All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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4:25pm

Fri September 14, 2012
NPR Story

Week In Politics: Chicago Teacher Strike, Libya Attack

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 5:50 pm

Audie Cornish talks to regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss the Chicago teachers strike and the attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya.

4:25pm

Fri September 14, 2012
NPR Story

Indian Cartoonist Charged With Sedition

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:33 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A cartoonist in India is at the center of a storm over freedom of expression. He's been charged with sedition after satirizing corruption in India's parliament. At a hearing in Mumbai today, a court criticized the severity of the charges.

But NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from New Delhi, the case is not yet over.

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4:25pm

Fri September 14, 2012
NPR Story

Baltimore Orioles' Success A Surprise Of The Season

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 5:50 pm

Audie Cornish talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about Major League Baseball's pennant races.

2:50pm

Fri September 14, 2012
Planet Money

Even If You're All-Powerful, It's Hard To Fix The Economy

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:43 pm

This guy lives in a computer. Can you get him a job?
Walt Disney Pictures The Kobal Collection

The world inside Mark Zandi's computer model feels pretty familiar. It's full of people who are worried about the economy. Their homes are being foreclosed on. They're paying more for gas. Something like 13 million of them can't find jobs.

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7:53pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Salt

A Little Patience, A Lot Of Salt Are Keys To A Lost Pickle Recipe

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:45 pm

There's more than one way to make a pickle.
iStockphoto.com

Here's a new mantra you might consider adding to your list of daily kitchen chants: "It takes patience to perpetuate pickles."

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4:37pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Education

Teacher Evaluation Dispute Echoes Beyond Chicago

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:19 pm

One of the primary disputes in the Chicago Public Schools teachers' strike is over Mayor Rahm Emanuel's proposal to link teacher pay to student performance.
Robert Ray AP

One of the primary issues at the heart of the the Chicago teachers' strike is whether student test scores should be used to evaluate teachers and determine their pay. Mayor Rahm Emanuel is pushing that approach, as are other officials around the nation.

But many teachers insist that it's inherently unfair to grade their teaching based on their students' learning.

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4:32pm

Thu September 13, 2012
NPR Story

Stealth Changes To Fast Food May Combat Obesity

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Fast food giant McDonald's announced a big move yesterday to begin posting calories on menu boards. It's also making smaller changes designed to help Americans make healthier choices; smaller changes you might not even notice.

But NPR's Allison Aubrey reports they can make a real difference.

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4:18pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Music Reviews

ZZ Top: Taking The Blues Back To The Future

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:19 pm

ZZ Top's new album, La Futura, is its first in nine years.
Ross Halfin

Over the years, ZZ Top has stayed contemporary: dabbling in new wave, flirting with grunge and techno, making goofy music videos, even using a drum machine. But the band has never strayed too far from its classic amalgam of electric blues, garage rock and greasy grooves. On their new album, La Futura, the members sound like their old selves.

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4:02pm

Thu September 13, 2012
It's All Politics

Can A Republican Win A Senate Seat In Blue Hawaii?

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:19 pm

Former Hawaii Gov. Linda Lingle gives a victory speech in Honolulu after winning the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate on Aug. 11.
Marco Garcia AP

Republican hopes of capturing the Senate in November rest on a handful of tossup races in states like Montana, Missouri and Virginia.

Surprisingly, some analysts also are putting Hawaii in the tossup column.

Hawaii is the bluest of blue states; it hasn't elected a Republican to the Senate since 1970. But with the retirement of 22-year incumbent Daniel Akaka, Republicans believe they have a chance.

And regardless of who wins, the state will have its first female senator come January.

In Hawaii, the language of politics is a little different.

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3:51pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Politics and Government

New York counties want state to take more action against bath salts

County governments want New York state to take a tougher stand on bath salts.  The Association of Counties, meeting this week in Syracuse, is calling for a state law to criminalize the synthetic drug.

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2:17pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Two-Way

'All That's Great About America': Nation Bids Neil Armstrong Farewell

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:19 pm

Members of the congregation stand at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington during the national memorial service for the first man to walk on the moon, Neil Armstrong.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

Hundreds packed the Washington National Cathedral today to pay their respects to Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon.

