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President Trump is hosting French President Emmanuel Macron for a state visit this week. The two leaders are holding a news conference ahead of Tuesday night's state dinner. Watch their remarks live starting at 11:45 a.m.

Cindy Shebley / Flickr

On this episode of "Take Care" we're exploring addiction and the opioid crisis. It's a topic on the minds of health professionals, community leaders, elected officials and citizens across the country. Some cities and states have been hit particularly hard, others are working proactively to give their residents options for recovery. It's a complicated issue that we're looking at from a few different angles.

From BBC World Service's "The Compass," scientist Liz Bonnin offers a deep dive into the Earth's oceans. From Mauritius to Alaska, the Philippines to Cape Town, she shares stories of people who make a living from the sea and its wildlife, capturing the powerful ties that bind so many of us to the awesome majesty of the oceans.

Join us this Sunday, April 15 at 7 p.m. and again on April 29 at 7 p.m. for this two-part series in celebration of Earth Day.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is appearing on Capitol Hill for a second day of hearings about protecting its users' data. The House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing follows hours of questioning by lawmakers in the Senate.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying on Capitol Hill to answer questions about protecting user data. We will have a live feed online this afternoon (starting at 2:15 p.m.) and tomorrow morning to cover any developments.

King's Last March

Mar 28, 2018

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Half a century later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

"King's Last March" includes interviews with some of the leader's closest colleagues and advisors, who reflect on the last year of his life, and the last protest movement of his career. It's a powerful and moving exploration of the final chapter of King's life that offers audiences reflection on the 50th anniversary of his death.

This season of "Invisibilia," coming in April, examines how the stories we tell ourselves can lock us into one place or another and what happens in the space between.

Join us for a special presentation tying the golden age of radio to the silver screen, this time at the Auburn Public Theater. "Tuned to Yesterday" is at the movies again with "The Hitch-Hiker." The 1953 picture, regarded as the first American film-noir directed by a woman, follows two fishing buddies who pick up a mysterious hitchhiker during a trip to Mexico. Inspired by the crime spree of psychopathic murderer Billy Cook, the film is sure to keep you on the edge of your seat.

Many children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder will go on to become adults with ADHD, and some adults with the disorder are not diagnosed until adulthood.

Professor Stephen Faraone discusses how the symptoms in children differ from those seen in adults. He also addresses diagnosis and treatment options. Faraone is a distinguished professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and a professor of neuroscience and physiology at Upstate and recommends ADHD resources for health care providers and the public.

NPR's "Embedded" team returns with two programs on the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Host Kelly McEvers reports on two key questions explored by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for the next two Sundays on WRVO.

Collusion | Sunday, March 11 at 7 p.m.

Dino Babers knew he wanted to be a coach from the time he was 6 years old, even before he found his sport.

Today as head football coach at Syracuse University, Babers motivates student athletes. He talks about what that's like, as well as the training regimen for SU football players and how non-athletes can make fitness a part of their lives, on this week’s “HealthLink on Air.”

He also shares his favorite sports movies: "The Natural," "Field of Dreams" and "Remember the Titans."

Also this week: a program that helps children overcome a variety of feeding disorders.

Tune in over the next four weeks as "Freakonomics Radio" takes listeners behind the scenes of some of the most powerful companies in the world, interviewing these current and former CEOs:

Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Richard Branson (Virgin), Satya Nadella (Microsoft), Indra Nooyi (PepsiCo), Jack Welch (General Electric), Ellen Pao (Reddit), Carol Bartz (Yahoo!), Ray Dalio (Bridgewater Associates), and David Rubenstein (The Carlyle Group).

The BBC World Service presents remarkable stories of women's history, told by the women who were there. Selected from its Witness program, audiences will hear the story of the first women to vote in Kuwait; meet the woman who took the x-ray that revealed the structure of DNA; and hear how one woman's experience of 'date rape' changed the discourse around sexual violence in America.

Tune in this Sunday, March 4 at 7 p.m. for this broadcast of "Witness."

Witness the antics of The Capitol Steps, Jay Leno, Dennis Miller, George Carlin, Chevy Chase, and John Toomey. Hear Stan Freberg lampoon George Washington, James Whitmore play Harry Truman, Charlie Warren impersonate Jimmy Carter, and Rich Little play Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

The FBI director and several top intelligence leaders are testifying on Capitol Hill about worldwide threats. The Senate Intelligence Committee, which is holding the hearing, is also conducting an inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Watch the proceedings live, here.

Tune in this Sunday for a special program from the BBC World Service.

