Wade Goodwyn

Wade Goodwyn is a NPR National Desk Correspondent covering Texas and the surrounding states.

Reporting for NPR since 1991, Goodwyn covers a wide range of issues from politics and music to breaking news and crime and punishment. His reports have ranged from weather calamities, religion, and corruption, to immigration, obituaries, business, and high profile court cases. Texas has it all, and Goodwyn has covered it.

Over the last 15 years, Goodwyn has reported on many of the nation's top stories. He's covered the implosion of Enron, the trials of Jeff Skilling and Kenneth Lay, and the prosecution of polygamist Warren Jeffs. Goodwyn's reporting has included the siege of the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas, the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, and the trials of Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols in Denver. He covered the Olympic Games in Atlanta and the school shootings in Paducah Ky., Jonesboro, Ark., and Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.

Among his most recent work has been the wrongful prosecution and conviction of black and Hispanic citizens in Texas and Louisiana. With American and Southwest Airlines headquartered in his backyard, coverage of the airline industry is also a constant for Goodwyn.

As Texas has moved to the vanguard in national Republican politics, Goodwyn has been at the front line as what happens politically in Texas, which is often a bellwether of the coming national political debate. He has covered the state's politicians dominating the national stage, including George W. Bush, Tom Delay and rising GOP star Texas Governor Rick Perry

Before coming to NPR, Goodwyn was a political consultant in New York City.

Goodwyn graduated from the University of Texas with a degree in history.

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7:46am

Sat October 18, 2014
Around the Nation

Dallas Hospital Deals With Aftermath Of Ebola Missteps

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 3:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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12:22pm

Wed October 8, 2014
U.S.

Man Diagnosed With Ebola In Texas Dies In Hospital

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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5:10am

Wed October 1, 2014
Global Health

Will The Ebola Case In Dallas Lead To A U.S. Outbreak?

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 8:01 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

8:15am

Sat September 13, 2014
Commentary

After Exoneration, Small Moments Take On New Meaning

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 12:47 pm

James Lee Woodard was exonerated by DNA evidence after spending 27 years in prison.
Wade Goodwyn NPR

This month brought two more exonerations based on new DNA evidence. Henry Lee McCollum was 19 years old and his half-brother, Leon Brown, was 15 when they were arrested. The two black, intellectually disabled half brothers were convicted of the rape and murder of an 11-year-old Sabrina Buie and spent 30 years on death row.

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5:48pm

Thu September 11, 2014
Shots - Health News

A Doctor Who Performed Abortions In South Texas Makes His Case

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 5:33 pm

Though Reproductive Services of Harlingen has been shuttered for months, the surgery rooms seem frozen in time.
Maisie Crow

In a Brownsville family clinic, a powerfully built, bald doctor treats a never-ending line of sick and injured patients. He has been practicing for nearly four decades, but family medicine is not his calling.

"For 35 years I had a clinic where I saw women and took care of their reproductive needs, but mostly terminating pregnancies," Dr. Lester Minto says.

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12:33pm

Sat August 30, 2014
Politics

Rick Perry's Legal Trouble: The Line Between Influence And Coercion

Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks to the media and supporters after he was booked on August 19 in Austin. Perry is charged with abuse of office and coercing a public official.
Eric Gay AP

The day he was booked, Texas Gov. Rick Perry gave a big smile for his mug shot — which was then printed up on t-shirts to demonstrate just what a farce he thought the indictment was. In a press conference, the scorn dripped from Perry's voice as he took up the sword — defender, not of himself, but of the state's constitution.

"We don't settle political differences with indictments in this country," he said. "It is outrageous that some would use partisan political theatrics to rip away at the very fabric of our state's constitution."

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4:45am

Wed July 23, 2014
Middle East

Airlines Cancel Service To Israel Amid Heightened Aviation Safety Concerns

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 7:51 am

A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.

6:59pm

Mon July 14, 2014
It's All Politics

Showdown At The UT Corral

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 10:54 pm

University of Texas, Austin President Bill Powers (center) speaks with the media following a December 2013 regents meeting in Austin.
Eric Gay AP

Like any ugly, long-running confrontation between a husband and wife or next-door neighbors — or between anybody, really — it's hard to know exactly when the dispute between University of Texas President Bill Powers and Texas GOP Gov. Rick Perry truly began.

