Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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9:59am

Wed August 10, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Stock Markets Fall Sharply In Early Trading

U.S. stocks stumbled out of the gate Wednesday, falling more than 300 points in the first few minutes of trading.

The sharp drop came despite a rally that buoyed U.S. indexes Tuesday, and rallies from the European and Asian markets Wednesday. Global investors seemed to take heart in the Federal Reserve's pledge to maintain low interest rates and stabilize the U.S. economy.

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9:53am

Wed August 10, 2011
The Two-Way

Woman's Leap To Safety Become An Iconic Image Of London Riots

After hearing people shout that a woman was about to jump from a burning building, photographer Amy Weston snapped this image of the woman's leap to safety.
Amy Weston WENN

An arresting image of a woman jumping into the arms of riot police has become a sensation, as the stark silhouette of her leaping figure against a background of bright flames captures a dramatic moment in Britain's riots. At least five of Britain's largest newspapers used the photo on their front pages Tuesday.

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9:19am

Wed August 10, 2011
The Two-Way

Philip Levine Named As America's New Poet Laureate

America's new poet laureate, Philip Levine, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1995. Here, he's seen in a file photo at the San Joaquin River Center in Fresno, Calif.
Gary Kazanjian AP

America has a new poet laureate today, as the Library of Congress names Philip Levine in the one-year position. He will succeed W.S. Merwin in the post. Born in Detroit in 1928, Levine has used his poetry to examine blue-collar life, often embroidering everyday events with a sense of myth.

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6:55pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

U.K. Riots Continue Outside London; Bookstores Soldier On

Fire rips through a retail store in Manchester, in northwest England, Tuesday, marking a fourth night of violence in Britain. Looters have targeted electronics and clothing stores.
Andrew Yates AFP/Getty Images

With 16,000 police officers out in full force in London's streets in an effort to put a stop to violent riots that have ravaged the city for three days, the British capital was "relatively calm" Tuesday, says the BBC.

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5:53pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

In U.S. Stock Market Rally, Apple Briefly Supplanted Exxon Mobil

A trader at the New York Stock Exchange watches a monitor moments before the Federal Reserve announced it would keep interest rates low through at least 2013. The news reassured investors and helped sustain a rally.
Mario Tama Getty Images

For evidence of the volatile swings of Tuesday's stock market, consider that for a bit, Apple became the most valuable American company, surpassing Exxon Mobil. The day's trading spanned 600 points, as investors rallied from two days of steep declines and digested new guidance from the Federal Reserve.

The S&P 500 index of large-cap U.S. companies saw its largest gain in two years, rising by nearly 5 percent. Just the day before, it had fallen by 6.7 percent.

For Newscast, Yuki Noguchi filed this report:

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5:06pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Official Is First To Attend Nagasaki Ceremony Marking Nuclear Strike

James Zumwalt, deputy chief of the U.S. embassy in Tokyo, offers a wreath of flowers at a ceremony marking the 66th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki.
AFP/Getty Images

A ceremonial bell tolled in Nagasaki, Japan, Tuesday morning, marking the beginning of a moment of silence to remember tens of thousands of people killed by an atomic bomb that fell from a U.S. plane 66 years ago. And for the first time, the ceremony was attended by a U.S. government official.

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4:06pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

Mysterious Orange Goo ID'ed As Eggs; Alaskan Village Still Worries

Scientists say the microscopic eggs, seen here under magnification, derive their orange color from a droplet of fat.
NOAA

A mysterious orange goo that appeared on the shore of a small village in Alaska has been identified as "millions of microscopic eggs filled with fatty droplets," the AP reports. But researchers say they still don't know what the eggs might hatch, or if they are toxic.

The mass of eggs began appearing last week, surprising even longtime residents of the village of Kivalina. Discovery News, which spoke with a town official, describes the goo:

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2:59pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

Aid Boosted To Somalia; U.S. Mogadishu Vet Says He Would Return

Some 800 metric tons of food are on the way to East Africa, where more than 12 million people are suffering from a severe drought. The U.N. World Food Program is using nine airlifts to send high-energy biscuits to Kenya, where it will be distributed to famine victims.

The shipment is expected to be enough to feed 1.6 million people for one day. The United Nations says that 640,000 children in the Horn of Africa region are at risk of acute malnutrition.

