Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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2:55pm

Wed September 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Discovery Of Massive Aquifers Could Be Game Changer For Kenya

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:07 pm

Members of the El Molo tribe are pictured in the village of Komote, on the shores of Lake Turkana, northern Kenya, last year.
Carl De Souza AFP/Getty Images

Satellite imagery and seismic data have identified two huge underground aquifers in Kenya's drought-prone north, a discovery that could be "a game changer" for the country, NPR's Gregory Warner reports.

The aquifers, located hundreds of feet underground in the Turkana region that borders Ethiopia and South Sudan, contain billions of gallons of water, according to UNESCO, which confirmed the existence of the subterranean lakes discovered with the help of a French company using technology originally designed to reveal oil deposits.

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1:13pm

Wed September 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Chinese Premier Says Foreign Companies To Get 'Equal Treatment'

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:25 pm

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) listens to Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong during a meeting last month.
How Hwee Young AP

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has pledged to treat foreign multinational companies on a par with the country's own state-owned enterprises, but he warned that an economic rebound remains fragile.

Li, speaking at a business forum in the northeastern city of Dalian on Wednesday, cautioned that the global economic outlook was a "complex situation" and outlined a series of steps designed to keep the country on a moderate but sustainable growth path.

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11:38am

Wed September 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Series Reveals Underground Market For 'Re-Homing' Adoptees

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 2:40 pm

In an exhaustive, 18-month investigation, Reuters has detailed a practice in the U.S. of "private re-homing" of unwanted foreign adoptees and allegations of sexual and physical abuse at the hands of guardians.

In the five-part series "The Child Exchange: Inside America's underground market for adopted children," Reuters tracked down several adopted children who it says had been passed from one guardian to another through contacts made on groups on Yahoo and Facebook specializing in such re-homing.

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6:02pm

Tue September 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Study Says America's Income Gap Widest Since Great Depression

John Moore Getty Images

The gap between the 1 percent and the 99 percent is growing, according to an analysis of IRS figures by an international group of university economists, and it hasn't been so wide since 1928.

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4:50pm

Tue September 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Beijing To Crack Down On Social Media 'Slanderous Rumors'

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 8:15 pm

An Internet cafe in Beijing photographed last year.
Greg Baker dapd

China will jail anyone caught using social media to spread "slanderous rumors" or "false information" for up to 10 years, according to a new legal interpretation of Internet restrictions, the official Xinhua news agency reports.

A court's interpretation says the spread of such rumors could automatically incur a three-year prison term, but if the post is read by 5,000 or more people and/or shared more than 500 times, the penalty could jump to 10 years in jail.

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2:46pm

Tue September 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Apple Unveils New iPhones — One Innovative, One Cheap

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:40 pm

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks about pricing for the new iPhone during an Apple product announcement on Tuesday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Apple unveiled its replacement for the iPhone 5 — one for the top end of the market that features an innovative new fingerprint security device, a faster processor and longer battery life; and a second budget phone that will retail for as low as $99.

CEO Tim Cook was joined by other Apple executives at the Cupertino, Calif., headquarters for the long-anticipated and hyped announcement of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c.

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6:58pm

Fri September 6, 2013
The Two-Way

Top Afghan Militant Reportedly Killed In U.S. Drone Strike

Protesters in Pakistan shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest in July against drone strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas.
Arif Ali AFP/Getty Images

A senior leader of the al-Qaida-linked Haqqani network — considered one of the most dangerous factions fighting American troops in Afghanistan — has been killed in a U.S. drone strike over northwestern Pakistan, officials say.

Sangeen Zadran was among five people killed at a compound in the North Waziristan tribal region when a missile fired from a U.S. drone hit the building, Pakistani intelligence officials said.

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2:26pm

Fri September 6, 2013
The Two-Way

Deep In The Pacific, Scientists Discover Biggest Volcano On Earth

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:10 pm

Tamu Massif 3D map
William Sager University of Houston

The world's largest volcano has until now been lurking undiscovered in the depths of the Pacific Ocean, according to a team of scientists who identified the massive object and reported their findings in the latest issue of Nature Geoscience.

