All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
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12:36pm

Tue October 30, 2012
China: Change Or Crisis

In China, A Ceaseless Quest To Silence Dissent

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:06 pm

A bloodied woman is helped by demonstrators after clashes with police in a protest against an industrial waste pipeline in Qidong, Jiangsu province, on July 28. The Chinese government devotes enormous resources to suppressing dissent, but opposition to government policies is increasingly common.
Carlos Barria Reuters/Landov

China is about to get new leaders for the first time in a decade, and it comes at a crucial moment for the world's most populous nation. Economic growth, which surged for decades, has slowed. Demands for political reform have increased and the Communist Party has been hit by scandal. In a series of stories this week, NPR is examining the multiple challenges facing China. In this story, Louisa Lim looks at China's pervasive efforts to maintain order.

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9:39pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Parts Of Manhattan Go Dark As Sandy Rolls Through

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 9:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The storm on the East Coast is making a devastating impression on New York City. Storm surge coupled with a high tide have swelled the water to record levels in some places that includes Battery Park, and now, reports of flooding in the subway and in automotive tunnels.

NPR's Margot Adler joins us from New York with more details. And, Margot, what can you tell us about these reports of flooding?

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8:35pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Sandy Makes Landfall Near Atlantic City

Robert Siegel talks with Associated Press correspondent Katie Zezima, who was in Atlantic City, N.J., close to where Sandy made landfall.

7:55pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Millions Without Power As Sandy Makes Landfall

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Already more than a million people from Maine to Virginia have lost electricity because of the storm. And in one case, as we heard a few minutes ago, the utility Consolidated Edison took the unusual step of cutting off power to parts of lower Manhattan. By the time the storm is over, more than 10 million homes and businesses in the eastern U.S. could lose electricity. That's according to the utility industry.

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4:38pm

Mon October 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Pew Poll: Race Evens Up, But Romney Holds Turnout Advantage

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 6:02 pm

Mitt Romney speaks Monday at a campaign event at Avon Lake High School in Avon Lake, Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

A poll released Monday by the Pew Research Center shows that President Obama has failed to regain much of the support he lost in the days after the first presidential debate.

The poll shows that among likely voters, the race is now a statistical dead heat with both Obama and Mitt Romney receiving 47 percent support. Among registered voters there is what Pew calls a "statistically insignificant two-point edge" of 47 percent to 45 percent for Obama.

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4:38pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Want To Be Rich? Be Lucky, Know The Right People

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:42 am

Michael and Amy Tiemann estimate their personal wealth at about $25 million — and say luck played no small part in their financial success.
Art Silverman NPR

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, dependency and the role of government.

And while it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? And what do we think explains our prosperity — or lack thereof?

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4:24pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Law

Despite Hurricane, Justices Hear Surveillance Case

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 6:22 pm

The rest of the government may have been shut down for the hurricane, but not the U.S. Supreme Court.

The justices were in court Monday to consider a challenge to the 2008 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, known as FISA. The new law broadly expanded the government's ability to conduct large-scale monitoring of international phone calls and emails to and from people in the United States.

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12:01pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:33 am

A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.
Gerry Broome AP

Here are a few reasons government forecasters at the National Hurricane Center and emergency management officials are so concerned about Sandy:

1. Sandy is one of the largest hurricanes ever to strike the U.S. Sandy's winds cover an area of more than 1,000 miles in diameter. That's enormous by hurricane standards. So instead of affecting an area a couple of hundred miles across, Sandy will cut a huge swath. That means many millions of people are probably going to be exposed to high winds, heavy rains, and, for those on the coast, powerful storm surge.

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11:24am

Mon October 29, 2012
China: Change Or Crisis

China's New Leaders Inherit Country At A Crossroads

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 10:53 am

"The Defense of Yan'an" re-enacts a 1947 battle to protect Mao Zedong's Communist stronghold during the Chinese Civil War from the Nationalists, who fled to Taiwan.
Louisa Lim NPR

China is about to get new leaders for the first time in a decade, and it comes at a sensitive moment for the world's most populous nation. Economic growth, which surged for decades, has slowed. Demands for political reform have increased and the Communist Party has been hit by scandal. In a series of stories this week, NPR is examining the multiple challenges facing China. In our first story, Louisa Lim looks at how the Chinese view the Communist Party in the place where it took shape.

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6:33pm

Sun October 28, 2012
NPR Story

Three-Minute Fiction: 'Speechless,' 'Harding'

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

You know what the ticking means. It's time for Three-Minute Fiction, our contest where we ask you for original stories that can be read in about three minutes. Our judge in this round, the thriller writer Brad Meltzer, the challenge: to write a story that revolves around a U.S. president who could be fictional or real. And, of course, the story had to be 600 words or less. We received nearly 4,000 entries, and here are two that stood out.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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5:03pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Author Interviews

Stories Of The Power of Language, 'Found In Translation'

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 10:41 am

iStockphoto.com

Translation is everywhere — that's is the crux of a new book by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche: Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms our World.