But in the end, when the dust settled, one thing was clear: When powerful university presidents and powerful governors tangle, the politician usually ends up on top.

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12:53pm

Thu July 3, 2014
It's All Politics

Will Texas GOP Candidate's Actions On Chemicals Prove Toxic?

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 2:24 pm

Texas Republican Greg Abbott, who's been cruising toward easy victory in the governor's race against Democrat Wendy Davis, is making some campaign news this week — and not the good kind.

His actions and comments have brought his relationship to the state's chemical industry under scrutiny.

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5:35pm

Fri June 27, 2014
It's All Politics

What's The Matter With Wendy Davis?

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:39 pm

Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis pauses as she speaks to supporters at her campaign headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas, in March.
LM Otero AP

Texas Democrats are holding their convention this weekend in Dallas. Supporters are hoping it will give Wendy Davis a chance to reboot her campaign for governor and come out with some much-needed momentum.

A question posed in the San Antonio Express-News is typical of the kind of media she's been getting: "What's Wrong With Wendy?" With the Democratic candidate for governor running far behind her Republican challenger, Greg Abbott, it's not necessarily an unfair question.

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8:04am

Sat June 14, 2014
National Security

After Isolation, Bergdahl Likely Faces A Long Recovery

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 12:12 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. And I'm Scott Simon. Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl has returned to the United States. He's at the Brooke Army Medical Hospital in San Antonio, Texas as new details of his imprisonment by the Taliban continue to emerge. Fox News is reporting that Sergeant Bergdahl spent the last two years in solitary confinement. From San Antonio, NPR's Wade Goodwin has more on this story.

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4:55pm

Fri June 13, 2014
National Security

As Bergdahl Touches Down In Texas, Reintegration Begins

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 6:23 pm

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in the U.S. The former Taliban prisoner is now undergoing treatment at an Army hospital in San Antonio, Texas.

4:31pm

Fri June 6, 2014
It's All Politics

Will Rick Perry Take Another Swing At The Presidency?

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:35 pm

Gov. Rick Perry gives a speech during the Texas GOP Convention in Fort Worth on Thursday. In his address, the longest-serving governor in the state's history focused more on the future and national issues than his political legacy at home.
Rex C. Curry AP

At the Republican State Convention in Fort Worth on Thursday, Texas GOP Gov. Rick Perry and his wife gave strong signals that while the state's longest-serving Texas governor is finally stepping down, he might well be back for an encore — as a presidential contender.

While introducing her husband at what was billed as a farewell address after 14 years of running the state, Anita Perry hinted at their political future by saying there's still "tread left in our tires."

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11:46am

Thu June 5, 2014
It's All Politics

'Open Carry' Gun Laws Spark Texas Backlash

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 3:15 pm

A Texas flag sticks out of the barrel of a rifle belonging to Robert Perez, as he and others with the group Open Carry Tarrant County gathered for a May 29 demonstration in Haltom City, Texas.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Last week, not long after a lone gunman's rampage in California, Texas witnessed an unnerving series of demonstrations.

Groups of young men, armed with tactical long rifles slung across their backs, began showing up at restaurants like Chili's and Chipotle, Sonic and Jack in the Box, to mention a few, as part of their response to another anguished gun control conversation.

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4:23pm

Thu May 29, 2014
It's All Politics

Texas Takes A Hard Right Turn

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 5:39 pm

Texas Republican Dan Patrick, who defeated Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, faces the media at a polling place Tuesday in Houston.
Pat Sullivan AP

The headline in the Dallas Morning News summed it up nicely: "Tea For Texas."

While the political news around the country has generally been how the Republican establishment has triumphantly held off Tea Party challengers, in Texas Tuesday it was the opposite.

David Dewhurst is a prime example of what happened. For more than a decade, all Lt. Gov. Dewhurst has done is faithfully serve the legislative agenda of one of the most conservative Republican governors in the country, Rick Perry.

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5:24pm

Thu May 8, 2014
Around the Nation

The Messy Legal Road That Led To Oklahoma's Botched Execution

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 11:08 pm

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, here with Michael C. Thompson, state secretary of safety and security, charged that the state Supreme Court had exceeded its jurisdiction when it called for a stay of execution in the Clayton Lockett case in March.
Alonzo Adams AP

Although most of the country just became aware of issues with Oklahoma's capital punishment protocols last week after Clayton Lockett's bungled execution, his lawyers had been worried for months. That's because in January, two condemned men in different states but injected with the same new drug cocktail endured executions that went badly. Lockett's lawyer, Susanna Gattoni, was unable to keep him from suffering a similar fate last week.

