Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith is a NPR White House Correspondent. She is especially focused on matters related to the economy and the Federal budget.

Prior to moving into her current role in January 2014, she was a Congressional Correspondent covering Congress with an emphasis on the budget, taxes and the ongoing fiscal fights. During the Republican presidential primaries she covered Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich in South Carolina, and traveled with Mitt Romney leading into the primaries in Colorado and Ohio, among other states. She began covering congress in August 2011.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived and reported the 2011 NPR series The Road Back To Work, a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member Station KQED's California Report, covering topics including agriculture and the environment. In 2004, Keith began working at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, where she reported on politics and the 2004 presidential campaign.

Keith went back to California to open the state capital bureau for NPR Member Station KPCC/Southern California Public Radio. In 2006, Keith returned to KQED, serving as the Sacramento-region reporter for two years.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited, and distributed for nine years.

Over the course of her career Keith has been the recipient of numerous accolades, including an award for best news writing from the APTRA California/Nevada and a first place trophy from the Society of Environmental Journalists for "Outstanding Story Radio." Keith was a 2010-2011 National Press Foundation Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in Philosophy from University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Tamara is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Hillary Clinton hasn't won the nomination, yet. And Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders hasn't technically lost. But in a statement released after the results were in, Sanders' rhetoric took a notable turn. "[W]e are in this race until the last vote is cast," he said, with no mention of winning the nomination. Instead, "[T]his campaign is going to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia with as many delegates as possible to fight for a progressive party platform." Clinton's primary...

If you only considered crowd size at rallies for Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, you might wonder how Clinton has won so many big states. Sanders draws massive, enthusiastic crowds, while Clinton's rallies often seem tiny and subdued by comparison. Monday night, the eve of five East Coast primaries taking place today, Sanders spoke to an overflow crowd — 3,200 people in total — at Drexel University in Philadelphia. His audience was more than double the crowd that showed up to hear Hillary...

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is waging a campaign at a turning point. The New York primary earlier this week was essentially a must win. And he lost. He's still campaigning as hard as ever, hopping from state to state talking about a rigged economy and a political system ruled by millionaires and billionaires. But the candidate who started out as an underdog and rose to heights few expected has a math problem. Sanders needs to win all the remaining contests by a 20-point margin to catch up to...

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAvDmHU5h50 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udhgQ0oxgNM http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRrVI5gHVyo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZQZamKI9vw It's been more than a month since Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton met on a debate stage, and let's just say they have a few things to work out. In that time, (to quote the MTV reality classic The Real World ), the Democratic race stopped being polite and started getting real. From a distance, the candidates have argued...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6eLToYV1Yk Politicians, take note: Don't eat on camera, don't wear funny looking hats, don't sing, don't rap ... and, generally speaking, don't try to be funny. You will regret it. You will especially regret it if your very lame joke could be interpreted as racially insensitive. Enter New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, who earned themselves the front page of today's New York Daily News and the contempt of many social...

To Bernie Sanders supporters, the idea that Democratic superdelegates — elected officials and other party elites who can vote however they wish at the convention — could tip the nomination to Hillary Clinton seems terribly undemocratic. And so, they're trying to convince superdelegates, officially known as unpledged party leaders and elected officials, to change their allegiance. There are several online petitions. One calls for the elimination of superdelegates altogether. Another asks...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When Bernie Sanders took the stage Sunday night in Madison, Wis., the crowd of about 5,000 went wild. One of the biggest applause lines came when Sanders talked about his campaign taking on the establishment. "These guys may have unlimited sums of money," the Vermont senator said. "They may control the media, they may control the economy, they may control the political system. But when millions of people stand up together united and demand change, we will not be stopped." Sanders' supporters...

Bernie Sanders and his supporters don't consider moving Hillary Clinton to the left a goal or even really a victory of any kind. They want to change America, not the stated positions of another candidate. And while he may not be beating her in the delegate race at the moment, there's an argument that Sanders has already won by getting the issues he cares about into the political blood stream. If Sanders hadn't been in the race, for example, would Clinton have taken a firm position on the...

There's an audio clip circulating on the Internet of Hillary Clinton talking about being proud of her time as a "Goldwater Girl" in 1964. It turns out to be an incomplete and selective excerpt of a lengthy — and still compelling (all these years later) — interview Clinton did in 1996 with Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon. The whole interview is worth a listen or a read. The full transcript is below. But let's just say, the Goldwater section might not even be the most interesting part...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: It's another big day in the presidential race. More than a thousand delegates are at stake in the biggest day of voting since Super Tuesday. Five big states are voting, and polls have just closed in North Carolina and Ohio. With us to talk about the results is NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving. Hello, again, Ron. RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Ari. SHAPIRO: What can you tell us about...

