All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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3:50pm

Wed April 17, 2013
Agriculture

Farmers and foodies call for fracking ban

WBFO

A coalition of farmers and foodies are urging Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ban hydraulic fracturing in New York state right away. Groups across the state are expected to meet throughout the week to alert the public to the risks they believe fracking poses to the state’s agricultural viability.

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3:26pm

Wed April 17, 2013
Movie Reviews

Digging Into Ricky Jay's 'Deceptive' Card Tricks

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 8:37 pm

Veteran magician Ricky Jay reveals much about himself in a new documentary on his life of deception. His card-trick techniques? That may be another story.
Kino Lorber

When people talk about movie magic, they rarely mean card tricks. They're talking about digital wizardry and special effects.

But a new documentary called Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay is all about card tricks — and a man who has devoted his life to them.

Card artist Ricky Jay keeps up a constant stream of chatter in his act onstage — everything from gambling poems to stories about The Great Cardini — and it's all very entertaining, but the patter is designed to distract you from what he's doing.

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5:19pm

Tue April 16, 2013
It's All Politics

How Congress Quietly Overhauled Its Insider-Trading Law

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 5:46 pm

Vice President Biden and members of Congress watch as President Obama signs the STOCK Act on April 4, 2012. A year later, Congress moved to undo large portions of the law without fanfare.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

The legislative process on Capitol Hill is often slow and grinding. There are committee hearings, filibuster threats and hours of floor debate. But sometimes, when Congress really wants to get something done, it can move blindingly fast.

That's what happened when Congress moved to undo large parts of a popular law known as the STOCK Act last week.

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5:16pm

Tue April 16, 2013
It's All Politics

Background Check Battle: More Prosecution Or More Checks?

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 1:54 pm

Vice President Joe Biden, holds a background check form last week in Washington, as he calls on Congress to pass legislation aimed at reducing gun violence.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

One argument that some gun rights groups make against expanding background checks is that the federal government isn't doing a good enough job now of enforcing the law already on the books.

They point out that only a tiny fraction of people caught trying to buy a gun illegally are ever prosecuted.

But gun control supporters say that argument totally misses the point of background checks.

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5:16pm

Tue April 16, 2013
Music Interviews

Rachel Zeffira: An Opera 'Deserter' Embraces Dreamy Pop

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 6:46 am

Rachel Zeffira's debut solo album is titled The Deserters.
Yuval Hen Courtesy of the artist

Listening to her ethereal sound, you might not guess that Rachel Zeffira was classically trained as an opera singer. But on her solo debut, The Deserters, she's not just singing: She also plays piano, synthesizers, vibraphone, cathedral organ, violin, viola, oboe and English horn.

Zeffira makes her home in London now, but she grew up in a small town in rural British Columbia and began playing music at a young age.

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4:02pm

Tue April 16, 2013
The Upstate Economy

Kodak reaches potential deal to sell document imaging business

Kodak

Kodak is hoping to sell its document imaging business for $210 million. The company has reached a tentative deal with Brother Industries that would see them take over operation of the portfolio of scanners, capture software and services.

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12:15pm

Tue April 16, 2013
Politics

Maffei marks 100 days back in office by talking jobs

Rep. Dan Maffei (D-DeWitt) speaks with students at an event marking his first 100 days back in Congress.
Ryan Delaney WRVO file photo

Central New York's congressman has marked his first 100 days back in office by laying out a blueprint for jobs and the economy.

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9:37pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

15-Block Area Secured As Crime Scene After Boston Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And NPR's Tovia Smith joins us now from Boston. And, Tovia, let's recap the chronology just a little bit. Two explosions about 10 seconds apart, very close by at the finish line, correct?

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9:37pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

At Least Three People Killed In Boston Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

More than 100 people injured, and police now say at least three people killed by the explosions today at the Boston Marathon. Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick says the FBI is now leading multiply agencies in an investigation, and security has been tightened across Boston.

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9:37pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Investigators Cautious About Providing Details In Boston Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Investigators are gathering evidence related to the blasts. Law-enforcement officials have been cautious about providing any details. NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston is here with the latest. And Dina, do investigators have any leads?

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8:37pm

Mon April 15, 2013
NPR Story

Obama: 'Make No Mistake, We Will Get To The Bottom Of This'

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:58 pm

President Obama addressed the nation after explosions at the Boston Marathon left multiple people injured on Monday.

8:37pm

Mon April 15, 2013
NPR Story

No Suspects In Custody In Boston Terror Attack

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block have the latest on the explosions at the Boston Marathon near the race's fourth hour.

