Corey Dade

Corey Dade is a national correspondent for the NPR Digital News team. With more than 15 years of journalism experience, he writes news analysis about federal policy, national politics, social trends, cultural issues and other topics for NPR.org.

Prior to NPR, Dade served as the Atlanta-based southern politics and economics reporter at The Wall Street Journal for five years. During that time he covered many of the nation's biggest news stories, including the BP oil spill, the Tiger Woods scandal and the 2008 presidential election, having traveled with the Obama and McCain campaigns. He also covered the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings and Hurricane Katrina, which led to a nine-month special assignment in New Orleans.

At the Journal, Dade also told the stories at the intersection of politics, culture and commerce, such as the Obama presidency's potential to reframe race in America and the battle between African-American and Dominican hair salons for control of the billion-dollar black consumer market.

Dade began his reporting career at The Miami Herald, writing about curbside newspaper racks and other controversies roiling the retirement town of Hallandale, Fla., pop. 30,000. He later covered local and state politics at the Detroit Free Press, The Boston Globe and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

No stranger to radio, over the years Dade has been a frequent guest commentator and analyst on NPR news, talk and information programs and on several cable TV networks.

As a student at Grambling State University in Louisiana, Dade played football for legendary coach Eddie Robinson. He then transferred to his eventual alma mater, the University of Maryland.

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4:25pm

Tue March 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Sharpton 2.0: From Outsider To Insider

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 10:34 am

The Rev. Al Sharpton, founder and president of National Action Network, prepares for his MSNBC show PoliticsNation in January.
Shiho Fukada for NPR

Although he's been a public figure for three decades, the Rev. Al Sharpton is more visible these days than ever, often in ways even he wouldn't have dreamed when he was leading protests on the streets of New York in the 1980s.

If you watched the inauguration ceremony for President Barack Obama, you probably saw the dais behind him filled with the usual lot of past presidents, members of Congress and so on. You also may have caught sight of a new, and improbable, addition: Sharpton.

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5:47pm

Fri February 1, 2013
U.S.

For Some Donors, Boy Scouts' Ban On Gays Doesn't Add Up

Eagle Scout Zach Wahls delivers cartons of petitions to the Boys Scouts of America national board meeting in Orlando, Fla., last May, calling for an end to anti-gay discriminatory practices. Helping to carry the cartons are Mark Anthony Dingbaum and Christine Irvine of Change.org.
Barbara Liston Reuters/Landov

Years of criticism and even a U.S. Supreme Court challenge couldn't force the Boy Scouts of America to admit openly gay members and leaders. But money talks, and after the defections of major donors, the 103-year-old organization is poised to lift its national ban.

Just last summer, the Boy Scouts reaffirmed the ban after a lengthy internal review. Several incidents since then have tarnished the organization's image and fueled an aggressive nationwide protest led by an Eagle Scout.

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5:40pm

Mon January 28, 2013
It's All Politics

Bipartisan Senate Group Kick-Starts Immigration Battle

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 5:41 pm

Five of the eight senators who proposed a bipartisan plan for an immigration overhaul attend a Capitol Hill news conference Monday. From left are John McCain of Arizona, Chuck Schumer of New York, Marco Rubio of Florida, Robert Menendez of New Jersey and Dick Durbin of Illinois.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

A bipartisan Senate plan unveiled Monday to overhaul the U.S. immigration system frames a pitched debate expected in Congress around the areas of border enforcement, a path to citizenship for those already in the country and the future flow of new arrivals.

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5:28pm

Sat January 19, 2013
Around the Nation

The Rev. Al Sharpton, In Six True-False Statements

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 11:19 am

Rev. Al Sharpton, founder and president of National Action Network (NAN), prepares to leave its corporate office for the WWRL radio station in New York, January 11.
Shiho Fukada for NPR

Editor's note: NPR's Corey Dade recently traveled to New York to interview the Rev. Al Sharpton about the unusual arc of his checkered career, from pugnacious street fighter for racial justice to savvy insider with ties to CEOs, a successful television show and the the ear of a soon-to-be second-term president.

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6:09pm

Tue January 8, 2013
It's All Politics

House Gears Up For Immigration Battle

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 7:05 pm

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., the new House Judiciary Committee chairman, is a former immigration attorney who has taken a hard line against Democratic proposals.
Alex Wong Getty Images

With immigration expected to be a top issue in the new Congress, lawmakers in both parties continue to call for a bipartisan approach — while also preparing for battle.

