Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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3:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
Presidential Race

DNC Launches Romney Attack Ad In Key States

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 6:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

There's a new political ad out today from the Democratic National Committee. It highlights what Democrats consider Mitt Romney's greatest weakness: his inconsistency. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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10:29am

Tue November 22, 2011
Election 2012

Online Ads: Spreading Your Message, On A Budget

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 12:23 pm

This video frame grab provided by the Mitt Romney presidential campaign shows a scene from an ad called "Believe in America" that is running in New Hampshire.
Romney Presidential Campaign AP

3:01am

Fri November 18, 2011
Newt Gingrich

To Imagine A Gingrich Presidency, Look To The '90s

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 2:54 pm

In September 1994, then-House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich addressed Republican congressional candidates on Capitol Hill during a rally where they pledged a new "Contract with America." Months later, Republicans gained control of both houses of Congress for the first time in decades, and Gingrich became speaker of the House.
John Duricka AP

Newt Gingrich served as speaker of the House of Representatives for four turbulent and productive years.

From 1995 through 1998, Congress forced a government shutdown, overhauled the welfare system, balanced the budget for the first time in decades and impeached a president for the second time in history.

Gingrich was in the middle of those debates, fiery in his rhetoric, yet willing to compromise and work with a Democratic president.

The 104th Congress

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2:57pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Newt Gingrich

For Gingrich, A Slow And Steady Climb To The Top

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich talks with Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad (left) and PBS Nightly Business Report co-anchor and managing editor Tom Hudson during a Nov. 1 forum on manufacturing at Vermeer Manufacturing in Pella, Iowa.
Steve Pope Getty Images

As the Republican presidential candidates prepare for another debate, this one Saturday night in South Carolina, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich has been campaigning in New Hampshire.

He opened up his state headquarters Friday, buoyed by some recent polls that show his support increasing among Republican voters. A new CBS poll has him tied for second place with Mitt Romney, behind Herman Cain.

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12:01am

Mon November 7, 2011
Election 2012

In Ads, Candidates Turn Up Heat On Romney

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 11:50 am

4:43am

Fri October 28, 2011
Herman Cain

Herman Cain's Ads Unconventional If Not Effective

A screen grab from Herman Cain's campaign ad.

YouTube

3:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Politics

Letter Carrier Union Hires Former Obama Adviser

The union representing the nation's letter carriers has hired a former Obama administration adviser as it faces proposals that could lead to layoffs of thousands of its members. Ron Bloom oversaw the administration's auto industry task force. His hiring by the National Association of Letter Carriers comes as the union is negotiating a new contract with the U.S. Postal Service, which cannot find a way to make delivering mail by hand profitable. It is losing billions of dollars and is considering drastic steps to cut costs.

5:09am

Sat October 15, 2011
Around the Nation

'NextGen' Air Traffic System Has Yet To Take Off

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 3:35 pm

An air traffic controller monitors flights in July at the Denver International Airport. The Federal Aviation Administration is planning to modernize its traffic control system, but has faced a number of obstacles.

John Moore Getty Images

The government is trying to modernize the nation's air traffic control system, but cost overruns, software problems and management concerns are making some wonder whether the so-called "Next Generation" system may take another generation to complete.

The radar screens in the nation's aircraft control towers are based on technology dating to World War II. Many of the routes airliners fly were laid out at a time pilots followed bonfires for navigation at night.

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12:01am

Fri October 7, 2011
Politics

Some Latinos See Obama 'Betrayal' On Immigration

Last summer, immigration rights activists in Los Angeles gathered for a rally calling on the government to act on immigration overhaul legislation. Strong Latino support helped President Obama win in 2008, but his support among those voters is slipping.

Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

President Obama came into office with strong Latino support, having won two-thirds of the Latino vote, according to exit polls. But for some, that support has turned to disillusionment.

"There's a deep sense of betrayal and disappointment towards the Obama administration," said Sarahi Uribe, coordinator of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network.

Indeed, the latest Gallup poll shows his support among Latino voters has fallen to 48 percent, a new low.

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12:41am

Sun October 2, 2011
Politics

In West Virginia, Obama's Policies Are On The Ballot

Voters in West Virginia will choose the state's next governor on Tuesday, in a special election to finish the term of Democrat Joe Manchin. The popular former governor left office after being elected to the U.S. Senate last November.

On the ballot are the man who has been acting governor, Democratic state Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, and GOP businessman Bill Maloney.

But Republicans are trying to make the race a referendum on someone not on the ballot: President Obama.

'We Got To Fight Back Washington'

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3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Politics

What Happens If FEMA Runs Out Of Money?

