Ryan Delaney

Reporter, Innovation Trail, Central New York

Ryan Delaney works on the Innovation Trail project - covering technology, economic development, startups and other issues relating to New York's innovation economy.

Ryan began his public radio career working for WAER in Syracuse while still in college, where his work was honored by the Syracuse Press Club. He then returned to Syracuse, N.Y. from Albany where he worked at WAMC. Prior to that, Ryan filed stories for The Allegheny Front in Pittsburgh.

His reporting has also been heard on NPR, Vermont Public Radio and New Hampshire Public Radio.

Ryan grew up in Burlington, Vt. He has a degree in broadcast journalism and international relations from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and Maxwell School at Syracuse University.

Ways To Connect

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Dan Pacheco is able to steer a small drone above a group of students with just a WiFi connection and his iPad. What the drone sees is projected onto a big screen in front of them.

Courtesy Connective Corridor

Red modern-looking street lamps, bright green bike lanes and smoothly paved roadways now stretch from Syracuse University to the edge of the city's downtown.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Speaking on a brief visit to Rochester on Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he didn't believe that the NY SAFE ACT OF 2013 passed on Tuesday would impact on jobs at Remington Arms in upstate New York.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

A new startup competition with a global profile is underway in Syracuse - its first U.S. location.

Richard Hanna for Congress

Rep. Richard Hanna, R-Barneveld, is taking a bit of a wait-and-see approach to new gun control legislation, but he has gotten the opinion of at least one high school class in his district.

The main economic booster engine for central New York is predicting economic growth in the region in 2013 will look a lot like last year.

Business executives from across upstate New York are less confident about the economy going into 2013, an annual survey has found.

While the Fiscal Cliff deal passed by Congress at the turn of the New Year raised taxes on some of the wealthiest people in America, it left many tax breaks in place that benefit small businesses. That is, along as they take advantage of them.

Boston Public Library / via Flickr

A long-closed historic downtown Syracuse building may have a new buyer, as someone has triggered the foreclosure process on the Mizpah Tower.

Sarah Harris / NCPR

With several tax credits and incentives for the wind industry extended by Congress for at least another year, wind projects in upstate New York can move forward with a little more confidence.

jovelstefan / via Flickr

As far as weather measurements go, Syracuse crushed its old record for the warmest year ever recorded. Central New Yorkers dealt with the warmest temperatures in more than 80 years during 2012.

The city of Syracuse has reduced the number of city workers it has on the rolls of a non-city run agency as a way of skirting civil service rules.

lizard10979 / via Flickr

If you're putting away Christmas decorations and taking ornaments off the tree, Onondaga County's recycling agency wants to make sure that old tree gets re-purposed.

Landmark Theatre

Most major centers for the arts, like an old theater downtown, usually don't turn a profit. They're not really expected to. But last month at a forum at downtown Syracuse's Landmark Theatre, the argument was made that grandiose theaters shouldn't be viewed as charities.

wander.lust / via Flickr

Congress seems to have reached a deal to stop milk prices from rising to a warned about $6 a gallon in the New Year, but it's unclear if it will be voted on before the end of 2012.

Colleges and universities are becoming an even bigger part of upstate New York's economy, according to a new report by a group that represents private institutions in the state.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

You don't have to know the answer to every question. And a little cartoon dog named Sam will pop up to let you know if you messed something up.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

The historic F.X. Matt Brewery, maker of the popular Saranac line of beers, is getting more "green" next month. It won't be making green beer on a regular basis, as some brewers do for St. Patrick's Day, but it will flip the switch on a new anaerobic digester.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Construction cranes poke above the already looming structure of St. Joseph's Hospital on the north side of Syracuse. Women in hospital scrubs and men in reflective vests and hard hats walk past, but Dominic Robinson is facing the other direction.

Last night's rainfall was not a welcome sound for Peter Harris, owner of Song Mountain in Tully.

New York's senior senator, Charles Schumer, announced this afternoon that more than 700 jobs will remain at a manufacturer near Syracuse despite the company's recent takeover.

The Syracuse Common Council voted Monday to give the city's newly formed land bank a loan for startup costs and to share property tax revenue so the land bank can function over the long term, but some felt the details of those plans left a lot to be desired.

Jinjian Liang / via Flickr

It began sending out foreclosure notices for the first time last month, but a long-term funding source for Syracuse and Onondaga County's newly formed land bank is just starting to come into focus; though some details remain to be worked out.

Mercury levels among fish caught in the Atlantic Ocean are dropping, but it's not the same case for fish from the Pacific Ocean.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Even though dredging and capping operations to clean up contamination in Onondaga Lake is in its early stages, a scientist consulting on the project says mercury levels are dropping better than expected.

courtesy / MEADS-AMD

Money for the final year of a missile system that supports a few hundred jobs for a defense contractor near Syracuse has been removed from Congress' defense budget. But Lockheed Martin is keeping optimistic that the money could find its way back into the budget.

scottwdw / via Flickr

Some of the money collected through the tax break agreement between the Destiny USA mega-mall and Syracuse will be used to try and win federal funding for Inner Harbor improvements. The Syracuse Industrial Development Agency (SIDA) has approved the use of $500,000 from Destiny payments to be part of a match for a federal grant the city is applying for.

The Syracuse Common Council has proposed loaning the newly formed city-county land bank money so it can begin operating in earnest, but questions remain on the availability of those funds.

A hookah lounge on Syracuse's north side will not be reopening for a second time. The Common Council has rejected a permit for the business to do so.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Microphone in hand, hopeful entrepreneurs began their pitches: a way to track when the next bus is coming, a more portable sailboat, a social network for food lovers.

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