John Weeks

Host, The Nature of Things

John Weeks studied ornithology and wildlife management at Cornell University and earned a graduate degree in plant ecology from Syracuse University. He has served as Conservation Biologist for the NYS Conservation Department; Associate Professor of Biology at SUNY Oswego; Founding Director of The Rogers Environmental Education Center at Sherburne, NY; and Director of the Onondaga Nature Center and Center for Nature Education at Baltimore Woods, Marcellus, NY.  He assisted in the creation of the Cayuga Nature Center and the Sterling Nature Center in Cayuga County near Fair Haven, NY.

Over the years John has written hundreds of nature columns for regional newspapers, and in 1982 began writing and narrating The Nature of Things, his weekly radio program that aired on WRVO for many years and is now available as a series of podcasts at the WRVO website.

Ways to Connect

Staticgirl / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from January 30, 1987, John Weeks pokes fun at the media's fascination with Groundhog's Day and offers a thought as to what Puxatony Phil is actually thinking when he makes his annual appearance.

Alex Butterfield / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from January 13, 1989, John Weeks discusses the return of the moose to New York and the public perception of the animal. Weeks goes into detail on the characteristics that make the moose such a natural mystery.

Ruth Geach / Flickr

Have you ever wondered why we use mistletoe, wreaths, and other ornaments to celebrate the holiday season? Nature may have more of an influence then you might think. Host John Weeks tells nature's holiday story on this archived episode of "Nature of Things," originally aired December 20, 1985. 

Nick J Nixon / Flickr

Plants die off, the ground freezes over, and animals go into hibernation. Although this description of winter may sound dreadful, these aspects are needed to keep our ecosystem in check. On this episode of "Nature of Things" from February 26, 1988, host John Weeks explains why sometimes a tough winter can be a good thing. 

The Positives of Winter

Dec 21, 2016
Kaylyn Izzo / WRVO

According to biostatistics, warmer seasons produce the most beneficial characteristics to the environment. However, winter has many positive aspects that can not be measured in numbers. On this archived episode of the "Nature of Things" from January 27, 1984, host John Weeks discusses the beautiful sights, camaraderie, and fun that can be brought about by winter. 

Local Bird Watching

Dec 14, 2016
Becks / Flickr

Bird watching can be both a relaxing and fascinating hobby. In this archived edition of the "Nature of Things," host John Weeks reveals how you can do this locally. Although originally aired Februrary 24, 1984, much of the same rules apply.

Diana Robinson / Flickr

When it comes to wildlife, Africa is plentiful--home to some of the largest creatures known to man. In this archived broadcast of the "Nature of Things" from January 13, 1984, host John Weeks speaks with Dr. Jack Calvert about his adventure through Africa. 

Anthony Quintano / Flickr

With winter underway, an archived broadcast of the "Nature of Things" from February 3, 1984 helps explain how lake effect storms form. Host John Weeks and weather expert Dr. Alfred Stam, dive into the science behind it, while also sharing some fun facts. Find out the only other region in the world, besides the Finger Lakes, that may experience lake effect storms. 

November's Open

Nov 10, 2016

In this archived broadcast from November 13, 1992, John Weeks discusses the beauty of November, despite the loss of life that comes with the beginning of winter.  Weeks remarks on how the fall and winter are necessary to bring about spring and tells a series of anecdotes about his discovery of various bird nests in the late autumn.

The Loon

Oct 12, 2016

In this archived broadcast from October 9, 1987, John Weeks discusses the common loon and the decrease in the species population.  Weeks touches on the causes of this decrease, the increased interest in the bird, loon behavior, and its incredible voice, including his own account of hearing a loon song.

Phantoms of the Marsh

Oct 5, 2016
James West / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from October 4, 1990, John Weeks discusses the phantoms of the marshes, better known as rails.  Weeks talks about how he stumbled onto their nest and the reaction the birds had to his visits.  Weeks also offers a description of the species.