The messaging from many House Democrats and Republicans about the chances of passing an immigration overhaul remains optimistic. And some of them, such as Republican Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida and Democrat Zoe Lofgren of California, have begun to meet privately.

But other moves indicate that lawmakers are hedging their bets and girding for a fight.

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6:50pm

Fri December 28, 2012
It's All Politics

New Immigration Battle: Driver's Licenses

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 7:19 pm

In a sign of growing opposition to President Obama's immigration policy, Iowa has become the latest state to deny driver's licenses to young illegal immigrants who receive deferments from deportation.

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11:42am

Thu December 27, 2012
Race

Census Bureau Rethinks The Best Way To Measure Race

A crowd crosses the street in midtown Manhattan.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Possible revisions to how the decennial census asks questions about race and ethnicity have raised concerns among some groups that any changes could reduce their population count and thus weaken their electoral clout.

The Census Bureau is considering numerous changes to the 2020 survey in an effort to improve the responses of minorities and more accurately classify Latino, Asian, Middle Eastern and multiracial populations.

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5:00pm

Mon December 24, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama Administration Deported Record 1.5 Million People

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 8:34 pm

Employees with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency search Guatemalan immigrants before they are put aboard a deportation flight to Guatemala City on June 24, 2011, in Mesa, Ariz.
John Moore Getty Images

Although President Obama supports setting a path to citizenship for many illegal immigrants, his administration deported a record 1.5 million of them in his first term.

In addition, the latest data released by the government in recent days show that an unprecedented 409,849 people were deported for the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30.

The increase from the previous year occurred despite policy changes ordered by Obama to reduce the deportations of otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants.

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3:14pm

Fri December 7, 2012
News

Black, Latino Groups: It's Our Turn, Mr. President

The National Urban League's Marc Morial (center) joins other civic leaders speaking outside the White House after they met with President Obama last month.
Toby Jorrin AFP/Getty Images

After African-American and Latino voters turned out in record numbers to reelect President Obama, leaders for both groups are turning up the pressure on him to return the favor.

They say that minorities, who put aside their disappointments with Obama's first term to support him again, now expect the president to spend his political capital on policies that will help their communities begin to recover from the recession. In the post-election euphoria, some leaders claim, certain voters are saying, "It's our turn."

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3:06pm

Fri December 7, 2012
The Two-Way

'Jet' Magazine Features Its First Gay Male Couple

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 3:51 pm

Photo from Jet's wedding section.
Via GLAAD

Many African-Americans are buzzing about the latest edition of Jet magazine, which for the first time features a gay male couple in its popular section for wedding announcements.

The magazine's Dec. 10 issue display of Ravi Perry and Paris Prince, who held their wedding ceremony in their backyard in Worcester, Mass., is being praised by LGBT activists and some readers as a societal breakthrough given the magazine's reputation for reflecting traditional black cultural mores for 61 years.

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4:43pm

Wed November 28, 2012
It's All Politics

Hispanic Caucus Rejects Republican Immigration Bills

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 11:54 am

Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and 20 House members make up the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. Here, Menendez speaks in September in Sayreville, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Determined not to be excluded from the post-election bipartisan talk of passing immigration legislation, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus on Wednesday rejected two Republican proposals while outlining its own priorities.

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6:04am

Sun November 25, 2012
U.S.

Despite Talk, Immigration Overhaul Not A Guarantee

Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks during a news conference in the Capitol on Nov. 9. Boehner has said Republican House leaders and Obama "can find the common ground" on immigration policy.
Allison Shelley Getty Images

Now that Republicans are widely embracing an overhaul of immigration laws, even a path to legal status for illegal residents, will their members in Congress follow through?

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3:42pm

Fri October 19, 2012
Presidential Race

For Hispanics, A Question Of Turnout

Latino supporters hold up signs as they attend a campaign rally for President Obama at Sloan's Lake Park in Denver on Oct. 4.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

By now, it's no surprise that most Latinos plan to vote for President Obama. They are the nation's largest minority group, often likened to a sleeping giant that could decide the outcome in key swing states.

But will enough Latinos show up on Election Day to make good on the prediction?

As many as 60,000 Hispanics reach voting age every month, but Latinos overall have yet to bring their full force to the voting booth. Two-thirds of eligible whites and African-Americans voted in the 2008 presidential election, while barely half of Hispanics cast ballots.

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7:10am

Thu October 18, 2012
Election 2012

Republican Governors Gear Up For Election Gains

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie delivers the keynote address during last month's Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. Christie's election in 2009 was part of the first wave of Republican gubernatorial victories.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

While the presidential election consumes the nation's attention, the Republican Party is poised to expand its dominance of state politics with this year's contests for governor.