From NASA to the U.N. to Chinese tattoo parlors, the book looks high and low for stories of the undeniable importance of language. One of those stories centers on a man named Peter Less, 91, an inspiration of sorts to interpreters and translators everywhere.

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5:03pm

Sun October 28, 2012
NPR Story

Getting Out The Vote: The Last-Minute Political Push

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:33 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden, in for Guy Raz.

NPR is keeping an eye on the progress of Hurricane Sandy as it heads up the East Coast. We'll update you on that in a moment. The weather is now officially dominating the headlines but not entirely. We do have an election on November 6th.

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3:26pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Science

Millennia Of Stargazing At 'African Cosmos' Exhibit

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:33 pm

Untitled, by South African artist Gavin Jantjes, is one of the works in the "African Cosmos" exhibition.
National Museum of African Art

3:18pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Commentary

Around The River Bend, A Flood Of History

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 7:41 pm

The Ho-Chunk Indians still consider the river to be sacred, and it's easy to feel that calm, floating along the Bark.
Liam O'Leary

The Bark River is my backyard, childhood river. And yet, in a lifetime of travel, I'd never explored it.

I knew it carved the land from the Ice Age to settlement times, from the Black Hawk War of 1832 (in which young Abraham Lincoln appears) to the era of grist mills. But the Bark also flows past impressive Indian mounds. It nurtured poets, naturalists and farmers.

When former Marquette University professor Milton Bates published his Bark River Chronicles through the Wisconsin State Historical Society, I jumped at the chance to learn about the river with him.

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6:51pm

Sat October 27, 2012
Economy

Bust To Boom: Why Housing Matters, Economically

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

A construction worker finishes a roof in Chicago on Oct. 12. Signs of recovery in the housing market are springing up nationwide, but there's still a ways to go.
Nam Y. Huh AP

The economy has peppered political speeches for much of the presidential campaign. But talk of creating jobs has stolen thunder from the housing market.

The epic housing collapse four years ago was a key ingredient in creating the Great Recession in the first place. Plus, boosting the housing market can be a boon for overall economic recovery.

Beginning A 'Long-Term Cycle'

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6:20pm

Sat October 27, 2012
Music Interviews

Beth Orton: 'These Songs Are My Little Bit Of Sugar'

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

Beth Orton's latest album is called Sugaring Season.
Jo Metson Scott Courtesy of the artist

In the late 1990s, Beth Orton set the music world buzzing with her singular sound: part folk, part electronica. But six years ago, she found herself at a life-changing juncture: pregnant with her first child — and dropped from her record label.

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5:17pm

Sat October 27, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Lemon': From Rikers To N.Y.'s Famous Public Theater

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 12:24 pm

Cinema Libre

His story begins a decade ago in Brooklyn, where he grew up fighting in New York's public housing before discovering another kind of power. After three felony convictions and time served at Rikers Island, Lemon Andersen didn't have many places to turn except to his words. Now he's a Tony Award winner with a rave-reviewed one-man show called County of Kings.

He spoke with weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden about his life and the new independent documentary film about it, called simply, Lemon.

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4:54pm

Sat October 27, 2012
NPR Story

Candidates Sprint To Election In Tight Contest

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I'm asking for your vote, and I'm asking you to vote early.

MITT ROMNEY: It matters. This race matters. You know how big this race is.

LYDEN: The candidates making their last swings through the swing states a week and a half before Election Day. James Fallows of The Atlantic joins us as he does most Saturdays. Hello there, Jim.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Jacki.

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4:28pm

Sat October 27, 2012
The Salt

For The Love Of Cheese, Diners Unite In Italy

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 9:46 am

An inspector checks a wheel of Reggiano cheese at the Parmigiano-Reggiano storehouse in Bibbiano, Italy. Earthquakes rocked the region, sending the cheese toppling.
Marco Vasini AP

In Italy tonight, everyone's having the same thing for dinner, and there's no doubt that it's going to smell terrific.

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4:27pm

Sat October 27, 2012
It's All Politics

Tiny N.H. Draws Big Money And Names To Gubernatorial Race

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

Democrat Maggie Hassan and Republican Ovide Lamontagne talk during a break in their gubernatorial debate in Henniker, N.H., on Oct. 4.
Jim Cole AP

There are 11 gubernatorial races this fall, and one of the most competitive is in the swing state of New Hampshire.

There, Republican Ovide Lamontagne and Democrat Maggie Hassan are vying to replace a popular Democrat who opted not to seek a fifth term. Both political parties and outside advocacy groups are pushing hard in a race where neither candidate enjoys a clear edge.

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5:33pm

Fri October 26, 2012
World

What's A Lake Doing In The Middle Of The Desert?

