Merrit Kennedy

Austrian officials say the government will attempt to seize the house where Adolf Hitler was born. The Austrian government, which rents it now, has tried for years to purchase the property from its current owner.

"The aim is to prevent the property from falling into the hands of neo-Nazis," Kerry Skyring in Vienna tells NPR's Newscast unit. "Now, the interior ministry says the only way to ensure it does not fall into the wrong hands is to requisition it."

Austrian officials say the government will attempt to seize the house where Adolf Hitler was born. The Austrian government, which rents it now, has tried for years to purchase the property from its current owner.

"The aim is to prevent the property from falling into the hands of neo-Nazis," Kerry Skyring in Vienna tells NPR's Newscast unit. "Now, the interior ministry says the only way to ensure it does not fall into the wrong hands is to requisition it."

"Well, it's not been a great week," British Prime Minister David Cameron said at his party's spring forum on Saturday, after the leaked Panama Papers revealed that his late father ran an offshore fund. "I could have handled this better. I know there are lessons to learn, and I will learn them."

Meanwhile, hundreds of protesters calling for Cameron's resignation rallied near his residence, 10 Downing Street.

Larry Miller in London tells NPR's Newscast unit how this escalated:

"Well, it's not been a great week," British Prime Minister David Cameron said at his party's spring forum on Saturday, after the leaked Panama Papers revealed that his late father ran an offshore fund. "I could have handled this better. I know there are lessons to learn, and I will learn them."

Meanwhile, hundreds of protesters calling for Cameron's resignation rallied near his residence, 10 Downing Street.

Larry Miller in London tells NPR's Newscast unit how this escalated:

North Korea claims that it has conducted a successful test of an engine for an intercontinental ballistic missile, which it says would boost its ability to carry out a nuclear attack on the U.S.

It's not possible to verify the claim, which follows a series of weapons tests from the isolated nation.

If navigating your tax return has remained on the back burner until now, you can stretch the process out for three more days this year. That's right: This year's deadline is actually April 18.

This is all because of a fortuitous overlap of federal and state holidays with the usual April 15 due date.

If navigating your tax return has remained on the back burner until now, you can stretch the process out for three more days this year. That's right: This year's deadline is actually April 18.

This is all because of a fortuitous overlap of federal and state holidays with the usual April 15 due date.

Two men were killed in a shooting at an Air Force base in Texas, according to military and local law enforcement officials. Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland was briefly locked down following reports of an active shooter early Friday.

"What we know is that we have two victims right now, we're going through our process and procedures, and once we make a formal determination through the investigation we will let you know," Air Force Brig. Gen. Robert LaBrutta said at a news conference Friday.

ISIS has conducted a mass kidnapping of industrial workers near Syria's capital, Damascus, according to Syrian state media and an independent rights group.

There are conflicting reports about how many people were taken from the al-Badiyeh Cement Co., located northwest of Damascus in the town of Dumeir. NPR's Alison Meuse tells our Newscast Unit that the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says 170 people were kidnapped, but Syrian state media puts that number at more than 300.

We're catching up on the news from northwest Oklahoma, where a massive wildfire continues to rage in Woodward County.

Video emerged earlier this week of two KWTV News 9 journalists dramatically rescuing a road grader operator from the flames.

You can see the fire moving closer to the road grader, as the operator rolls it back and forth, trying to free it from a ditch.

"He needs to get out. ... He can't get out. Come on, guy!" Amy Castor tells Val Castor (who happens to be her husband) while they watch the man struggle.

A new law in France makes it a crime to pay for sex.

Under the law, passed Wednesday, "customers will face fines and be made to attend awareness classes on the harms of the sex trade," The Associated Press reports. Clients will be fined about $1,700 for the first offense — and that increases to more than $4,250 on the second.

France's sex workers union strongly opposes the legislation, saying it puts them at greater risk. The new law, which has been billed as a comprehensive approach to reducing sex work, has received a mixed response from rights groups.

Princeton University's board of trustees has decided that it will not remove Woodrow Wilson's name from its School of Public and International Affairs and from a residential college, despite student protests over the former president's segregationist views.

Joseph Medicine Crow, a Native American historian and the last war chief of the Crow Tribe of Montana, has died. He was 102.

Medicine Crow earned the title war chief "for his deeds in Europe in World War II, which included stealing enemy horses and showing mercy on a German soldier he could have killed," Montana Public Radio's Eric Whitney reports.

He was also a living link to the 1876 Battle of the Little Bighorn, having heard direct testimony from someone who took part in the battle and later chronicling it as a historian.

The parent company of Alaska Airlines has struck a deal to buy Virgin America, creating a West Coast-focused airline. If approved by regulators and Virgin America's shareholders, the combined airline will be the fifth-largest U.S. carrier, according to Alaska Air Group.

