9:54am

Mon August 6, 2012
Station Announcement

Campbell Debate: Is Religion Hurting Our Politics?

The Campbell Institute of Public Affairs at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University presents the second in a series of debates on timely issues of public importance, with a fresh, provocative format.

This debated aired August 5, 2012 on WRVO as part of the Campbell Debate series.

Proposition: This assembly believes religion is hurting our politics.
When: April 26th, 2012, 7 – 8:30 p.m., reception following
Where: Hosmer Auditorium, Everson Museum, 401 Harrison St, Syracuse
Seats: To ensure a seat, please RSVP to campbell@maxwell.syr.edu

For the Affirmative:
Tim Byrnes, Professor of Political Science, Colgate University; Author, Catholic Bishops in American Politics; and Panelist, WCNY’s “The Ivory Tower Half Hour”
Susan Thistlethwaite, Professor of Theology and former President, Chicago Theological Seminary; Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Author, Dreaming of Eden: American Religion and Politics in a Wired World; andWeekly “On Faith” columnist, The Washington Post

For the Negative:
Ken Klukowski, Director, Center for Religious Liberty, Family Research Council; Senior Fellow, American Civil Rights Union; and Co-author, The Blueprint: Obama’s Plan to Subvert the Constitution and Build an Imperial Presidency
Lawrence Mead, Professor of Political Science, New York University; Former visiting professor, Princeton University and Harvard University; and Author, Expanding Work Programs for Poor Men and The New Paternalism: Supervisory Approaches to Poverty

Employing a style adapted from the Oxford Union debates, each Campbell Debate will allow a gathered audience to consider a question of national, regional or local significance. Two panels comprised of thought leaders will argue for each side, followed by counterpoints and audience questions and comments. At the conclusion of the debate, the audience will vote on the proposition by walking out one of two doors. The format aims to showcase a lively, informative exchange of ideas on controversial issues and to stimulate thinking in a way that is not common to contemporary American political debates.

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