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6:28pm

Thu September 5, 2013
The Two-Way

German Police Raid Christian Sect For Alleged Child Abuse

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:31 pm

View of the village of Klosterzimmern near Deiningen, Germany on Friday. The village is home to the religious community 'Zwoelf Staemme' ('Twelve Tribes').
Daniel Karmann EPA/Landov

Two communities affiliated with a U.S.-founded Christian sect have been raided by German police, who removed 40 children after allegations of abuse.

Officials say they acted after receiving evidence of ongoing child abuse at the two communities in Bavaria belonging to the Twelve Tribes, according to Germany's Spiegel Online.

According to the BBC, more than 100 officers were part of the operation to remove the children, who were placed in temporary foster homes.

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1:25pm

Thu September 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Iran's President Wished Jews 'A Blessed Rosh Hashanah.' Or Did He?

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 10:12 am

Did Iranian President Hassan Rouhani tweet a greeting to the world's Jews on Rosh Hashana?
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

It sounded a bit far-fetched, and perhaps it was.

Iran's former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad denied the Holocaust and threatened to wipe Israel off the map. But his successor, President Hassan Rouhani, considered a relative moderate by contrast, has taken a somewhat softer tone. So, when Rouhani allegedly tweeted the following, it quickly became news:

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11:23am

Thu September 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Fog Blamed For 100-Plus Vehicle Pileup In U.K.

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 11:47 am

Recovery workers vehicles back the front of the Sheppey crossing bridge after 100 or more vehicles were involved in a major road traffic incident in Sheppey, Kent, southeast England on Thursday.
Justin Tallis AFP/Getty Images

As many as 130 vehicles were involved in a massive pileup on a fog-covered bridge in Kent, England, that resulted in dozens of injuries along a major traffic artery.

Eight motorists suffered serious injuries in the morning rush-hour accident that closed down the A249 Sheppey Crossing, which is southeast of London.

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3:48pm

Wed September 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Senate Panel Passes Authorization For Force Against Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 8:05 pm

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., listens as the committee's ranking Republican, Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, speaks before Wednesday's vote.
Susan Walsh AP

A Senate panel has voted to approve a resolution giving President Obama the authority to carry out punitive strikes against Syria for its use of chemical weapons.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved the authorization by a 10-7 vote, with one senator voting present. The measure must be passed by a vote of the full Senate to come into force. The vote is likely to take place next week.

The vote marks the first time lawmakers have voted to authorize military action since the October 2002 vote giving President George W. Bush authority to invade Iraq.

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2:39pm

Wed September 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Economy Expanding At Moderate Rate, Fed Says

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:59 pm

Doors for a Chevy Sonic hang on the assembly line at General Motors' Orion Assembly Plant in Lake Orion, Michigan, in 2011.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

The U.S. economy held steady with "modest to moderate" growth between early July and late August, as Americans bought more cars and auto factories ramped up hiring.

The Federal Reserve's so-called Beige Book, comprising reports from 12 geographic districts around the country, showed that manufacturing activity "expanded modestly" and that several districts reported that "demand for inputs related to autos, housing, and infrastructure were strong."

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12:55pm

Wed September 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Lights Out In Venezuela; President Blames Opposition Saboteurs

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:57 pm

Fans wait for play to resume Tuesday at a FIBA World Cup qualifying basketball game in Caracas, Venezuela. A blackout left about 70 percent of the country without electricity.
Ariana Cubillos AP

Venezuela's President Nicholas Maduro said a massive power outage that plunged most of the country into darkness Tuesday, causing traffic chaos in the bustling capital of Caracas, was due to sabotage.

Officials said 70 percent of the country was without electricity, shutting down traffic lights and partially disrupting the underground transport system.

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11:58am

Wed September 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Texas, Mississippi National Guard Won't Process Same-Sex Claims

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:39 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, pictured last month in Orlando, Fla., has said the Texas National Guard must follow state law despite a Department of Defense policy directive on same-sex marriage benefits.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

The Texas and Mississippi National Guards are refusing to process benefits claims for same-sex couples, despite a Department of Defense directive to the contrary.

Maj. Gen. John Nichols, commander of the Texas forces, made the announcement Tuesday, saying the state's Family Code conflicts with the Defense directive that was issued last month in response to a Supreme Court decision striking down a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA.