8:37pm

Mon April 15, 2013
NPR Story

Boston ER Doctor Reports Battlefield-Style Injuries

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And now, a firsthand account of the emergency response to the attacks. We're going to hear from a Boston doctor who spoke with our co-host Audie Cornish.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Joining us now is Dr. Michael Gibson. He's a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He's been seeing the victims of today's explosions in Boston in the emergency room at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Gibson, to begin, what kind of injuries are you seeing? What's coming into the emergency room there?

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6:06pm

Mon April 15, 2013
NPR Story

An Update On The Boston Marathon Explosions

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. We begin this hour with the horrific story unfolding today out of Boston. Just over four hours into the Boston Marathon, two explosions ripped into a crowd of onlookers and runners not far from the finish line. Boston Police have confirmed at least two people dead, and 23 injured. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick spoke just moments ago, along with the city's police commissioner, Ed Davis.

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4:50pm

Mon April 15, 2013
All Tech Considered

Speak Up! Advertisers Want You To Talk With New Apps

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Drinks columnist David Wondrich is seen on Esquire's new Talk to Esquire app, which allows users to interact with several of the magazine's columnists through voice recognition.
Screengrab via YouTube

Imagine for a second what it would be like if you could talk to your radio, and your radio would actually listen. To get an idea of what this might be like, I downloaded an app called Talk to Esquire, from the magazine of the same name.

When I opened it, the app asked me a question: What's your favorite type of liquor? That's a little forward, but it's Esquire so I played along and told the app that I'm more of a beer drinker.

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4:46pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Around the Nation

Exoneree Detectives Fight For Those Still Behind Bars

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 9:35 am

Dallas exonerees Christopher Scott (center) and Richard Miles, accompanied by Scott's girlfriend, Kelly Gindratt, prepare to be honored in the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, in March.
Courtesy of Jamie Meltzer Freedom Fighters Documentary

Christopher Scott, Johnnie Lindsey and Billy Smith drive down a desolate highway toward a prison in East Texas. They've all been there before, serving hard time — 63 years among the three of them.

But this time it's different. They're driving a Hummer. They're dressed to the nines. And they're on a mission. They aim to get an inmate out — a friend of Scott's named Jimmy O'Steen, aka Big O. But this will be a slow-motion prison break. Scott, Lindsey and Smith are all exonerated prisoners.

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4:26pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Code Switch

Dumbfoundead: A Rising Star In A Genre In Transition

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:02 pm

Korean American rap artist, Dumbfoundead performs at the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C., on March 26.
Lauren Rock for NPR

7:25pm

Sun April 14, 2013
Music Interviews

Nick Drake's Producer Remembers 'A Real Musician's Musician'

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:33 pm

The cover photo from Nick Drake's 1969 debut, Five Leaves Left, produced by Joe Boyd.
Album cover

English folk musician Nick Drake died decades before the song "Pink Moon" found him a wide audience, thanks to a series of Volkswagen ads back in 1999. They sparked a resurgence of interest in Drake's work — music largely ignored in his day but now inspiring legions of young musicians.

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4:52pm

Sun April 14, 2013
NPR Story

Is Immigration Overhaul On America's Doorstep?

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, the death of a man who could be the most influential pastor you've never heard of. But first, in Spanish, the words el camino means the road, but it can also mean the way. El camino rios, the way to the river. El camino de dias, a religious path.

And for millions, certainly the path to immigration overhaul in the U.S. has been elusive and full of fervor. Witness a rally this past week at the Capitol.

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4:52pm

Sun April 14, 2013
NPR Story

Street Artists Protest Status Quo In Haiti

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In Haiti, a group of artists is making a name for themselves by creating huge metal sculptures and showing them on the streets. They call themselves Haiti's Resistance Artists, and their work speaks to the devastation following the 2010 earthquake and the stark separation between the country's rich and poor. Reese Erlich has their story.

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4:40pm

Sun April 14, 2013
World

As Arctic Ice Melts, It's A Free-For-All For Oil ... And Tusks

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 11:47 am

After being frozen for thousands of years in a Siberian riverbed, this pristine mammoth tusk is a financial boon to the hunter who found it.
Evgenia Arbugaeva National Geographic Magazine

It's widely known that the world's icecaps are melting. While most people are focused on what we're losing, some have considered what might be gained by the disappearance of all that ice.

In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey released a report estimating that 13 percent of the world's remaining undiscovered oil and 30 percent of the remaining undiscovered natural gas could be in the Arctic.

