WRVO Public Media

Leah Landry / WRVO

Reporter Payne Horning has been traveling across central and northern New York covering stories in your backyards for two years now. Although he's based in our Oswego office, he's regularly spotted in the Mohawk Valley and North Country tracking down stories. He says between his appreciation for NPR and his passion for radio, WRVO was a natural fit!  

Today is the day to consider a gift to WRVO.

The odd thing about public radio is that you don't (technically) have to pay for it. You have to pay for a lot of things: your internet and cable bill, your hobbies, or a night out on the town -- but you don't get a monthly bill from WRVO.

Not unless you ask for one!

Matt Coulter / Syracuse University

On November 7, voters in Syracuse will choose their next mayor. There are four candidates on the ballot: Democrat Juanita Perez Williams, Republican Laura Lavine, Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins, and Ben Walsh, an independent candidate who will be on the Upstate Jobs, Reform and Independence Party lines. All four candidates sat down with Grant Reeher for their first debate on WRVO. 

WRVO News

On November 7, voters in the city of Syracuse will go to the polls to choose their next mayor. This year, four candidates are running for the job: Democrat Juanita Perez Williams, Republican Laura Lavine, independent candidate Ben Walsh, and the Green Party's Howie Hawkins. All four candidates sat down for their first debate this week, which you can hear in full Monday, October 2 at 7 p.m. on WRVO Public Media.

WRVO News

WRVO Public Media will broadcast the first debate between the candidates for mayor of Syracuse. The debate, which was recorded Thursday, September 28, will air Monday, October 2 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. Grant Reeher, host of "The Campbell Conversations" and director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute at the Maxwell School of Citizenship at Syracuse University, will moderate the debate.

The debate includes Republican nominee Laura Lavine, Democratic nominee Juanita Perez Williams, independent candidate Ben Walsh and Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins.

This month, we take a up-close look at the Supreme Court.  How does an elite group of nine people shape everything from marriage and money, to safety and sex for an entire nation? A spinoff series from "Radiolab," "More Perfect" dives into the rarefied world of the Supreme Court to explain how cases deliberated inside hallowed halls affect lives far away from the bench.

Emily Hanford

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that's supposed to ensure schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place.

This APM Reports documentary investigates why, and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Ellender Memorial Library, Nicholls State University

A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses.

Andy Vasoyan / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO continues our series of education documentaries from American Public Media. This week: the issues undocumented students face when they try to continue their education.

U.S. public schools must treat undocumented students like citizens. But once these students graduate, everything changes. Without papers, they don't qualify for federal college grants, they can't legally work to pay for tuition, and they may have to pay out-of-state tuition.

Emily Hanford / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO begins a series of four education documentaries from American Public Media. This week, in the first episode: understanding the issue of getting good teachers and, more importantly, keeping them.

There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers, but U.S. schools are struggling to attract and keep them. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, those most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump addressed the nation Monday night on U.S. engagement and "the path forward" in Afghanistan and South Asia. Senior U.S. officials told NPR's Tom Bowman ahead of the speech that the president is expected to deploy about 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan, though Trump did not give specifics during the speech. The decision follows months of deliberation within the Trump administration, involving top military commanders, political advisers and even enlisted veterans of the nearly 16-year war.

Jason Smith / WRVO News

It happened. The solar eclipse made its way across central and northern New York today. The moon covered around 60 percent of the sun this afternoon. And while the skies didn't go dark and nocturnal animals didn't come out to see what all the fuss was about, many were enjoying the partial eclipse.

Jason Smith, our morning host, was able to capture the eclipse through his camera, with a filter.

Reporter Tom Magnarelli stopped by the Rosamond Gifford Zoo for their solar eclipse viewing party.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher / NASA

The excitement has been building for weeks and weeks. Today, the solar eclipse is finally here. It will darken skies along a path from Oregon to South Carolina. It's the first eclipse that will be seen from coast to coast in 99 years. Millions will don special glasses or watch through pinhole projectors. Eclipse enthusiasts say totality never disappoints.

In central New York, you can expect the moon to partially block out the sun this afternoon, with peak happening just past 2:30 p.m.

WRVO Public Media seeks a Director of News and Public Affairs to lead our award-winning News Department. While this position is located on the campus of SUNY Oswego, this is not a New York State position.

Jim Mattis / Flickr

The Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing this morning about foreign agents and attempts to influence the U.S. election. The panel is among the bodies investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Senators had requested Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort, President Trump's former campaign chairman, to appear as witnesses. Instead, they are in closed-door discussions for now.