If predictions of strategists in both parties and polling prove correct, the November elections could give the Republicans their highest number of governors in 91 years.

Among the current governors, 29 are Republicans, 20 Democrats and one is an independent. Next month, Republican candidates could take away as many as five governorships from Democrats.

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11:56am

Fri October 12, 2012
U.S.

Casinos Not An Easy Bet For Local Governments

The MGM Grand Detroit is one of three resort casinos that have opened in the city since 1999.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

More states and cities are turning to casinos to generate revenue and plug budget holes.

The latest to try its luck is Maryland, where groups are waging an expensive campaign over a ballot question that will be put to voters next month. Proponents promise jackpots of jobs and funding for public schools, but analysts say the gamble doesn't always pay off at the levels promised for public coffers.

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5:03pm

Thu October 4, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama's Top Advisers Have Dissed His Debate Chops Before

Despite President Obama's celebrated gift for oratory, the Obama supporters least surprised by his underwhelming performance against Mitt Romney may have been two of his top advisers.

Senior strategists David Plouffe and David Axelrod have long doubted Obama's debating skills. Their concerns date back to the 2008 presidential campaign, as Plouffe wrote in his book, The Audacity to Win. He put it plainly: "Historically, Obama was not a strong debater."

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7:39pm

Tue October 2, 2012
It's All Politics

Setbacks For Voter ID Laws in Pa., Other States Could Be Short-Lived

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:23 pm

Emily Goldberg, with her daughter, Willa, 2, holds up a sign during the NAACP voter ID rally to protest against Pennsylvania's voter ID law on Sept. 13. Tuesday, a judge ordered that the law not be enforced in the Nov. 6 presidential election.
Michael Perez AP

Civil rights groups are cheering the injunction placed on the Pennsylvania voter identification law, but their recent victories against state photo ID measures very likely won't last beyond Election Day.

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6:00pm

Wed September 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Florida, Colorado Voter Purges Net Few Noncitizens, So Far

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 6:53 pm

States using a federal immigration database to purge noncitizens from voter lists are starting to get results, which so far include few illegal voters.

In Florida, which was first to gain access to the database after fighting the federal government in court, an initial run of roughly 2,600 names has turned up "several" violators, according to a spokesman for Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner.

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9:42am

Sun September 2, 2012
Politics

Occupy Plans Resurgence At Democratic Convention

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 1:07 pm

Occupy Wall Street activist Jason Woody listens to a speaker during a rally before the start of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 27.
Steve Nesius Reuters/Landov

As President Obama reintroduces himself to America at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., next week, the Occupy movement will be there trying to do the same.

Remember Occupy Wall Street, originator of the "We are the 99 percent" slogan?

The group, which helped reshape the nation's political discourse last year before falling into disarray and uncertainty, plans to hold a demonstration outside the convention hall in an effort to recapture the spotlight. A Tampa, Fla., Occupy group protested at the Republican convention in there last week.

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12:17pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Election 2012

Foreclosures Leave Holes In Voter Outreach

A home has a foreclosure auction sign displayed in Chagrin Falls, Ohio, in September 2010.
Amy Sancetta AP

The nation's foreclosure crisis rarely is mentioned by the presidential candidates, but it looms large as their campaigns grapple with finding evicted voters in swing states.

Organizers are discovering scores of vacated homes in key battlegrounds that contributed strong turnouts in the 2008 election. In the past four years, more than 3.7 million homes have been lost to foreclosure, according to market research firm CoreLogic.

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6:36pm

Thu August 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Immigration Employees File Suit Against Obama's New Immigration Policy

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:03 pm

The logo of the U.S. Homeland Security Department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement Detention and Removal unit.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

A group of immigration agents on Thursday filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration, claiming that following new lenient deportation policies requires them to violate the law.

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4:46pm

Wed August 15, 2012
It's All Politics

Judge Refuses To Block Pa. Voter ID Law; Appeal Headed To State Supreme Court

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 8:04 pm

Demonstrators hold signs at an NAACP-organized rally on the steps of the Pennsylvania Capitol to protest the state's new voter identification law on July 24 in Harrisburg, Pa.
Marc Levy AP

A judge's decision Wednesday to uphold the new Pennsylvania voter identification law shifted attention to the state's highest court, which could now determine if the requirement will be imposed on Election Day.

Attorneys for the plaintiffs had asked the judge to stop the law from taking effect as part of a constitutional challenge. Their complaint claims the law would make it disproportionately harder for seniors, minorities and others to vote in the Nov. 6 general election.

