The U.S. says it has "new evidence" that Russian forces have been firing artillery across the border to attack Ukrainian military positions, and that Moscow is planning to ship powerful rocket artillery to the rebels it backs in the country's east.

"We have new evidence that the Russians intend to deliver heavier and more powerful multiple rocket launchers to the separatist forces in Ukraine, and have evidence that Russia is firing artillery from within Russia to attack Ukrainian military positions," State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said during a daily briefing.

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2:58pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Goats and Soda

This Suit Keeps Ebola Out — So How Can A Health Worker Catch It?

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:56 pm

Protective gear runs from goggles and head covering to gloves and boots. This health worker was photographed leaving the isolation area at the treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

The fight against Ebola in West Africa suffered a setback Wednesday. Dr. Sheik Umar Khan, one of the top doctors treating patients, caught the virus, even though he was wearing protective gear.

"Even with the full protective clothing you put on," Khan has said, "you are at risk."

That statement made us wonder about those yellow and white suits you see in photos: Just how good are they at protecting health workers from the bodily fluids that can transmit the virus — vomit, blood, sweat, mucus?

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2:39pm

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

Central American Presidents Say U.S. Shares Responsibility For Migration Crisis

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 2:45 pm

President of Honduras Juan Orlando Hernandez, left, delivers remarks on immigration beside President of Guatemala Otto Perez Molina.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

The presidents of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador will meet with President Obama on Friday.

But before the meeting, the heads of state are making the rounds in Washington, telling their side of an immigration crisis that has driven tens of thousands of unaccompanied children to the U.S. border.

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2:27pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Book Reviews

'Panic In A Suitcase' Puts A Fresh Spin On A Coming-To-America Story

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 10:17 am

There's a wonderful 1982 memoir called An Orphan in History by the late Village Voice writer Paul Cowan. It's about Cowan's search for his European Jewish roots, and in it he says something about the sacrifices of older generations of immigrants that's always stayed with me. Cowan says: "Millions of immigrant families . . . left the economically and culturally confining Old World towns where they were raised, and paid for the freedom and prosperity this country offered with their pasts."

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2:27pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Iraq

Human Rights Watch Researcher Reports ISIS Abuses In Iraq

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 10:17 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

1:01pm

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

Zoo In Argentina Says 'Sad Bear' Too Old To Go To Canada

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:55 pm

Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, lives in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza. The plight of the "sad bear" has spawned more than 400,000 signatures on a petition to get him moved to a "better life" in Canada.
AFP Getty Images

Despite a public outcry that resulted in more than a half-million petition signatures and a personal appeal by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Arturo, Argentina's "sad bear," has been deemed too old to migrate to Canada.

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12:55pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Parallels

Syrian President Issues New Stamps, But Can't Deliver The Mail

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:06 pm

One of the three stamps issued recently to commemorate Syrian leader Bashar Assad's presidential election victory.
Via Syrian Arab News Agency

As the Middle East froths with blood — from Iraq to Syria to the Gaza Strip — a commemorative set of three stamps depicting Syrian President Bashar Assad may not seem hugely relevant.

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12:23pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Media

Racially-Charged Casting Call: 'Surprising' But Not Shocking To Insiders

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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12:23pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Interviews

Performer Rita Moreno's Famed Career Was 'Meant To Be'

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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12:23pm

Thu July 24, 2014
Music Lists

Erykah Badu's 'Tyrone' Gives TMM Producer Amazing Stage Presence

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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11:46am

Thu July 24, 2014
Shots - Health News

When Federal Privacy Laws Protect Hospitals Instead Of Patients

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 11:50 am

ProPublica

In the name of patient privacy, a security guard at a hospital in Springfield, Mo., threatened a mother with jail for trying to take a photograph of her own son.

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11:42am

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

Ukraine's Prime Minister Quits After Allies Withdraw From Coalition

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:23 pm

Ukraine's prime minister announced today that he is resigning after two parties said they were withdrawing from the ruling coalition.

"I am announcing my resignation in connection with the collapse of the coalition," Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said, adding Parliament could no longer do its work.

The Associated Press adds:

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11:32am

Thu July 24, 2014
Goats and Soda

Globe-Trotting Virus Hides Inside People's Gut Bacteria

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:34 pm

We are all Russian nesting dolls: Our intestines house many bacteria, which house many viruses. These so-called bacteriophages are likely as important for our health as the bacteria they live in.
Lisa Brown for NPR

New viruses are a dime a dozen.

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11:19am

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

'This Is Wrong': U.N. Secretary General Condemns Attack On Gaza School

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 9:40 am

Injured Palestinian children lie on the floor of an emergency room after the U.N. school where they took refuge in the northern Gaza Strip was shelled.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Updated at 7:59 p.m. ET.

A United Nations-run school sheltering civilians in Gaza came under attack Thursday, the U.N. says. More than a dozen people have been killed, according to Palestinian officials.

Reuters quotes Chris Gunness, a spokesman for the U.N. Relief and Works Agency, the main U.N. agency in Gaza, as confirming that the shelter in Beit Hanoun was hit.

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11:08am

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

European Court Rules Against Poland In CIA 'Black Sites' Case

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:50 pm

Barbed-wire fence surrounding a military area is pictured in the forest near Stare Kiejkuty village, close to Szczytno in northeastern Poland. The CIA ran a secret jail on Polish soil, the European Court of Human Rights ruled Thursday.
Kacper Pempel Reuters/Landov

The European Court of Human Rights ruled today that Poland broke the European human rights convention by allowing the CIA to imprison and torture two terrorism suspects in secret prisons on its soil.

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11:03am

Thu July 24, 2014
The Two-Way

U.S. Database Glitch Delays Passport, Visa Processing

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:07 pm

The U.S. State Department's global database for processing visas and passports is experiencing problems that could cause delays for millions of people around the world who are awaiting travel documents.

The Associated Press writes:

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10:47am

Thu July 24, 2014
Goats and Soda

Shades Of The Middle Ages: The Plague Popped Up In China And Colorado

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:48 pm

Health officials examine rats for signs of bubonic plague in New Orleans, 1914.
U.S. National Library of Medicine

The plague isn't just something you read about in medieval history books.

This past week, five cases were reported: four in Colorado and one in China.

The Colorado residents were diagnosed after coming into contact with an infected dog.

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10:15am

Thu July 24, 2014
Business

Rural Startups, Often Overlooked, Are The Focus Of New Investment Programs

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 7:39 am

Copyright 2014 North Country Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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