Masters of Scale

Jul 25, 2017

Hosted by LinkedIn co-founder and investor Reid Hoffman, "Masters of Scale" is an original series in which Hoffman tests his theories about how companies grow from zero to a gazillion. In conversation with famous founders, Hoffman connects the dots between fascinating disparate stories with the aim of illuminating big concepts and simple hacks that can change everything.

Hear these episodes through the end of August on WRVO.

IQ2US

Imagine getting a check from the government every month. $600 guaranteed. It’s happening in Finland, where a pilot program is being launched to test what’s known as a “universal basic income.” This week, we debate that reality.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

Christopher Wray, President Trump’s nominee for FBI Director, faces the Senate Judiciary Committee today for his confirmation hearing. Wray would replace James Comey, whom Trump fired in May.

Wray served in the Justice Department under President George W. Bush and currently works on white-collar crime at an international law firm. Given Comey's dismissal and ongoing investigations into Russian interference in the U.S. election and potential ties to the Trump campaign, senators are expected to press Wray on his independence and integrity.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," stories of those who share and those who creep in the shadows. You'll hear:

The Mollusc and the Peacock by Natalie Kestecher (Short Cuts, BBC Radio 4, 2014)

This is the story of a Facebook lurker, someone who sees herself as curious but benign. Like her grandmother, who was a fan of American soap operas, she has a taste for stories about the lives of others just as long as they’re glamorous and extravagant and don’t bear too much resemblance to reality.

Voyager Found by Jonathan Mitchell (The Truth, 2014)

This week, Republicans in Congress will try to rally votes behind a bill that proposes major changes to the way Americans get health care and how much they pay. In New York, many could be affected. Experts estimate cuts in the original Senate bill would leave New York on the hook for between $4 billion and $8 billion.

Use this Q&A to explore how the bill would affect you:

Fredrik Rubensson / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," from the Third Coast Audio Festival, two stories of love through loss. We'll also enjoy an interview with the producers who've written their way through these troubled moments. Tune in for:

The Updates by Sophie Townsend with Sound Engineer Louis Mitchell. (360documentaries, ABC RN 2014)

Last week, WRVO said goodbye to General Manager Michael S. Ameigh as he is now -- officially -- retired. We say officially because there had always been talk of retirement, as their often is after many years of dedicated service. We just never though it would actually happen!

Jon Fife / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," heard Sunday nights on WRVO, uninvited guests like old lovers, irrational fears and the annoying habits that keep us up at night. You'll hear:

Like Steps Of Passing Ghosts by Kaitlin Prest (a Falling Tree Production for The Essay, BBC Radio 3, 2015)

Kaitlin Prest explores how we can remain haunted by past loves 'Like Steps of Passing Ghosts.'

Holdout by Katie Mingle and Roman Mars (99% Invisible, 2014)

A woman watches while a shopping mall goes up all around her.

Andrew Houser / Flickr

This week, on "Re:sound," we'll turn down the thermostat and usher in stories that gives us the chills. This Sunday you'll hear:

I Fell Through the Ice by Dennis Funk and Gwen Macsai (Re:sound debut, 2016)

Phil Smith grew up skating on frozen lakes. But one New Year's Eve, reliving his childhood memories put him in a life and death situation.

Overland by Nate DiMeo (The Memory Palace , 2016)

What realities should we entertain for ourselves?

How does culture help shape the reality each of us lives in?

Join us this Sunday for a special hour of Re:sound, in which the team shares their favorite entires to the 2016 ShortDocs Challenge.

This show features the entries, as well as interviews with producers, a visit to Manual Cinema -- who are adapting the winning ShortDoc into a live shadow puppetry performance -- and more.

Tune in this Sunday, June 18 at 7 p.m. for this episode of Re:sound. If you missed it on-air, you can hear it online.

Ryan J. Reilly / Flickr

Today, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to testify before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He's expected to field questions about Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election, the ongoing investigation of Russian contacts with Trump campaign and administrative officials, and the dismissal of former FBI Director James Comey.

NPR News and WRVO will be providing live coverage of the hearing starting at 2:30 p.m. on-air. Tune in across central and northern New York or online.

Herm Card / Syracuse Press Club

WRVO Public Media has once again been recognized for excellence in journalism and public affairs content. This spring, the WRVO News team received awards from both the Syracuse Press Club (SPC) and New York State Associated Press Association (NYSAPA).

For Best News Feature, Ellen Abbott's piece "Farmers try to find ways to deal with more severe weather" received top honors.

Marina Muun for NPR

What happens when people can't agree on reality? Many in our increasingly polarized society confront this question every day.

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