In this archived broadcast from September 16, 1988, John Weeks talks about the negative perception surrounding hawks and owls, particularly the red tailed hawk.  Weeks talks about the bird's history and his own relationship with attempting to protect the species.

In this archived broadcast from June 29, 1990, John Weeks talks about tulip trees and the Baltimore oriole. He gives a brief history of both species and their modern day roles in the natural world.

In this archived broadcast from June 25, 1992, John Weeks speaks about bird songs and their qualities.  Songs by different species of thrush, wrens, thrasher and others are interspersed throughout the talk.  Weeks examines each song, touching on qualities such as tone and energy.

A Study in Bird Nesting

Jun 8, 2016
Dan Dangler / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 10, 1993, John Weeks discusses the observations he made during a study of a local wetland.  These observations include several notes on the nesting habits of over a dozen different bird species. 

Changes in Birdwatching

Jun 3, 2016
Keith Williams / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 4, 1992, John Weeks discusses some observations in migration patterns he has witnessed while bird watching and offers a metaphor involving his daughter moving to a new home.

Flying Architects

Jun 1, 2016
Henry T. McLin / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 7, 1991, John Weeks discusses nature's flying architects, commonly known as birds.  Weeks covers the nest building of several species including Baltimore orioles and hummingbirds.

Mice

May 27, 2016
Michael Becker / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 27, 2005, John Weeks discusses the role mice play in maintaining an ecosystem.  Weeks goes into detail on how mice provide meals for several predator species and how this makes mice important members of the natural world.

Celebrating Nature's Art

May 25, 2016
covrazio / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 23, 2003, John Weeks discusses some of the local nature art exhibits.  Weeks talks about the Great Swamp Conservancy and the Sterling Nature Center, among other topics.

Strange Sounds of Nature

May 20, 2016
Tom Moseley / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 21, 2004, John Weeks reviews the strange sounds one might hear on a spring evening.  Weeks goes into depth on the calls of the pie-billed grebe, the woodcock, the rough grouse and more.

An Episode with Deer

May 18, 2016
Andrew Reding / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 17, 1991, John Weeks recalls an encounter he had with several deer while walking a nature trail. 

Nature Trails

May 18, 2016
Don Rogers / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 20, 2005, John Weeks discusses local nature trails.  Weeks touches on his hand in constructing the trail designs and gives accounts of experiences he's had on these trails. 

The Aftermath of Winter

May 13, 2016

In this archived broadcast from May 9, 2003, John Weeks talks about the aftermath of winter.  Weeks remarks on the visible marks that winter leaves behind each year and how that effects the natural world. 

Len Blumin / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 13, 2005, John Weeks discusses the ivory-billed woodpecker.  Weeks goes over the bird's history and its appearance's rarity.

Salamanders

May 6, 2016
Fyn Kynd Photography / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 2, 2003, John Weeks discusses salamanders.  Weeks goes into detail on the different species living in New York and talks about some encounters he has had over the years.

Woodland Flower Show

May 4, 2016
Jean-Pierre Chamberland / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 4, 1984, John Weeks discusses the beauty that comes with spring flowers.  Weeks takes a journey where he searches for various spring flowers and gives details on various species.

Brian Rogers / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 25, 2003, John Weeks discusses how spending his youth on a farm shaped his love of sparrows.  Weeks talks about his own enjoyment of the bird and describes how to find them in order to listen to their songs.

Healthy Soil and Mud

Apr 27, 2016

In this archived broadcast from April 26, 2002, John Weeks talks about the beauty of soil and mud.  Weeks discusses the roles soil and mud play in spring and the benefits of healthy soil.

Saffron Blaze / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 15, 1988, John Weeks discusses the virtues of roadside nature watching.  Weeks talks about the sights of spring that can easily be found from your vehicle. 

In this archived broadcast from April 18, 1987, John Weeks continues to discuss his trip on the East Coast.  Weeks discusses his visit Bombay Hook, touching on the wildlife he spotted and giving a brief history of the refuge.

Pages