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5:37pm

Mon April 14, 2014
Around the Nation

A 'Roller Coaster' Year For Texas Town Rocked By Blast

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Firefighters search for survivors at a West, Texas, apartment building in April 2013. The breadth of destruction in West has raised questions about what, if any, new state laws should be passed to help prevent similar accidents in the future.
LM Otero AP

When firetrucks blew through the small town of West, Texas, on the evening of April 17, 2013, sirens screaming, naturally everybody was curious. People got in their cars and went to see the fire at the West fertilizer plant. For 10 minutes, they watched from cars and backyards as the fire grew ever bigger. A few moved as close as they could because they were filming on their smartphones. At no time did it occur to anybody that they might be in danger.

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6:14pm

Mon April 7, 2014
Sports

The Latest In HD TV, From The Comfort Of Your Courtside Seat

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 8:38 pm

Huge HD TV screens have changed the stadium experience. Many fans who paid big bucks for a ticket to the game will still be watching it on TV.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Millions of people will be glued to TV screens Monday watching the NCAA men's college basketball championship — and some of those viewers will actually be in the stands.

Monday's Connecticut vs. Kentucky game will be played at AT&T Stadium, home to the Dallas Cowboys, where an enormous Mitsubishi screen hangs from the roof. It's the length of four coach buses by 72 feet high. And while the screen is ridiculously huge, the picture quality of the LED 1080 high definition is amazing.

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4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
News

Oil Spill Disrupts A Waterway Thick With Barges And Birds

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

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4:16pm

Thu March 6, 2014
News

Texas Abortion Restrictions Shutter Two More Clinics

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 7:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The last two abortion clinics in Texas' Rio Grande Valley along the Mexican border are closing today. New restrictions passed by the Texas Legislature last year require that doctors at abortion clinics obtain admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles. Well, many hospitals have been reluctant to grant those privileges, and as NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports, today's closures have women's health advocates concerned.

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3:38am

Tue February 25, 2014
Architecture

A College Project That Imagines A Floating City For Oil Workers

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 8:58 am

View of central crossing of the central hub island, one of dozens of man-made islands envisioned by Rice University architecture students. The islands would serve as a floating city for oil workers off the coast of Brazil.
Rice School of Architecture

Imagine you're in a college-level architecture class and your assignment is to come up with an idea so revolutionary that it could be considered an important advance in industrial design.

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5:45pm

Tue January 28, 2014
Shots - Health News

The Strange Case Of Marlise Munoz And John Peter Smith Hospital

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 3:37 pm

Erick Munoz, flanked by lawyers, walks to 96th District Court last Friday. A judge ordered a Texas hospital to remove life support from his wife, Marlise.
Tim Sharp AP

It would have been hard to find a happier man than Erick Munoz on that Tuesday morning before Thanksgiving.

With a healthy and delightful son toddling around the house, and his beautiful and successful wife pregnant with their second child, the fire department paramedic had everything in life that's really important. So it must have been with a feeling of disbelief and horror that Munoz knelt across the nearly lifeless body of his wife, Marlise, on the kitchen floor at 2 a.m., his fingers linking across her heart, arms pumping away in vain.

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4:30am

Thu December 26, 2013
Around the Nation

After Okla. Tornado's Devastation, A Search For Safety And Shelter

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 10:29 am

Crews work on a safe room for the new Plaza Towers Elementary school in Moore, Okla., behind crosses erected for the seven students who died in the May tornado.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Some of the most painful stories of 2013 came from a small community in Oklahoma, the town of Moore. It was hit by a monster F5 tornado in May. Two dozen people died. More than a thousand homes were wiped away. The damage was estimated at $2 billion. But when NPR's Wade Goodwyn returned to Moore recently, he found the worst damage might not be visible.

WADE GOODWYN, BYLINE: Stand in the middle of Lakeview Drive in Moore, and you're surrounded by a lot of wide-open Oklahoma. Turns out an F5 tornado can clear quite a stretch of land.