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 5:37 pm

A midas fly touches down on the sands of the desert in the United Arab Emirates. A lake in the area has brought new forms of wildlife, but some scientists are concerned it could harm the habitat of the midas fly.
Brigitte Howarth

One place you don't expect to see waves lapping against the shore is in the middle of a desert. But that's exactly what's happening deep inside the United Arab Emirates, where a recently formed lake is nestled into the sand dunes, and a new ecosystem is emerging.

Drive through the desert in the United Arab Emirates, and all you see mile after mile are red, rolling dunes. Maybe some occasional trees or shrubs, but otherwise a dry, red sandscape.

And then, suddenly, a bright blue spot comes into view. It must be a mirage, you think. But it's not.

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5:04pm

Fri October 26, 2012
Author Interviews

History Inspired Travel Tales Of Donoghue's 'Astray'

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 6:29 am

A young mother sets sail from Ireland after the potato famine to meet her husband in Canada; two gold prospectors seek their fortune in the frozen Yukon; a slave poisons his master and the master's wife escapes with him.

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4:43pm

Fri October 26, 2012
National Security

As Jihadists Spread, Connecting The Dots Proves Hard

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 5:57 pm

The Ansar Dine group in northeastern Mali is among the Islamist factions proliferating in North Africa and the Middle East. Officials have focused on possible links between these groups and al-Qaida, but counterterrorism experts say understanding the differences is just as important.
Adama Diarra Reuters /Landov

More than a year after popular protests rocked the Arab world, U.S. intelligence officials are struggling to understand the myriad of Islamist groups that have filled the vacuum.

Those groups run the gamut from moderate believers who are willing to give the political process a try to violent extremists. The difficulty is figuring out which is which.

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4:43pm

Fri October 26, 2012
Remembrances

Cultural Historian Jacques Barzun Dies At 104

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 5:57 pm

Pioneering cultural historian Jacques Barzun was the author of dozens of books and essays on everything from philosophy to music to baseball. He died Thursday in San Antonio at the age of 104.
Eric Gay AP

Jacques Barzun, one of the most influential historians, educators and thinkers of the 20th century, died Thursday, just one month shy of his 105th birthday. Barzun seemed to have a limitless capacity to understand and translate complex ideas — about the evolution of Western culture, what it means to be free, and even the value of American baseball. He shared his observations in numerous books and magazine articles and at Columbia University, where he held forth for half a century.

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4:31pm

Fri October 26, 2012
Regional Coverage

Rose-laying ceremony at SU remembers victims of Pan-Am Flight 103

An SU Remembrance Scholar lays down a rose in memory of a victim of the Pan-Am Flight 103 bombing.
Durrie Lawrence WRVO

Bells tolled at 2:03 p.m. Friday as Syracuse University remembered an event that shook the campus community 24 years ago.

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4:24pm

Fri October 26, 2012
Technology

New fingerprint reader is 100 times more accurate

Sporting multiple generations of its biometric technology, UltraScan CEO John Schneider holds what he claims is his company's holy grail: an ultrasonic chip that produces a more accurate fingerprint.
Daniel Robison Innovation Trail/WBFO

One small upstate tech company is poised for its big break. A few months ago, UltraScan announced a new invention for reading fingerprints that’s up to 100 times more accurate than current methods. The company thinks their invention will fundamentally change how we identify ourselves and pay for purchases.

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4:20pm

Fri October 26, 2012
It's All Politics

Economists: Romney's 12 Million Jobs Target Realistic, Even If He Loses

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 5:57 pm

Alan Shull attends a job fair in Portland, Ore., on April 24.
Rick Bowmer AP

As the election draws closer, the economy and jobs remain top issues in the presidential race.

President Obama points to the improvement in the labor market since he took office in the midst of a downward spiral.

Both he and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney have five-point plans for improving the economy, although their strategies differ.

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4:06pm

Fri October 26, 2012
Politics

Poll predicts Gillibrand "blow out" win

A new poll finds that Democrat incumbent Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is poised for a record breaking win on election day, with a more than 40-point lead over Republican challenger Wendy Long.

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3:54pm

Fri October 26, 2012
The Two-Way

Family Of China's Premier Is Really, Really Rich - China Doesn't Want People To Know

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 5:57 pm

Chinese premier Wen Jiabao.
Andy Wong AP

An explosive report from the New York Times today spelled out just how wealthy the relatives of Chinese prime minister Wen Jiabao are. Try $2.7 billion dollars in assets. This startling news so angered Chinese officials that the Times' website was quickly shut down in China.

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7:17am

Fri October 26, 2012
The Two-Way

If Sandy Becomes 'Frankenstorm,' It Could Be Worst In A Century

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 10:52 am

National Hurricane Center's "5-day forecast cone" at 2 p.m. ET today (Oct. 26).
www.nhc.noaa.gov

"We're not trying to hype it," National Weather Service meterologist Paul Kocin tells Bloomberg News. "What we're seeing in some of our models is a storm at an intensity that we have not seen in this part of the country in the past century."

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