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11:28am

Wed September 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Sprinter Usain Bolt Says He'll Retire After 2016 Olympics

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:16 pm

Usain Bolt of Jamaica sprints to victory and a new world record in the men's 4x100 meter relay at the 2011 IAAF World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea.
Mark Dadswell Getty Images

Usain Bolt, the Jamaican sprinter widely regarded as the fastest man alive, says he's thinking about hanging up his running shoes after the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The 27-year-old holds world records in the 100 and 200 meters and has six Olympic gold medals. But Bolt says that before retiring, he'd like to win gold in Rio de Janeiro as well as at next year's Commonwealth Games and best his own world record in the 200.

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4:17pm

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Egypt Charges Former President Mohammed Morsi, Others

Mohammed Morsi in January of this year. He's been in custody since his ouster in July.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Egypt's top prosecutor has referred ousted President Mohammed Morsi to trial on charges of inciting deadly violence against his opponents.

State television said Sunday that Morsi, senior Muslim Brotherhood leader Essam el-Erian, former presidential aides and advisors Assad Sheikha and Ahmed Abdel-Ati were among those charged in connection with clashes Dec. 5, 2012 at the presidential palace.

In all, 14 individuals have been referred to a Cairo criminal court, according to Sky News.

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1:45pm

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Another Chinese Official Caught Up In Corruption Probe

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 7:52 pm

Jiang Jiemin, left, is the latest Chinese official to come under scrutiny for possible corruption.
Kin Cheung Associated Press

Another high-level corruption probe has begun in China even as the trial of former regional Chinese Communist Party boss Bo Xilai was apparently still underway.

Jiang Jiemin, the head of the commission that oversees state-owned companies, is suspected of a "serious violation of discipline" related to his top job at the China National Petroleum Corporation.

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11:27am

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Radioactive Water Leak At Fukushima Worse Than First Thought

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:48 am

This photo taken Aug. 6 shows local government officials and nuclear experts at Fukushima after contaminated water was discovered.
AFP/Getty Images

Radiation surrounding Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant has increased 18-fold following a report last month that radioactive water had leaked into the ground around the plant, which was badly damaged in a 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Tokyo Electric Power Co., which owns the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, reports that radiation around the site is at 1,800 millisieverts per hour, a level that Reuters says is "enough to kill an exposed person in four hours."

Previously, the utility, also known as Tepco, said the leaking water was at around 100 millisieverts per hour.

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9:29am

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Kerry: Tests Indicate Sarin Used In Syria

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 4:46 pm

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a statement about the use of chemical weapons in Syria at the Department of State last week.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Secretary of State John Kerry says that tests have shown evidence of Syria's use of the chemical agent sarin in an attack on the opposition last month that the White House has blamed on the regime of President Bashar al-Assad.

"I can share with you today that blood and hair samples that have come to us through an appropriate chain of custody from East Damascus, from first responders, it has tested positive for signatures of sarin," Kerry told CNN on Sunday.

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8:42am

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Syrian Media Declares 'Historic American Retreat'

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 9:09 am

Syrian refugees pass through the Turkish Cilvegozu gate border on Sunday.
Gregorio Borgia Associated Press

Syrian state media on Sunday reacted to President Obama's decision to ask Congress for authorization to strike President Bashar al-Assad's regime, calling the move the start of a U.S. retreat.

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8:04am

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

Ailing Mandela Is Sent Home In Critical Condition

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 7:51 pm

Nelson Mandela photographed during a lunch to Benefit the Mandela Children's Foundation in April 2009 in Cape Town, South Africa.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Nelson Mandela, still in critical condition with a chronic lung infection, was discharged from a hospital Sunday and taken by ambulance to his home in Johannesburg after three months of intensive care. The former South African president and anti-apartheid leader is 95.

The news comes a day after mistaken reports that he had already been sent home from a Pretoria hospital.

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7:44am

Sun September 1, 2013
The Two-Way

British Journalist And TV Personality Sir David Frost Dies At 74

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 7:20 pm

Sir David Frost arrives at London's Downing Street in April 2009.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Veteran British journalist and broadcaster Sir David Frost has died from a suspected heart attack while aboard a luxury cruise ship. He was 74.