"By bringing them together, we're creating the premier airline for people who live anywhere on the West Coast," Alaska Air Group CEO Brad Tilden said in a statement.

The European Union has started deporting migrants from Greece as part of its controversial deal with Turkey. The agreement, aimed at stemming the massive flow of migrants into the EU, has been widely criticized by rights groups.

Joanna Kakissis on the Greek island of Lesbos tells our Newscast unit that three ferries left the islands of Lesbos and Chios this morning, accompanied by officers from Frontex, the EU border agency.

The CIA "inadvertently left" explosive material on a school bus after a training exercise with local law enforcement in Loudoun County, Va., the agency and the country sheriff's office say.

The U.S. economy gained 215,000 jobs in March, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says in its monthly report released Friday. The unemployment rate rose slightly to 5 percent, up from 4.9 percent in the month before.

"The increase in the unemployment rate came because we had more people looking for work," economist Gus Faucher of PNC Financial Services tells our Newscast unit.

A Virginia State trooper who was shot multiple times at a Greyhound bus station in Richmond, Va., Thursday has died from his injuries, according to Virginia State Police Superintendent Col. Steven Flaherty.

South Africa's top court has found that President Jacob Zuma is liable for a portion of some $20 million in public funds spent on what he called a security upgrade to his private residence.

The Department of Justice announced Wednesday that it has reached an agreement with Newark, N.J., on changes to the city's police department.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast unit that this comes after "civil rights investigators had uncovered a pattern of unconstitutional stops and property thefts." She adds:

"The Justice Department team studied thousands of unjustified stops and searches by the Newark police that had a disparate impact on minorities.

French President Francois Hollande is abandoning a proposed constitutional amendment that would have allowed the government to strip convicted terrorists of their French citizenship.

"A compromise appears out of reach on the stripping of terrorists' nationality," Hollande told reporters, according to AFP. "I also note that a section of the opposition is hostile to any constitutional revision. I deeply regret this attitude."

Just over a year ago, a Saudi-led coalition started a major offensive in Yemen in support of the country's embattled President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi. The coalition airstrikes are aimed at pushing back the Shiite Houthi rebels, who swept down from northern Yemen in 2014 and took control of major portions of the country.

But it's not just two warring sides – southern separatists and powerful tribes also have a stake in the fight. And an al-Qaida branch and a burgeoning ISIS affiliate have benefited from the violence.

New York state has joined the cities of Seattle, San Francisco and New York in restricting non-essential public-employee travel to North Carolina. The moves are in response to a newly passed North Carolina law that critics say is discriminatory to the LGBT community.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's executive order bans "all taxpayer-funded trips trip to North Carolina, unless they're essential to public health or law enforcement," NPR's Hansi Lo Wang tells our Newscast unit.

Cypriot authorities say they have arrested the hijacker of an EgyptAir plane after an hours-long standoff in Larnaca, Cyprus. All the passengers and crew had been released.

The man's motivations are still murky. Cypriot officials describe the suspected hijacker as "unstable" and tell NPR that he wanted to speak to his Cyprus-based ex-wife. He later requested political asylum, they say. Cyprus' Ministry of Foreign Affairs identified the man as Seif Eldin Mustafa. Earlier news reports had identified a different man.

The American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina and several other plaintiffs have filed a federal lawsuit over a North Carolina law they say discriminates against the state's LGBT community.

The law, passed last week in a special session by the state's Legislature and signed by Gov. Pat McCrory, blocks "local governments from passing anti-discrimination rules to grant protections to gay and transgender people," as we reported.

After a suicide bombing ripped through a crowded park on Easter evening in the city of Lahore, Pakistan has declared an official three-day mourning period. Meanwhile, authorities are trying to track down those responsible for the attack that killed at least 70 people.

A splinter group of the Pakistani Taliban, Jamaat-ul-Ahrar, has claimed responsibility for the attack. As we reported, a spokesman for the group said it was intended to target Christians.

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, facing mounting pressure from corporations with interests in his state, said Monday that he will veto a controversial "religious liberties" bill.

Belgian federal prosecutors said Monday they have charged three more people with participating in a terrorist group, following Tuesday's deadly attacks at Brussels' airport and a metro station.

NPR's Melissa Block tells our Newscast unit that the new charges come after a series of raids around Brussels.

The Nigerian army claims to have rescued more than 800 hostages from Boko Haram, the militant group that has held major swathes of territory in the country.

NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast Unit that it "was not immediately clear whether the rescues included any of the 200 schoolgirls kidnapped nearly two years ago [who inspired] the #BringBackOurGirls movement." Here's more from Gregory:

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has signed a bill that makes his state the second to ban abortion because of a fetal abnormality. The measure also criminalizes the procedure when motivated solely because of factors such as the fetus's sex or race.

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