A resident speaks to a Federal Emergency Management Agency agent atop his destroyed house in the devastated town of Hueytown, Ala., on May 1. FEMA will run out of money to help disaster victims by early next week unless Congress acts.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Congress is at odds over a measure needed to keep the government operating past the end of the month.

While lawmakers have a week to work out their differences before the government faces another partial shutdown, one agency faces a much earlier deadline.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency will run out of money early next week, putting a halt to projects in communities around the country still struggling to recover from this year's spate of hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires.

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1:38pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Around the Nation

Bike Infrastructure Hits Congressional Speed Bumps

Originally published on Thu September 22, 2011 9:21 pm

Cities across the country are investing more money in infrastructure to make roads safer for bikes. Last week, a highway bill faced resistance from lawmakers who saw those kinds of projects as an inappropriate use of federal funds.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The corner of 15th and K streets in Washington, D.C., is busy. Buses, trucks, cars and taxis zip by. There are pedestrians and, increasingly, bikes.

Some 57 million adults ride bicycles in the U.S., whether for commuting or exercise or fun. Cities are adding bike lanes with the help of a federal program that gets its money from the highway bill. Some Senate Republicans tried — and ultimately failed — to block funding for that program, which also pays for sidewalks and other pedestrian improvements.

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6:01am

Sun September 11, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Homeland Security Remains An Agency In Progress

The Department of Homeland Security and state governments spend billions of dollars every year on domestic security, helping cities and counties buy up-to-date equipment and strategies for defeating terrorists.

Established in November 2002, the new department absorbed 22 different federal agencies, with the idea of unifying homeland security efforts. But after all this time, have those efforts made us safer?

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6:03am

Sat September 10, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

With TSA, Are We Safer Or Sorry?

At the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, a small temporary exhibit marks Sept. 11, 2001. Along with artifacts found in the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — like a smashed firetruck door and twisted bits of fuselage — is a bin filled with every imaginable object people have tried to carry on airplanes.

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8:00am

Sun September 4, 2011
Politics

Palin Offers No Clues On Presidential Ambitions

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin offered her supporters no hint of her political plans during a speech Saturday at a Tea Party rally in Iowa.

The atmosphere was that of an end-of-summer county fair. There was plenty of food, lots of T-shirts for sale even some country music. But for the 2,000 or so people gathered on a soggy field in Indianola, south of Des Moines, Palin was the main attraction. It wasnt her first visit to Iowa, home of the nation's first presidential caucus next year.

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12:01am

Tue August 30, 2011
Hurricane Irene Hits East Coast

Costs Of Irene Add Up As FEMA Runs Out Of Cash

FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate, shown at a press briefing last week in Washington, says his agency will postpone some repair work on earlier disasters in order to pay for the immediate needs of Irene.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

From washed-away roads in North Carolina to historic bridges flooded out in Vermont, Hurricane Irene took its toll up and down the Eastern Seaboard.

But the East is not the only region to suffer from natural disasters this year. There was a string of deadly tornadoes in the South this spring, floods along the Mississippi and in the Upper Midwest, and last May's devastating tornado in Joplin, Mo.

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12:26pm

Tue August 23, 2011
U.S.

New Rules Aim For More Passenger-Friendly Skies

Passengers wait in line at the United Airlines terminal at Chicago's O'Hare airport in 2009 after a computer malfunction caused long delays and the cancellation of some United flights.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Anyone who flies on an airplane should like some new government regulations that took effect Tuesday. Passengers who get involuntarily bumped will be entitled to more compensation, and airlines face stiffer penalties for long tarmac delays on international flights.

The new rules are aimed at making flying more convenient and hassle-free, according to the Department of Transportation. Secretary Ray LaHood says the new passenger protections will "help ensure that air travelers receive the respect they deserve before, during and after their flight."

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4:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
U.S.

FAA Deal Puts Off Reckoning On Labor, Other Issues

Congress and the Obama administration found a way out of the stalemate that forced a partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration. The temporary fix means a return to work for thousands of FAA workers and contractors idled by the shutdown. But the underlying issues that prevented agreement on a multi-year FAA bill remain unresolved.

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10:38am

Thu August 4, 2011
Economy

Unionizing, Flight Subsidies Central To FAA Standoff

A provision attached to a Federal Aviation Administration budget extension would cut subsidies for flights to rural airports. Among the airports that could be affected is one in Ely, Nev., home state of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

There are two main issues dividing Republicans and Democrats, and the House and Senate, from reaching agreement on reauthorizing funding for the Federal Aviation Administration: a policy on forming unions and subsidized flights at smaller regional airports.

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