Perhaps the most amazing tribute came from Eugene Cernan, the man who followed in Armstrong's footsteps and became the last man to walk on the moon during the 1972 Apollo 17 mission.

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1:56pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Africa

Gorillas And Guerrillas Share The Troubled Congo

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:19 pm

Patrick Karabaranga, a warden at the Virunga National Park, plays with an orphaned mountain gorilla at the park headquarters in Rumangabo, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, on July 17. The Virunga park is home to about 200 mountain gorillas, approximately a quarter of the world's population.
Phil Moore AFP/Getty Images

When crossing from Uganda into Congo at the shabby border town of Bunagana, I encountered a broadly smiling man in a black leather jacket named Hamid Kashaisha.

He asked if I wanted to see the gorillas. I replied that it's guerrillas — with guns, that is — that I wanted to see: the M23 rebels who, for the past two months, had occupied a piece of real estate in eastern Congo larger than Delaware.

That was no deterrence to the pitchman.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Remembrances

Ambassador To Libya Was Passionate About His Work

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This morning, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said this about the slain ambassador, Christopher Stevens.

SECRETARY HILLARY CLINTON: He risked his life to stop a tyrant, then gave his life trying to help build a better Libya. The world needs more Chris Stevenses.

BLOCK: Earlier this year, before Chris Stevens assumed his position as ambassador to Libya, he made a video, subtitled in Arabic, directed to the Libyan people. It was posted on the U.S. Embassy's website and on YouTube.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO CLIP)

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Digital Life

Facebook Could Be Powerful Tool In Targeting Voters

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Every election season Republicans and Democrats tried to rally their base and to go after undecided voters. They're increasingly using the Internet in Get Out The Vote efforts.

NPR correspondent Shankar Vedantam, who reports on social science research, joins me now to talk about how Facebook could become a potent weapon in going after the biggest untapped voting bloc in the nation. Shankar, welcome.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, Melissa.

BLOCK: Who are these mystery voters, this untapped voting bloc that we mentioned?

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Technology

Apple's New iPhone 5 Is Thinner, Lighter Than Before

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Apple introduced its newest iPhone today, and it's thinner and larger than the last. The company also introduced a new line of iPods. NPR's Laura Sydell has more.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: The new iPhone has a four-inch screen, and it's about 20 percent lighter. Apple CEO Tim Cook engaged in typical Apple boosting as he spoke about the iPhone 5.

TIM COOK: The thinnest, lightest and best iPhone we have ever shipped.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Africa

Clinton: Libya Attack Was By 'Small, Savage Group'

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 9:45 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

SECRETARY HILLARY CLINTON: This is an attack that should shock the conscience of people of all faiths around the world.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Sports

Same-Sex Marriage Finds New Support In NFL

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Support for same-sex marriage has come from what seems an unlikely corner - the NFL. Two NFL players have been vocal in urging support for same-sex marriage in ballot initiatives this fall. Well, that position from linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo of the Baltimore Ravens drew the ire of a Maryland delegate, Emmett Burns, who urged the Ravens to silence their player.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Politics

New Politics Emerge In Aurora, Colo., After Shooting

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The deadly movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colorado has become a key issue in at least two tight congressional races in that battleground state. Since the attacks, two Democratic candidates - running in districts in and around Aurora - have called for stricter gun laws. But Republicans have accused them of trying to politicize the tragedy.

From member station KUNC, Kirk Siegler reports.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Sports

Cameron Apologizes For 1989 U.K. Sporting Disaster

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. British Prime Minister David Cameron apologized today for a pattern of lies and official cover-ups over Britain's worst sporting disaster. Ninety-six soccer fans were crushed to death at the Hillsborough Stadium in the city of Sheffield in 1989 and then falsely blamed for the disaster. Vicki Barker reports from London.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Africa

Attack On U.S. Consulate In Libya Grew Out Of Protest

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We'll hear more from Secretary Clinton in a moment, but first to Benghazi and to Reuters' Middle East correspondent, Hadeel Al-Shalchi, who's been trying to piece together what happened.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Africa

Many Questions Remain After U.S. Consulate Attack

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In this hour of the program, we remember Christopher Stevens, the first sitting U.S. ambassador killed in more than 30 years. And we'll explore how the attacks in Libya and Egypt have become fodder for political debate.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
U.S.

