John Weeks

Host, The Nature of Things

John Weeks studied ornithology and wildlife management at Cornell University and earned a graduate degree in plant ecology from Syracuse University. He has served as Conservation Biologist for the NYS Conservation Department; Associate Professor of Biology at SUNY Oswego; Founding Director of The Rogers Environmental Education Center at Sherburne, NY; and Director of the Onondaga Nature Center and Center for Nature Education at Baltimore Woods, Marcellus, NY.  He assisted in the creation of the Cayuga Nature Center and the Sterling Nature Center in Cayuga County near Fair Haven, NY.

Over the years John has written hundreds of nature columns for regional newspapers, and in 1982 began writing and narrating The Nature of Things, his weekly radio program that aired on WRVO for many years and is now available as a series of podcasts at the WRVO website.

Ways To Connect

In this archived broadcast from May, 2, 1991, John Weeks talks about migration and nesting. He goes into great detail on birds and the nesting time of year. He narrates his walk and pioneer trail that he went on. He talks about Song Sparrows and how they use sound to get the attention of other birds around them. He runs through different birds and the sounds that make them unique.

In this archived broadcast from August 17, 1984, John Weeks talks to the Director of Recreation for the Onondaga County park system. Weeks interviews him and asks him about his job and what is up and coming for the Onondaga County parks.

Spring A Dialogue

20 hours ago

In this archived broadcast from April 19, 1991, John Weeks follows a dialogued format where he talks about how much he loves the spring and how he is not that interested in winter because he is old and looses track of things. He talks about his childhood and an illness in the spring that his mother was going through. He talks about what he used to do during the spring when he was younger and why it is his favorite time of year.

Good Hawk

20 hours ago

In this archived broadcast from May 20,1993, John Weeks talks about the hawk and how its a bird that slips through peoples mind. He talks about his days studying birds at Cornell University. He also talks about the relationship between hunters and hawks.

In this archived broadcast from June 10, 1988, John Weeks talks about how in the beginning of the summer the calico fields start to blossom. Weeks talks in detail about the origin of calico fields. He talks about the various contrasting colors in spring and summer. He talks about the different flowers that blossom throughout the season as well. 

In this archived broadcast from July 12, 1991, John Weeks talks about the Cicero swamp and how the environment and the harvest balance out. He stresses the importance of keeping the environment healthy and he also talks about logging and taking up land.

Talking About Spring

Apr 19, 2015

In this archived broadcast from March 13, 1987, John Weeks talks about the upcoming spring season. He talks about the effects of the melting snow. He also talks about climate and how when the seasons change it effects our environment. He talks about how the changing of seasons affects farmers and land. He also talks about how spring changes with the months.

In this archived broadcast from August 9, 1990, John Weeks talks about how birds and sunflowers interconnect. He also talks about the dynamics of sunflowers and what they provide to our lives. He talks about different type of sunflowers and what makes them unique.

In this archived broadcast from July 20, 1990, John Weeks talks about the development of butterflies and their purpose in wild life. He talks about a trip he took to Georgia and went to the butterfly house at Callaway Gardens. He also talks about the birth of butterflies and goes into details about the things he saw at the butterfly house. Weeks says that when looking at butterflies you will experience unexpected rewards.

In this archived broadcast from October 11th, 1990, John Weeks discusses what makes leaves green and what causes them to change colors. As leaves grow and change until they fall of during Autumn, an intricate and important cycle has occurred. He describes the different colors and what they signify.

In this archived broadcast from October 2nd, 1992, John Weeks talks about a conference he attend in Lake George for the New York State Outdoor Education Association. He used the trip to the conference as an excuse to roadside nature watch. He describes the colors he sees at the leaves show signs of beginning to change.

John Weeks discusses his devotion to the environment. He explains how caring about water, food, and atmosphere now can improve the future. It is all linked together and we have a great amount of control for  what will happen in the future.

South Carolina Sunrise

Sep 11, 2014

John Weeks describes the sounds of nature and the animals that come out of the woods as the sun rises. He comments on how the activity level of nature changes as the sun comes out.

John Weeks takes a walk through the woods and describes the different birds he hears and what their songs mean. He discusses the different pitches of the birds as they interact with each other.

John Weeks continues the story of a maple tree near his house. He describes how the tree was cut and how old the tree was. He tells the story of the trees life and growth. He explains even though trees offer shade and beauty, they are much more important than that.

John Weeks discusses visiting home and returning to sentimental places. He comments on all of the changes since his last visit. The changes in nature offer a look into what the environment will be like for future generations.

John Weeks tells a story about a tree close to his house. He appreciates this tree because it shades his house from the hottest days of the summer. The tree was damaged earlier in it's life and never recovered. The tree might be cut down for a highway.

John Weeks talks about different kinds of birds, especially robins, and the fruits they eat. Fruit is important this time of year as a main source for the energy they need to migrate in the Fall. Their behavior changes towards the end of the summer as they prepare for their long flight.

John Weeks explains how he views nature as art and compares it to a painting. He describes how it changes throughout the day and how the height of the sun is key to the "perfect picture." The height of the sun and the presence or lack of clouds create different hues of colors and shadows that create contrast.

John Weeks talks with director of recreation and public programs, Bob Geraci, about the different parks in Onondaga county. They address how the various parks are classified and different activities that go on at each one. 

John Weeks talks about the approaching fall season and the summer sunlight cycle. He discusses the relationship between the sun and plants and how that changes as we go through the different seasons.

Natural Insect Control

Aug 11, 2014

John Weeks discusses different kinds of birds and their foraging habits that he witnesses in his own yard. He talks about how many trips they make in a day from their nest to the yard and how with each trip, they are acting as a form of insect control. He argues that birds are better to depend on for insect control because insects do not develop an immunity to them.

John Weeks tells a story about a woman who found a Heron in her yard. He talks about the various types of Herons which are often unknown by many people. Each Heron differs in size and color to help it blend in to specific surroundings.

As The Earth Turns

Aug 5, 2014

John Weeks talks about his hometown of Albion, NY. He reflects on what it was like when he lived there and how it has changed from what he remembers. He discusses how people who live there now see the town differently because their experience is different due to the world turning and the seasons changing.

John Weeks discusses how the different predators and prey find their food. He also talks about how different animals communicate and warn each other of danger. He expresses that upon entering the woods, a person never knows what just occurred between the creatures that make up the forest.

Lessons In The Lakes

May 13, 2014

In this archived broadcast from August 3, 1984, John Weeks talks about a ride his wife and him took on one of the lakes as an anniversary gift from his children. He talks about the boat tour that they went on and what the lake is like compared to different lakes. Weeks says that he wishes they heard more about the lake and what makes it what it is.

In this archived broadcast from September  25, 1992, John Weeks talks about how he has 33 years of professional service and had more than 500 episodes of the Nature Of Things. He was awarded the conservation educator of the year and how he was surprised to get this award.  Weeks also talks about someone else that he meets at the award ceremony.

In this archived broadcast from September 11, 1992, John Weeks talks about waking up early one morning and how he wanted to see what difference a shift of 12 degrees in latitude would make. Weeks said that he woke up too early and that the stars were still shining in the sky but eventually the fog and dew were heavy enough to blur the street lights. He talks about the different sounds that he hears from the birds as well as the grasshoppers and the flowers that he sees.

eugene beckes / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 18, 1992, John Weeks talks about the sound that birds make and how you can hear them everywhere. He especially talks about a tiny,  energetic bird called a wren. He mentions the kinglet as well. Both these birds are very high pitched. The wren is a retiring bird and they have a long song. Weeks then talks about what he is seeing and what the wren looks like.

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