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1:47pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

China Sees Inflation Spike; Prods 'Relevant Nations' To Tighten Deficits

China said its politically sensitive inflation rate hit a 37-month high of 6.5 percent in July. Food costs, rose by 14.8 percent from a year ago, according to reports. Above, people shop for produce at a Beijing market Tuesday.
Peter Parks AFP/Getty Images

As the world's financial markets struggle to cope with fears of a U.S. recession and a spreading European debt crisis, China on Tuesday called for more cooperation to stabilize markets and encourage growth.

Adding its seal of approval to a joint statement from finance ministers and central bank governors of the Group of 20 nations issued Monday, China's top officials urged "relevant nations" to cut their deficits and get debt problems under control.

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1:02pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

In Wake Of Two Triathletes' Deaths, NYC Event May See Changes

Triathletes begin the 1,500-meter swim (just under 1 mile) in the Hudson River as part of last year's New York City Triathlon. Two race participants died during this year's swim portion.
Dario Cantatore Getty Images

The New York City Triathlon was the scene for an unprecedented tragedy Sunday, is considering changes to its screening process, after two competitors died during Sunday's race. Both Michael Kudryk, 64, and Amy Martich, 40, died during the swim portion of the event.

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7:46pm

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Market Indexes Sink On U.S. Debt Concerns; Widespread Losses Seen

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke may look to reassure global financial markets Tuesday. Here, he arrives for a Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee hearing in July.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

U.S. stock benchmarks took another big hit Monday, in the first day of trading since America's credit was downgraded by Standard and Poor's rating agency late Friday. The Dow Jones Industrial index closed below the 11,000 mark for the first time since late 2010, ending the day at 10,811.

The Standard and Poor's 500 Index, meant to reflect the U.S. domestic economy, sank by 6.7 percent Monday. According to Bloomberg, all 500 of the stocks in the index declined on the same day — something that hadn't happened since at least 1996.

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6:05pm

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

London Endures A Third Night Of Riots, Violence; Cameron Cuts Vacation Short

A rioter throws a rock at riot police in Clarence Road in Hackney, London, Monday. Rioting and looting continued into the night Monday in parts of London, as well as in Birmingham. The unrest was prompted by the initial rioting in Tottenham and then in Brixton on Sunday night.
Dan Istitene Getty Images

Cars and buildings were burning and stores were looted in areas across London Monday, on the third night of riots and violence in the British capital. "Area is an absolute war zone," pub manager Alan McCabe told the BBC in Croydon.

Prime Minister David Cameron is returning early from his summer vacation to help get the riots under control. He will meet with police and Home Office officials Tuesday, part of his "COBRA" emergency response team. The group takes its name from the Cabinet Office Briefing Room in which it meets.

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4:38pm

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Alleged 'Patent Troll' Hit With Large Fine In Appeals Court

A ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit is being seen as a victory against "patent trolls," companies that acquire intellectual property for the sole purpose of extracting licensing fees or settlements, despite having no intention of using the protected technology or idea themselves.

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3:40pm

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Research Shows Texas Having A Link To Antarctica

Scientists have found evidence that parts of North America and East Antarctica were joined in a supercontinent called Rodinia 1.1 billion years ago.
Robin E. Bell Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Scientists have long thought that Earth's continents once formed a "supercontinent" called Pangaea. Now they've found evidence that parts of North America and East Antarctica were joined in a supercontinent called Rodinia 1.1 billion years ago — even earlier than Pangaea.

"I can go to the Franklin Mountains in West Texas and stand next to what was once part of Coats Land in Antarctica," said geochemist Staci Loewy, who led the work. "That's so amazing."

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2:29pm

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

SEALs' Chopper Was On A Rescue Mission, NATO Says

New details are emerging about the downing of a Chinook military helicopter in Afghanistan early Saturday that killed 30 U.S. service members and 8 Afghans. Of the American casualties, 22 were Navy SEALS. The NATO mission in Afghanistan released a statement about the crash Monday.