The Guardian and The Daily Mail both report that Frost was giving a speech aboard the Queen Elizabeth II, en route from Southampton to Lisbon, when he collapsed.

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3:08pm

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Lawmakers Welcome President Asking For Their OK On Syria

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 4:10 pm

(This post last updated at 4:10 p.m. ET)

Lawmakers, many of whom had urged President Obama to seek authority from Congress before going ahead with a military strike against Syria, were largely positive about his decision to do just that.

The president, in a Rose Garden address on Saturday, said that the U.S. should respond militarily to Syria's Aug. 21 chemical attack that killed more than 1,400 people, but that he would first seek authorization from Congress.

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12:57pm

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Jailed Leader Of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Suffers Heart Attack

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 1:32 pm

Mohammed Badie, the leader of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, at the group's headquarters in Cairo in January 2010.
AFP/Getty Images

Mohammed Badie, the top leader of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, has suffered a heart attack while in jail, Reuters reports, quoting the state-run al-Ahram newspaper on Saturday.

However, state-run news agency MENA has denied a report by the private al-Nahar website, citing security sources, that Badie had died.

Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim was quoted by Reuters as saying that Badie is "in good health" after the heart attack.

Many of the Brotherhood's leaders were imprisoned in recent weeks in the toughest crackdown the group has faced.

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12:40pm

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Obama To Seek Congressional Approval For Action Against Syria

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 11:48 am

At the White House Saturday, President Obama said he would seek congressional approval before taking action in Syria.
Charles Dharapak AP
  • President Obama's Full Speech
  • NPR Special Coverage Of Obama's Speech

(Post updated at 10 p.m. ET)

President Obama said Saturday he had decided that the U.S. should take military action against Syria in response to its use of chemical weapons, but that he will seek a congressional authorization for the action that could come "tomorrow, or next week or one month from now."

Speaking from the Rose Garden, the president said he believed that he had the authority to act without Congress, but said, "I know the country will be stronger if we take this course."

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10:30am

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

15 Killed In China Ammonia Leak

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 2:20 pm

Police officers walk out from the main gate of Weng's Cold Storage Industrial Co. Ltd. at the outskirts of Shanghai, China, on Saturday.
Eugene Hoshiko Associated Press

A liquid ammonia leak at an industrial refrigeration unit in Shanghai has killed at least 15 people and left six others in critical condition.

NPR's Frank Langfitt says the leak occurred before noon on Saturday at a cold storage facility in the city's northern Baoshan District, which handles seafood.

Besides the six in critical condition, 20 others were injured, according to the Shanghai government.

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9:29am

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Teen Gets Three Years In Gang Rape, Murder Of Indian Woman

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 2:43 pm

A protester in India chants slogans as she braces herself against the spray fired from police water canons during a protest in December sparked by the gang rape of a 23-year-old paramedical student.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

An Indian teen has been sentenced to three years in juvenile detention for the gang-rape of a 23-year-old woman who later died in the hospital, the first verdict in a case that has sparked international outrage over the brutal crime.

Police say the convicted 18-year-old was one of five men who lured the 23-year-old victim and her male friend onto a bus in the capital, New Delhi, where she was repeatedly raped and beaten in December.

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8:49am

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Mandela Remains In 'Critical But Stable Condition'

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 2:26 pm

In an image taken from video, South African President Jacob Zuma, left, sits with the ailing anti-apartheid icon Nelson Madela in April.
Associated Press

Nelson Mandela is still in the hospital, despite reports to the contrary.

CNN and the BBC, quoting sources close to Mandela, reported Saturday that the ailing 95-year-old anti-apartheid leader and former South African president had returned to his Johannesburg home after a long hospitalization.

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7:59am

Sat August 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Putin Calls Claims Of Syrian Chemical Attack 'Nonsense'

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 1:30 pm

An image grab taken from a video posted by Syrian activists earlier this week allegedly showing a U.N. inspector listening to the testimony of a man in the Damascus suburb of Moadamiyet al-Sham.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin called U.S. claims that the Syrian regime has used chemical weapons "utter nonsense" and urged the White House not to launch a retaliatory strike.

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