Hear remarkable stories of African American history, told by the people who were there. Selected from "Witness," audiences will hear the story o America's first major-party black candidate for president; meet one of the founding members of the first classical ballet company to focus on black dancers; and Ruby Bridges talks about being escorted to school by U.S. Marshals.

Tune in this Sunday, February 11 at 7 p.m. for "Witness: Black History Month."

WRVO Public Media seeks a new morning news host to join our award-winning news team. The Morning Edition Host/News Reporter will serve as the local host for WRVO’s most important daypart, will write, prepare and deliver news and continuity during local portions of Morning Edition, and will contribute news reports and features as required.

"Take Care" returns this weekend with our first show of 2018. We'll be exploring the theme of giving from a health and wellness perspective this hour with a handful of very engaging guests.

Liam James Doyle/NPR

Massachusetts Rep. Joe Kennedy III, seen as a rising political star with a famous last name, delivered the Democratic response to President Trump's State of the Union. In announcing their decision, Democratic leaders in Congress called Kennedy a "relentless fighter for working Americans." Kennedy is the grandson of the late Robert Kennedy, the former U.S. attorney general and New York senator who was assassinated in 1968. He is also the great nephew of both the late Massachusetts Sen.

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

President Trump delivered his first State of the Union address to Congress Tuesday night, which was followed by a response from the Democratic Party. Journalists across the NPR newsroom have been annotating those remarks, adding fact-checks and analysis in real time.

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For the past six years, the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York has supported health and wellness programming on WRVO. While the vehicle has changed over the years, from community forums to weekly shows and hour-long specials, they’ve been committed to supporting our effects to bring listeners the latest in health and wellness news that affects your community and your life.

By most accounts, the American economy is booming — manufacturing is at a 13-year high, unemployment is at a 16-year low, and both the stock market and consumer confidence are soaring. But just what is driving this upturn? And can Americans trust that current economic conditions will hold up in the months ahead?

In Intelligence Squared U.S.’s first debate of this season, five esteemed economic thinkers debate the state of the American economy, from tax cuts to trade policy.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Coming up this week, a special broadcast with Diane Rehm.

A year after President Trump's inauguration, Diane talks with a panel of top political analysts about how the country has changed since his election, and what's ahead for the White House, Congress and voters in 2018.

Tune in this Friday, January 19 at 1 p.m. and again Sunday, January 21 at 7 p.m. for this special broadcast. You can find more details about "One Year Under Trump" on WAMU's website.

A few changes are coming to the weekend lineup on WRVO Public Media this year.

A surgical procedure can correct a birth defect called pectus excavatum, in which a person's breastbone is sunken into his or her chest. Dr. Jason Wallen, chief of thoracic surgery at Upstate, explains how a steel bar is inserted between the breastbone, or sternum, and the heart and left in place for two to three years.

The condition is suspected to be genetic, affecting how the cartilage and bone form where the ribs meet the sternum.

Also on this weeks' show: breast-feeding, plus hand pain causes and treatments.

Join us this weekend, and next, for the winners of the 17th annual Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition.

From more than 600 entries, eleven were chosen as winners. The stories are meticulously crafted and lovingly produced -- they intrigue, inform and inspire. The program also features interviews with some of the exceptional producers.

We'll hear the best from Third Coast this weekend and next on WRVO, Sunday, January 7 and 14 at 7 p.m. If you missed the live broadcast, you can listen online.

A Christmas Carol

Dec 20, 2017
Jim, the Photographer / Flickr

Hear the ghosts of Christmas come alive this holiday season with this special radio adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic "A Christmas Carol."

Children and adults alike will enjoy this rendition of this heart-warming Christmas favorite. The myriad of sound effects and musical cues put the listener right there with the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future.

Tune in December 24 at 7 p.m. for "A Christmas Carol" on WRVO.

With 2017 coming to a close, we find ourselves reflecting on all that has occurred this year. The radio business doesn't have a slow season, so it's not often we have a moment to step back from the day-to-day.

Timothy K Hamilton / Flickr

Enjoy this hour of mixes and mashes and season samples and songs.

First, Christmas at Bagram Air Base hospital in Afghanistan, a tour of the Holy Land with Hanukkah military history, a visit to a toy store and some musical Chrismashups.

Tune in this Sunday, December 17 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. If you missed the on-air broadcast, you can still listen online.

We've made it through another year. We hope it was a good one for you and your family.

Our news department was busy, as was NPR's. There was plenty of news to cover: a new administration in Washington, an outgoing administration in Syracuse, hurricanes, healthcare, tax reform and more. You heard it all on WRVO, covered with accuracy, dependability and integrity.

If you're a member, you know that coverage was possible because of your support. Thank you if you take that extra step to support the service you rely on.

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