For Newscast, Ahmad Shafi reported:

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12:23pm

Mon August 8, 2011
The Two-Way

Syria Is Hacked By Anonymous, And Pressed By Gulf Allies

The hacking group Anonymous took over Syria's defense ministry site Monday.
imgur

Syria's President Bashar Assad has removed the country's defense minister and replaced him with the army chief of staff, according to Syria's state-run news agency. The change, one of several in key government posts, comes during Syria's "brutal crackdown on a five-month-old uprising" against Assad, the AP reports.

That crackdown is bringing pressure on Syria and Assad from nearly all quarters. As Eyder reported earlier, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have now recalled their ambassadors. Here's a quick rundown of other developments:

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7:13pm

Fri August 5, 2011
The Two-Way

DuPont Pulls Herbicide Blamed For Tree Deaths From Market

Damage done to these Norway spruce trees has been blamed on contact with Imprelis. DuPont is pulling the herbicide.
Penn State Extension

DuPont Co. is pulling a new herbicide from the market, after it was blamed for damaging or killing thousands of trees. Since the EPA approved the weedkiller Imprelis for sale last October, it has become the target of several lawsuits.

As reported by the Lawn and Landscape website, DuPont has posted a letter announcing the suspension of sales, and instituting a return-for-refund policy. The company also expressed regret for any "tree injuries."

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6:03pm

Fri August 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Volatile Market Week Brings Promise Of Cheaper Gas

U.S. stock markets finished Friday with a mix of gains and losses, ending a volatile week of steep declines on Wall Street. The release of better-than-expected July job numbers helped early in the day, but the data only seemed to pause, not end, the blood-letting.

But for drivers, there's an upside to the market's losses: The price of gasoline is going to fall, as well, dragged down by the same fears that prompted the flight from stocks.

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4:44pm

Fri August 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Small Beer Brewers Hit With '50 Percent Local' Rule In Massachusetts

Cellarman Cooper Reid packs cases of beer at the Ipswich Ale Brewery in July. New rules put out by the state's alcohol commission require "farmer-brewers" like Ipswich to grow 50 percent of their own grains and hops, or get it from domestic farms.
Boston Globe Boston Globe via Getty Images

Small beer brewers in Massachusetts were shocked this week, when the state alcohol commission announced a new rule that any "farmer-brewers" in the state must grow at least 50 percent of their beer's hops and grain themselves, or get them from a domestic farm they've contracted with for the purpose.

When it announced the advisory, the commission emphasized that farmer-brewer licenses were created to encourage development of the state's domestic farms. But the license also costs far less money than a full "manufacturer" permit.

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1:32pm

Fri August 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Obama Outlines Plan To Spur Hiring Of Veterans

President Obama outlined his plan to help veterans find jobs Friday, calling for better training for demobilized soldiers and tax credits for employers who hire them. In June, there were 1 million unemployed veterans in America, and the jobless rate for post-Sept. 11 veterans stood at 13.3 percent — about four points higher than the national average.

Ari Shapiro filed this report for Newscast:

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12:46pm

Fri August 5, 2011
The Two-Way

L.A. School District Rehires 450 Teachers Laid Off In June

The Los Angeles school district has rehired 450 elementary school teachers who had been laid off in June. The AP reports that the jobs were restored after "a combination of retirements, resignations, dismissals and a four-day furlough agreement with the teachers union allowed the district to rescind the layoffs."

The layoffs were part of massive job cuts instituted this summer, as Los Angeles dealt with state funding cuts. Although the school district has rehired 4,170 teachers and support staff since those initial cuts were made, some 1,450 personnel remain laid off.

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11:52am

Fri August 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Comcast Announces $10 Web Access For Low-Income Families

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 11:30 am

Cable and Internet provider Comcast is launching a new initiative aimed at bridging the digital divide, offering discounted web access and home computers to families that meet income requirements.

The plan, called Internet Essentials, will be available wherever Comcast offers Internet services — which it currently does in 39 states. The company has launched websites in English and Spanish to promote the program.

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6:22pm

Thu August 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Pet Owners Win: Chinese City Relents On Dog Ban

Dog lovers in China and elsewhere can sleep easier tonight, after officials in Jiangmen withdrew a proposed ban on dogs in the city. The near-total ban, which would have resulted in thousands of dogs being either killed or transported to rural areas, was prompted by fears of rabies in the city of 3.8 million.