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6:28pm

Sat December 21, 2013
Around the Nation

Camels Trek In The Texas Desert, Just Like Old Times

Originally published on Sat December 21, 2013 10:28 pm

The camel trek guides insist everything Americans think they know about camels is wrong.
Wade Goodwyn NPR

At 10 on a crisp West Texas morning, five camel-trekkers stand under the open sky of the Davis Mountains. A few feet away, guide Doug Baum and Jason Mayfield load up five camels.

Baum, a former zookeeper, runs the Texas Camel Corps. The group guides camel treks around the world. In the Big Bend region, camels were for a brief time widespread, and the guides have brought them back.

'As Good As They Come'

You have to like a man who brings his own camel to a camel trek. On Mayfield's arm is a tall, beautiful blond named Butter.

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3:03am

Tue December 17, 2013
U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work

Even An 85 MPH Highway Can't Fix Austin's Traffic Tangle

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:30 am

Texas Highway 130, a new Austin bypass toll road, is so far east of the city that it sees little traffic. The state recently raised the speed limit there to 85 mph in hopes of boosting its use.
Wikipedia

Four decades ago, Austin, Texas, had a population of 250,000 and a reputation as a laid-back oasis of liberal politics and live music. Today, the Austin metro area is home to 1.8 million people and has some of the nation's worst traffic congestion.

For years, the city has done little to address the growing problem. But most in the Texas capital now agree something has to change if Austin is to save what's left of its quirky character.

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5:15pm

Thu November 21, 2013
The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later

Marking Kennedy Assassination, Dallas Still On 'Eggshells'

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 8:22 pm

Dallas is preparing for Friday's 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination, and hoping to show how much the city has changed.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Friday's 50th anniversary of assassination of President John F. Kennedy is an important moment for Dallas: The city wants to use the occasion to demonstrate how much it has changed.

In the 1960s — after the president's murder — Dallas became known around the world as "The City of Hate." And it was a hotbed of right-wing politics, a magnet for the extremes of the conservative movement at the time.

If the world would like to see evidence that Dallas is no longer the City of Hate, it need not look further than the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.

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5:12pm

Wed October 30, 2013
Politics

Texas' Voter ID Law Creates A Problem For Some Women

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 9:03 pm

Marta Rangel Medel vacuums the stage in preparation for the Texas Democratic Party 2012 election watch party in Austin. The state's controversial voter ID law is unexpectedly hindering women at the polls.
Eric Gay AP

In 2012 a federal court struck down Texas' ID law, ruling it would potentially disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of minority voters.

But that federal decision was invalidated when the Supreme Court last year ruled part of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. So now Texas is test-driving its voter ID law — one of the most restrictive voter ID laws in the nation.

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4:51am

Mon August 26, 2013
Around the Nation

97-Year-Old Birder Has No Intention Of Slowing Down

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If 60 is the new 50 and 50 the new 40, well, what then is 97? Veteran bird guide Karl Haller is busy redefining what it means to be just shy of a century. He's been counting birds and teaching the art of bird watching at the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge in North Texas for over 50 years.

His student this time: NPR's Wade Goodwyn.

WADE GOODWYN, BYLINE: A cool breeze is blowing off Lake Texoma and into the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge.

(LAUGHTER)

KARL HALLER: Well, it could be. Yeah. We'd only...

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5:36am

Wed August 14, 2013
Law

Feds Sue To Block Proposed Airline Merger

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's hear now about a proposed airline merger. In a surprise move, the Justice Department announced yesterday that it will try to stop American Airlines and U.S. Airways from becoming one. This is largely because of two other mergers that made both Delta and United Airlines much bigger. Those deals were approved back in 2008 and 2010. Now, as NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports from Dallas, the government seems determined to change course.

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4:59pm

Thu July 25, 2013
Law

Federal Case Pits Wounded Warrior Against FBI

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:43 pm

Former Army Ranger Justin Slaby is suing the FBI, claiming he was unfairly dismissed from agent training because of his prosthetic hand.
Courtesy of Butler & Harris

Army Ranger Justin Slaby served two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. While he was back in the U.S. preparing to deploy for a fourth tour, his left hand was blown off by a faulty grenade in a training accident. After being fitted with a state-of-the-art prosthesis, Slaby was encouraged by one of his doctors to try for a career in the FBI. What happened next has landed the ex-Ranger and the FBI in court and already tarnished the career of a high-ranking agent.

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