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6:27pm

Sat April 13, 2013
Music Interviews

Thao Nguyen's Musical Life Is Far From 'Common'

Thao & The Get Down Stay Down's new album is titled We The Common.
Nick Walker Courtesy of the artist

Thao Nguyen, of the folk-rock group Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, has been on a musical journey since she started performing in her teens in Northern Virginia. Delicate yet fierce in her vocal delivery, she writes often about her social concerns — and it was a trip to a California women's prison that inspired much of her latest album, We the Common.

Ngyuen and her band are on the road for the first time in several years; she spoke with NPR's Jacki Lyden from a tour stop in Kansas City.

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5:43pm

Sat April 13, 2013
Movies

Jurassic Bark: How Sound Design Changed Our Imaginations

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:15 pm

A single trumpet from a baby elephant at the San Francisco Zoo was used for every single T. Rex roar in Jurassic Park.
Universal Pictures

Nobody actually knows what dinosaurs sound like. But if you can imagine the roar of a T. Rex or the bellow of a brachiosaurus, it's probably thanks to the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, which turns 20 this summer.

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5:11pm

Sat April 13, 2013
All Tech Considered

When Digital Dust Is Gathered, Constellation May Be Muddled

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

The Orion nebula is the brightest spot in the sword of the Orion, or the Hunter constellation.
NASA

That constellation of information known as Big Data can be a sight to behold.

Adam Frank of NPR's 13.7 blog explains Big Data as "the ability to understand (and control) a seemingly chaotic world on levels never before imagined."

Big Data is like gathering digital dust, says New Yorker tech blogger Gary Marcus. "It's a very valuable tool," he says, "but it's rarely the whole solution by itself."

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5:02pm

Sat April 13, 2013
Sports

Down To The Putt: Golf Analytics Gain Traction

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

Numbers crunching has become a big deal in sports. Analytics have been slower to take hold in the tradition-bound game of golf, but it is happening. NPR's Tom Goldman reports on the phenomenon from the tournament most steeped in tradition, the Masters.

5:02pm

Sat April 13, 2013
Politics

Week In News: Guns In U.S., Threats Abroad

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 6:09 pm

The gun control debate continued to dominate the news this week with President Obama coming out strongly in support of reforming the current gun control laws alongside the Newtown families. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, about that story along with the bird flu in China, North Korea and the Postal Service.

5:44pm

Fri April 12, 2013
It's All Politics

'We Have To Do More': Michelle Obama's Next Four Years

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:07 pm

First lady Michelle Obama greets students at Harper High School in Chicago on Wednesday. Twenty-nine current or former Harper students have been shot in the past year, eight of them fatally.
Nancy Stone AP

This week marked a new step in Michelle Obama's evolution as first lady. In her hometown of Chicago, she delivered one of the most emotional speeches of her career — about kids dying from gun violence.

"I'm not talking about something that's happening in a war zone halfway around the world," she said. "I am talking about what's happening in the city that we call home."

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5:20pm

Fri April 12, 2013
The Record

The Music Of The Venezuelan Presidential Campaigns

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:07 pm

Alvaro Perez volunteers as a DJ at a socialist party stand in Caracas, Venezuela, playing songs in support of candidate Nicolas Maduro.
Jasmine Garsd NPR

On Sunday, voters in Venezuela will head to the polls, and in Caracas, the noise level is as high as voters' emotions. There is a background noise that accompanies everyday life in Latin America, a constant soundtrack: music blaring from food stands and cars, loud automobiles that are so run-down they defy the laws of physics, street vendors yelling product names. I've spoken to many immigrants to the U.S. who, like me, first arrived to live in the suburbs and found the absence of bochinche, or ruckus, maddening.

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4:34pm

Fri April 12, 2013
Health

Research study could lead to new test for colon cancer

Dr. David Halleran is participating in a nationwide study of a new way to screen for colon cancer.

Researchers at Upstate Medical Center are helping in a nationwide study that could change the way people are screened for colon cancer, and the potential to change the way one of the most dreaded medical screening tests is used.

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4:29pm

Fri April 12, 2013
Media

Great Long-Form Journalism, Just Clicks Away

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:12 am

As newspapers around the country struggle with declining subscription rates and smaller staffs, passionate, long-form digital storytelling is creating new ways of delivering richly detailed reporting.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

In the age of hundreds of cable channels, millions of 140-character bulletins and an untold number of cat videos, a fear has been growing among journalists and readers that long-form storytelling may be getting lost.

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