WRVO Public Media

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Coming up this week, a special broadcast with Diane Rehm.

A year after President Trump's inauguration, Diane talks with a panel of top political analysts about how the country has changed since his election, and what's ahead for the White House, Congress and voters in 2018.

Tune in this Friday, January 19 at 1 p.m. and again Sunday, January 21 at 7 p.m. for this special broadcast. You can find more details about "One Year Under Trump" on WAMU's website.

A few changes are coming to the weekend lineup on WRVO Public Media this year.

A surgical procedure can correct a birth defect called pectus excavatum, in which a person's breastbone is sunken into his or her chest. Dr. Jason Wallen, chief of thoracic surgery at Upstate, explains how a steel bar is inserted between the breastbone, or sternum, and the heart and left in place for two to three years.

The condition is suspected to be genetic, affecting how the cartilage and bone form where the ribs meet the sternum.

Also on this weeks' show: breast-feeding, plus hand pain causes and treatments.

Join us this weekend, and next, for the winners of the 17th annual Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition.

From more than 600 entries, eleven were chosen as winners. The stories are meticulously crafted and lovingly produced -- they intrigue, inform and inspire. The program also features interviews with some of the exceptional producers.

We'll hear the best from Third Coast this weekend and next on WRVO, Sunday, January 7 and 14 at 7 p.m. If you missed the live broadcast, you can listen online.

A Christmas Carol

Dec 20, 2017
Jim, the Photographer / Flickr

Hear the ghosts of Christmas come alive this holiday season with this special radio adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic "A Christmas Carol."

Children and adults alike will enjoy this rendition of this heart-warming Christmas favorite. The myriad of sound effects and musical cues put the listener right there with the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future.

Tune in December 24 at 7 p.m. for "A Christmas Carol" on WRVO.

With 2017 coming to a close, we find ourselves reflecting on all that has occurred this year. The radio business doesn't have a slow season, so it's not often we have a moment to step back from the day-to-day.

Timothy K Hamilton / Flickr

Enjoy this hour of mixes and mashes and season samples and songs.

First, Christmas at Bagram Air Base hospital in Afghanistan, a tour of the Holy Land with Hanukkah military history, a visit to a toy store and some musical Chrismashups.

Tune in this Sunday, December 17 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. If you missed the on-air broadcast, you can still listen online.

We've made it through another year. We hope it was a good one for you and your family.

Our news department was busy, as was NPR's. There was plenty of news to cover: a new administration in Washington, an outgoing administration in Syracuse, hurricanes, healthcare, tax reform and more. You heard it all on WRVO, covered with accuracy, dependability and integrity.

If you're a member, you know that coverage was possible because of your support. Thank you if you take that extra step to support the service you rely on.

This afternoon, tune in for live coverage from NPR News on WRVO. President Trump is expected to make remarks at 1 p.m. He plans to recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, reversing decades of U.S. foreign policy.

You'll hear continued coverage during "Here and Now" this afternoon and more analysis on "All Things Considered" later today. As always, updates are available from NPR.

Shelby U / Flickr

Join us for an hour of rarely-heard holiday music highlighting artists, arrangements, lyrics and compositions from today and yesterday.

Hear John Denver with "Christmas Like a Lullaby," Mannheim Steamroller with "Carol of the Birds," and much more, from the classical to the modern. A full list of songs featured on "An Unfamiliar Christmas" is available online.

Tune in this Sunday, December 10 at 7 p.m. on WRVO for "An Unfamiliar Christmas."

Join us for an NPR News special this weekend exploring the latest sexual harassment allegations and admissions.

It's been a little more than a year since President Trump, then candidate-Trump, faces furious criticism over the now infamous Access Hollywood video featuring his comments about groping women. He subsequently faced a barrage of sexual harassment claims. While the moment sparked a national conversation about sexual harassment, it did not quash his Presidential aspirations.

This history special traces the development of racial, and racist, ideas. We’ll start in the ancient world, when "there was no notion of race," as historian Nell Irvin Painter puts it, and continue to the founding of the United States as, fundamentally, a nation of and for white people.

LBJ's War

Nov 8, 2017
PRI

Through secretly taped phone calls and archival interviews, most unheard until now, this program tells the story of LBJ's fall from grace in the voices of those who were there when this history was made and who had a hand in its making.

This year, SUNY Oswego's Lewis B. O'Donnell Media Summit took on "fake news." The summit is a cooperative effort of the college's communication and broadcasting community -- both faculty and students. Part of a broader set of activities to give SUNY Oswego students access to alumni and other professionals in media, the summit features four panelists and one moderator.

The panel, of White House and other broadcast news industry veterans, spoke on the politically and emotionally charged subject of "fake news." This year's panelists included media professionals on the national scene -- all with past local connections -- as well as a local talk radio host and a SUNY Oswego alumna.