Sharp Differences Dull U.S. Influence On Euro Crisis

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The eurozone crisis has weighed heavily on the global economy and it will remain a central foreign-policy challenge for President Obama or Mitt Romney, whichever man wins in November. The Obama administration has repeatedly urged eurozone countries to shift their focus from austerity to growth. This week, we're focusing on foreign policy issues facing the next administration.

And NPR's Sylvia Poggioli has this story on the eurozone.

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5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Education

Head Of Chicago Teachers Union Rose The Ranks

At the center of the Chicago teachers' strike are Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the head of the teachers' union, Karen Lewis. To learn more about Lewis and the relationship between the teachers' union and the mayor's office, Audie Cornish talks to Joel Hood, education reporter at the Chicago Tribune.

5:58pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Africa

U.S. Sends Marines To Libya After Consulate Attack

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We turn now to Washington for more reaction to this brazen attack. The Obama administration is sending a Marine anti-terrorism unit to bolster security in Libya. It's also taking precautions elsewhere. The stepped up security comes as the State Department mourns its losses. NPR's Michele Kelemen has that story.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Shock and sadness hovered over the State Department as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke of the devastating losses of four foreign service personnel.

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5:39pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Religion

Anti-Islam Film May Be Connected To Libya Attack

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to hear more now about the film that was, at least in part, the catalyst for the violence in Libya, as well as protests in Egypt. Some news outlets are saying the filmmaker has gone into hiding.

As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, very few people have actually seen the supposed two-hour movie, if it exists at all.

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5:39pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Presidential Race

Romney Criticizes Obama's Response To Libya Attack

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It didn't take long for the attacks in Benghazi and Cairo to become part of the presidential campaign. Mitt Romney jumped in first. In a statement last night before Ambassador Stevens' death had been announced, Romney accused President Obama of sympathizing with those who waged the assault. The Obama campaign responded, saying it was shocked that Romney would launch a, quote, "political attack" at this moment. And the politics have continued today as NPR's Mara Liasson reports.

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5:35pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Politics

SUNY Oswego is ready to Rock the Vote

Graduate history major Jon Zella of the Civic Engagement Coalition and graduate human-computer interaction major Phillip Moore look over promotion for the Rock the Vote campaign.
Jim Russell SUNY Oswego

The youth vote famously played a large role in Barack Obama’s victory in 2008, but one of the big questions of this year’s election is how young voter turnout will compare with that of the previous election. This year, SUNY Oswego is playing its part in helping students register to vote.

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5:02pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Europe

Germany Clears Next Big Step For Eurozone Recovery

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Europe's debt crisis has caused havoc, toppling governments, breaking banks, leaving a multitude of young people without jobs. Now there's a glimmer of hope.

As NPR's Philip Reeves reports, today, Germany's highest court cleared the way for the next big step in the eurozone's grand plan to save itself.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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4:59pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Portland, Ore., Becomes Latest Fluoride Battleground

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:58 pm

Demonstrator China Starshine holds up signs outside of City Hall in Portland last week.
Ross William Hamilton The Oregonian/AP

Over jeers and cheers from the audience, commissioners on the Portland, Ore., City Council voted Wednesday to add fluoride to the city's drinking water starting in 2014.

Portland is the largest American city that doesn't add fluoride to its drinking water. But some groups have raised questions about the possible risks from fluoridation and oppose its use.

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4:51pm

Wed September 12, 2012
Education

Rahm Emanuel Walking A High Wire With Teachers

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

It's the third day of the teachers' strike in Chicago. For the first time in 25 years, teachers are on the picket line and 350,000 students are out of class. The strike poses a unique challenge for Chicago's Mayor Rahm Emanuel. That's because he's also one of President Obama's top fund-raisers and surrogates.

From Chicago, NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

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