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4:58pm

Thu August 4, 2011
The Two-Way

The Coach Who Was Cool To The Cafeteria Dude

Ray Horton made an unusual bargain with a cafeteria worker when he left his job coaching the Pittsburgh Steelers' secondary.
NFL Getty Images

An unlikely story has emerged from the world of the NFL, which until recently exported only tales of internecine warfare among millionaires. But first: If you're a football fan — but love to hate the Pittsburgh Steelers — you may want to just click away now. Because what happened recently may diminish your ability to despise the Steel Curtain.

The day before Steelers secondary coach Ray Horton left to become the Arizona Cardinals' defensive coordinator, he stopped by the team complex for some final farewells.

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2:44pm

Thu August 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Budweiser Dresses Up Its Cans For 2011

The 12 Cans Of Budweiser: Bud's new design (far right) emphasizes a bow tie. A 1940s version for soldiers (second from left) used olive drab, presumably to blend into combat situations.
Anheuser-Busch InBev

Is Budweiser puttin' on the Ritz? The self-crowned King of Beers will soon be sold in a newly designed can — one whose graphics are dominated by a bow tie. And the can's new look was created by a London-based design firm.

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1:44pm

Thu August 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Japanese Industry Minister Fires Three Nuclear Officials, Plans To Resign

Japan is firing three top nuclear energy officials, nearly five months after the country suffered the worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. And Banri Kaieda, the industry minister in charge of energy policy, said that he will resign as soon as he replaces the officials.

"I'm planning to breathe fresh air into the ministry with a large-scale reshuffle," Kaieda said at a news conference. "I'll have new people rebuild the ministry."

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1:08pm

Thu August 4, 2011
The Two-Way

Flower Once Thought Extinct Will Come Off Endangered List

The Tennessee purple coneflower, a wild Echinacea plant, was first discovered in the late 1800s. But it was believed to be extinct before a botanist found a sample in the 1960s.
J.S. Peterson USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Fifty years after it was brought back from extinction, a Southern flower has taken another step toward survival, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to take it off its Threatened and Endangered Species list.

The Tennessee purple coneflower is only the fifth plant ever to be removed from the list due to recovery. The move, announced Wednesday, will become official on Sept. 2.

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6:29pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

The Swiss Franc Soars As Markets Dip, And That Worries The Swiss

When the Swiss franc hit a historic high of buying .70 euros in May 2010, people lined up at a Geneva exchange office to get rid of their euros. This week, one Swiss franc bought .90 euros.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

The currency of Switzerland has soared to record highs against the U.S. dollar and the euro. And that has the Swiss government worried, as a stronger franc also makes the country's exports more expensive.

Investors have rushed to buy Swiss francs, seeing them as a safe haven. In much the same way, gold prices have soared in recent times of economic uncertainty. Gold hit a new record this week, trading at $1,661 an ounce.

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5:05pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

As FAA Shutdown Continues, Workers Miss Pay, Medical Coverage

The FAA's partial shutdown doesn't affect air traffic controllers (above). But the impasse has left some 47,000 workers without a paycheck.
John Moore Getty Images

The FAA's partial shutdown will be coming up on the two-week mark Saturday, and there's little sign of movement on the issue. Here's a collection of recent developments to keep you updated:

The shutdown doesn't include air traffic controllers. But it has left 4,000 FAA employees, and an additional 70,000 contractors, either furloughed or fired outright.

NPR's Richard Gonzales spoke to Richard Zemlok, an electrician in Oakland, Calif., who was one of those left without a paycheck:

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2:06pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Chinese City Bans Dogs, Telling Owners To Turn Them In

A sign reading "No Entry For Dogs" is posted near the Confucius Temple in a file photo from Nanjing, China. The city sought to remove stray dogs in 2007, prompted by fears of rabies.
China Photos Getty Images

Officials in Jiangmen, China, are banning residents from keeping dogs, in a move that will take effect at the end of August, according to Chinese media. In one week, owners can begin taking their dogs to drop-off centers, where they will be either adopted by residents of rural areas or euthanized.

The ban targets dogs in densely populated sections of Jiangmen, a city with a population of 3.8 million. Any owners who wish to keep their dogs must apply for a license, reports China Daily.

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