Leah Landry / WRVO

Reporter Payne Horning has been traveling across central and northern New York covering stories in your backyards for two years now. Although he's based in our Oswego office, he's regularly spotted in the Mohawk Valley and North Country tracking down stories. He says between his appreciation for NPR and his passion for radio, WRVO was a natural fit!  

Today is the day to consider a gift to WRVO.

The odd thing about public radio is that you don't (technically) have to pay for it. You have to pay for a lot of things: your internet and cable bill, your hobbies, or a night out on the town -- but you don't get a monthly bill from WRVO.

Not unless you ask for one!

Matt Coulter / Syracuse University

On November 7, voters in Syracuse will choose their next mayor. There are four candidates on the ballot: Democrat Juanita Perez Williams, Republican Laura Lavine, Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins, and Ben Walsh, an independent candidate who will be on the Upstate Jobs, Reform and Independence Party lines. All four candidates sat down with Grant Reeher for their first debate on WRVO. 

WRVO News

On November 7, voters in the city of Syracuse will go to the polls to choose their next mayor. This year, four candidates are running for the job: Democrat Juanita Perez Williams, Republican Laura Lavine, independent candidate Ben Walsh, and the Green Party's Howie Hawkins. All four candidates sat down for their first debate this week, which you can hear in full Monday, October 2 at 7 p.m. on WRVO Public Media.

WRVO News

WRVO Public Media will broadcast the first debate between the candidates for mayor of Syracuse. The debate, which was recorded Thursday, September 28, will air Monday, October 2 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. Grant Reeher, host of "The Campbell Conversations" and director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute at the Maxwell School of Citizenship at Syracuse University, will moderate the debate.

The debate includes Republican nominee Laura Lavine, Democratic nominee Juanita Perez Williams, independent candidate Ben Walsh and Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins.

This month, we take a up-close look at the Supreme Court.  How does an elite group of nine people shape everything from marriage and money, to safety and sex for an entire nation? A spinoff series from "Radiolab," "More Perfect" dives into the rarefied world of the Supreme Court to explain how cases deliberated inside hallowed halls affect lives far away from the bench.

Emily Hanford

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that's supposed to ensure schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place.

This APM Reports documentary investigates why, and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Ellender Memorial Library, Nicholls State University

A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses.

Andy Vasoyan / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO continues our series of education documentaries from American Public Media. This week: the issues undocumented students face when they try to continue their education.

U.S. public schools must treat undocumented students like citizens. But once these students graduate, everything changes. Without papers, they don't qualify for federal college grants, they can't legally work to pay for tuition, and they may have to pay out-of-state tuition.

Emily Hanford / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO begins a series of four education documentaries from American Public Media. This week, in the first episode: understanding the issue of getting good teachers and, more importantly, keeping them.

There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers, but U.S. schools are struggling to attract and keep them. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, those most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump addressed the nation Monday night on U.S. engagement and "the path forward" in Afghanistan and South Asia. Senior U.S. officials told NPR's Tom Bowman ahead of the speech that the president is expected to deploy about 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan, though Trump did not give specifics during the speech. The decision follows months of deliberation within the Trump administration, involving top military commanders, political advisers and even enlisted veterans of the nearly 16-year war.

Jason Smith / WRVO News

It happened. The solar eclipse made its way across central and northern New York today. The moon covered around 60 percent of the sun this afternoon. And while the skies didn't go dark and nocturnal animals didn't come out to see what all the fuss was about, many were enjoying the partial eclipse.

Jason Smith, our morning host, was able to capture the eclipse through his camera, with a filter.

Reporter Tom Magnarelli stopped by the Rosamond Gifford Zoo for their solar eclipse viewing party.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher / NASA

The excitement has been building for weeks and weeks. Today, the solar eclipse is finally here. It will darken skies along a path from Oregon to South Carolina. It's the first eclipse that will be seen from coast to coast in 99 years. Millions will don special glasses or watch through pinhole projectors. Eclipse enthusiasts say totality never disappoints.

In central New York, you can expect the moon to partially block out the sun this afternoon, with peak happening just past 2:30 p.m.

WRVO Public Media seeks a Director of News and Public Affairs to lead our award-winning News Department. While this position is located on the campus of SUNY Oswego, this is not a New York State position.

Jim Mattis / Flickr

The Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing this morning about foreign agents and attempts to influence the U.S. election. The panel is among the bodies investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Senators had requested Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort, President Trump's former campaign chairman, to appear as witnesses. Instead, they are in closed-door discussions for now.

Masters of Scale

Jul 25, 2017

Hosted by LinkedIn co-founder and investor Reid Hoffman, "Masters of Scale" is an original series in which Hoffman tests his theories about how companies grow from zero to a gazillion. In conversation with famous founders, Hoffman connects the dots between fascinating disparate stories with the aim of illuminating big concepts and simple hacks that can change everything.

Hear these episodes through the end of August on WRVO.

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