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4:27pm

Thu August 2, 2012
Election 2012

New Target In Voter ID Battle: 1965 Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 9:49 am

A voter casts his ballot in a West Miami, Fla., fire station during the Republican primary in January.
J Pat Carter AP

A landmark federal law used to block the adoption of state voter identification cards and other election rules now faces unprecedented legal challenges.

A record five federal lawsuits filed this year challenge the constitutionality of a key provision in the Voting Rights Act. The 1965 statute prevents many state and local governments from enacting new voter ID requirements, redistricting plans and similar proposals on grounds that the changes would disenfranchise minorities.

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4:02am

Wed July 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Pa. Won't Use Voter Fraud Argument At Hearing Over ID Law

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 2:30 pm

When Pennsylvania officials begin their defense of the state's new voter identification law in court Wednesday, they will do so after agreeing to abandon a central argument for why such laws are needed.

In a Pennsylvania court filing, the state says it has never investigated claims of in-person voter fraud and so won't argue that such fraud has occurred in the past. As a result, the state says, it has no evidence that the crime has ever been committed.

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3:51pm

Tue July 17, 2012
U.S.

States To Use U.S. Immigration List For Voter Purges

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 5:06 pm

Several presidential battleground states are moving quickly to reach agreements with federal officials to access a U.S. immigration database to purge noncitizens from voter rolls.

The states, including some with large Latino populations, are following Florida, which last week reached its own pact with the Department of Homeland Security to use a database that contains information about immigrants who are in the U.S. legally. The states' efforts had initially been blocked by DHS until the agency relented.

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10:28am

Fri July 13, 2012
Election 2012

How Obama Factors In States Voting On Gay Marriage

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 1:40 pm

President Obama is interviewed from the Cabinet Room of the White House by Robin Roberts on ABC's Good Morning America on May 9. During the interview, Obama expressed his support for gay marriage — a first for a U.S. president.
Pete Souza The White House via Getty Images

President Obama's decision to publicly support same-sex marriage may have changed the minds of some Americans, according to a national poll. But in states that will vote on the issue in November, the impact has been mixed.

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6:09am

Sat July 7, 2012
U.S.

Gridlock: Storms, Blackouts Expose Power Problems

Originally published on Sat July 7, 2012 3:19 pm

A power pole is bent after severe storms hit the Bemidji, Minn., area on Tuesday, knocking down thousands of trees and causing extensive damage to utility lines. Thousands of customers were left without power.
Monte Draper AP

As hundreds of thousands swelter without power a week after a violent storm pummeled the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic, energy experts say the future will look even worse if the nation's aging, congested electrical grid isn't upgraded.

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7:27pm

Tue June 26, 2012
U.S.

Future Murky For Arizona's Immigration Law

A defiant Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio answers questions about the Justice Department's lawsuit against him during a news conference in Phoenix last month.
Ross D. Franklin AP

As Arizona officials prepare to apply the one provision of the state's immigration law upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, some local authorities doubt they can properly enforce it.

"We will do our best to enforce the law. But we are in uncharted territory on this issue," Tucson Police Chief Roberto Villasenor said in a statement released by the Police Executive Research Forum, a nonprofit organization of police chiefs. The group says the law "will seriously undermine local law enforcement."

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6:10pm

Fri June 15, 2012
It's All Politics

President Obama's Immigration Shift Could Bolster Latino Support In November

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 4:00 pm

Supporters of President Obama's announcement on immigration policy rally outside the White House Friday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

President Obama's decision to stop deporting young, otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants could help rebuild his support among electorally important Latinos after 18 months of futile efforts, some activists said Friday.

"There is overwhelming support for the protection of these children, as there is in the rest of the country. I think this could have an energizing effect on Latino voters," says Clarissa Martinez del Castro, director of immigration and national campaigns for National Council of La Raza.

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4:07pm

Wed June 13, 2012
It's All Politics

Fla. Gov. Rick Scott Defends Efforts To Clear Noncitizens From Voter Rolls

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 6:48 pm

"Not one U.S. citizen has been eliminated from the voter rolls," Florida Gov. Rick Scott tells NPR's Michel Martin. "Not one."
Chris O'Meara AP

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is defending his effort to prevent non-U.S. citizens from voting in his state after the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to stop him on Tuesday.

Scott told NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More Wednesday that after learning his state didn't verify the citizenship status of registered voters, he's trying to ensure that the ballots of U.S. citizens aren't diminished:

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