When Bernie Sanders won the primary in Michigan last week, it shook up the narrative of the Democratic race. Sanders did so with the help of white men. If he's able to pull off a victory in Ohio, the same demographic will likely be key. Take Jim, who describes himself, only half jokingly, as an angry white man. "We're pissed off," Jim said. (Jim's asked that his last name be withheld because his union, AFSCME, has endorsed Hillary Clinton, and he supports Sanders. He can't be quoted publicly...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's sum up the Democratic campaign for president in a sentence. We'll get nominations for that sentence from Mo Elleithee of Georgetown University, who is a one-time spokesman for Hillary Clinton. DAVID GREENE, HOST: And also from Tulsi Gabbard, a member of Congress from Hawaii who has endorsed Bernie Sanders. Congresswoman Gabbard, you're on the line. Good morning to you. TULSI GABBARD: Aloha, good...

If you want to understand Clinton's Super Tuesday strategy all you need to do is look at her travel schedule: Georgia, Arkansas, Tennessee and Monday in Massachusetts and Virginia. In these states she's delivering a relatively new, more positive message. There's less drawing contrasts with her primary opponent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and more talk of "breaking down barriers" and "love and kindness." "I want us to break down the barriers that stand in the way of people being successful,...

Nevada Caucus Update

Feb 20, 2016

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We have some news from the presidential race. Hillary Clinton has won the Nevada Democratic caucuses, the Associated Press projects. We wanted to go to Las Vegas now where NPR's Tamara Keith is standing by at a Clinton rally at Caesar's Palace. Welcome back, Tamara. Have we heard yet from Hillary Clinton? TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Hi there. No, Hillary Clinton has not spoken yet, but she should be coming...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: The 2016 presidential campaign has arrived at its next big juncture. This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. On the Republican side, voters in South Carolina have been going to the polls all day in that state's GOP primary. In Nevada, Democrats have spent the afternoon at caucus sites across the state. Early results are coming in and show a very close race between Hillary...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW0dCf4CJbs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzfdscTe_cw While much attention has been focused on Republicans competing in this weekend's South Carolina primary, Democrats will face off in Nevada on Saturday during the "First in the West" caucuses. The race between former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is tighter than anyone anticipated even a month ago. If you're watching from a distance or even if you live in the Silver State,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The Democratic presidential candidates have said for months that the Supreme Court is an important issue in this race. They had no idea how true that would turn out to be. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us to discuss the impact of Justice Antonin Scalia's death on the Democratic side of the race. Welcome back. TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Thank you, Ari. SHAPIRO: Remind us first what Hillary...

(Note: Tonight's debate, moderated by PBS NewsHour anchors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, will be simulcast on CNN and NPR and streamed live on NPR.org . NPR's Tamara Keith will be part of the debate broadcast, providing analysis during and after the event. ) Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton meet Thursday night on a debate stage in Milwaukee. It's their first face-to-face matchup since Tuesday's New Hampshire primary where Sanders beat Clinton by more than 20 points. Sanders raised more than...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Today brings a new reality for Hillary Clinton. If she's going to win the Democratic nomination, it is going to take a long, hard fight. Yesterday, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders defeated her handily in the New Hampshire primary, winning by more than 20 points. NPR's Tamara Keith could tell the Clinton campaign was ready for this. TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: The setup at Clinton's election night party said everything...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: New Hampshire has been known as Clinton Country since 1992. That's when Bill Clinton finished second in the state's Democratic primary and became known as the comeback kid. It 2008, Hillary Clinton pulled off her own come-from-behind win in New Hampshire, but the story could change tonight with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders posing a challenge to Hillary Clinton that she may not be able to overcome....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pmw5CAc3rk Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has said he is a different kind of candidate running a different kind of campaign. He doesn't have a SuperPAC and he doesn't want one. One of the things his supporters say they like about him is Sanders isn't a typical politician. Sanders is like the rare punk rocker who never sold out, never signed with a big label and doesn't see why you'd want to buy designer jeans when thrift store Levis fit just fine and are less...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript SCOTT SIMON, HOST: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Iowans will become the first people to vote in the 2016 presidential race. The Iowa caucuses are Monday night, and the candidates are racing from barbecues to coffee shops to all kinds of events in churches. The race on each side is too close to call, as both Republicans and Democrats work to try and turn out their supporters. We have two reports...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: New Hampshire has a special place in presidential politics, and it's not just that that state hosts the first primary. Candidates often spend time addressing issues that state residents care deeply about. And the result of that - New Hampshire residents can put an issue important to them at the forefront of the national conversation. This year, that issue is addiction. There's an overdose epidemic in...

When Jackie Zanfagna died last year at 25 years old, her parents did something bold. In the first sentence of her obituary they acknowledge what killed her: an accidental overdose of heroin. Now her mom Anne Marie Zanfagna is pouring her grief out onto canvas and in the process helping other parents who have experienced the same loss. Zanfagna is an artist. But, she says, for six months after her daughter died she was too devastated to pick up a paint brush. "I didn't want to shower,"...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We will start the program with politics because tonight marks the last debate of the year for the Democratic presidential contenders Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley. They will all be in New Hampshire for a debate that's supposed to be focused on national security and foreign policy but, of course, one thing people will be watching is the interaction between Sanders and Clinton since...

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