All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
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5:42pm

Sat August 11, 2012
It's All Politics

From 'Very Excited' To Predicting 'Disaster': What Wis. Says About Paul Ryan

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 10:23 pm

U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. stands during a listening session in April 2011 in Kenosha, Wis. He is now presidential candidate Mitt Romney's running mate.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

News that Paul Ryan was chosen as Mitt Romney's running mate had people in his hometown of Janesville, Wis., abuzz Saturday morning. But the strong feelings Ryan provokes elsewhere for and against his policies were also evident.

On her way into the Janesville post office, Corrine Smith has a smile on her face. She and her husband are both big Paul Ryan supporters, and they were thrilled when they heard the news.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

Ryan, With 'Alternative Agenda,' Had Quick GOP Rise

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

MITT ROMNEY: It's an honor to announce my running mate and the next vice president of the United States, Paul Ryan.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

Paul Ryan's Agenda: Now Romney's?

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's go now to Vin Weber, former Minnesota congressman and a senior adviser to Mitt Romney. Vin Weber, thanks for joining us.

VIN WEBER: Great to be with you today.

RAZ: You have known Paul Ryan for a long time, since before he was a member of Congress. How did you know him?

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

That's The Ticket: Romney And Ryan Kick Off Tour

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

And as we've been reporting, Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan has joined Mitt Romney on the GOP presidential ticket. The two men launched a multiday, multistate bus tour this morning. They spent much of the day in Virginia where crowds came out to cheer them on, including in Ashland, where Paul Ryan spoke.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

The Possible Future Of Health Care, Given VP Pick

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

So what makes Paul Ryan such a bold pick and potentially such a risky one is the detailed budget plan he has now twice passed through the GOP-controlled House. That plan has not passed the Senate, and President Obama says if it reached his desk, he'd veto it. The heart of Ryan's plan calls for dramatic changes to the nation's largest government health programs, Medicare and Medicaid.

With us now to discuss what those changes could mean for the campaign and the country should Romney and Ryan win the race is NPR's Julie Rovner. Julie, hello.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

What An Ayn Rand View Could Do To Romney's Campaign

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:31 pm

Mitt Romney's newly announced running mate, Paul Ryan, has long subscribed to the objectivist philosophies of novelist Ayn Rand. Host Guy Raz speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about how that approach to public policy will play with voters.

5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Politics

What's In A Keynote? Making A Splash At Conventions

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

So now that we know who Mitt Romney's running mate is, what about the keynote speaker at the Republican Convention later this month? No word yet. Democrats have announced that San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro will get that coveted spot that has, in the past, served as a platform for bigger things.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

New GOP Team Brings Its Message To America

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

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2:36pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Books

Batman's Biggest Secret (No, It's Not Bruce Wayne)

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 4:41 pm

Bill Finger (left) helped create the Batman we know today, including his iconic costume, his tragic backstory, and many of his adversaries.
Ty Templeton

Batman has many secrets — the best-known one, of course, being his millionaire alter ego, Bruce Wayne. But that may not be the Dark Knight's biggest secret.

Since the 1930s, only one man has been given credit for creating the caped crusader and his home city of Gotham. Bob Kane's name appears in the credits of all the movies, the campy TV show and the associated merchandise, from video games and action figures to sheets and underwear.

But what if Bob Kane didn't do it all by himself?

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12:44pm

Sat August 11, 2012
A Blog Supreme

Branford Marsalis On Sensitive Musicians And The First Family Of Jazz

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:13 pm

Branford Marsalis spoke with NPR about modern jazz, his family, and his new album, Four MFs Playin' Tunes.
Courtesy of Marsalis Music.

Saxophonist Branford Marsalis, oldest son of New Orleans pianist and educator Ellis Marsalis, released an album with his quartet this week. He spoke to weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz about the failings of modern jazz, his hopes for the next generation and leaving New York City to move back to the South.

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8:58am

Sat August 11, 2012
The Salt

Summer Lobster Surplus Leads To Cross-Border Price War Between Trappers

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:38 am

Blockades set up by lobster trappers in Canada have disrupted Maine's lobster business.
Robert F Bukaty AP

You might imagine a war between lobster trappers to be something like this battle of the lobsters. OK, not really. Still, the price war heating up between the fishing folk in Maine and Canada this summer is bringing everybody down.

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5:27pm

Fri August 10, 2012
The Torch

Gaming The Games: The Rules That Got Bent In London

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 8:06 pm

Cameron van der Burgh of South Africa celebrates his gold medal in the men's 100m breaststroke. He later admitted that he took extra dolphin kicks during his swim, a violation of the rules.
Adam Pretty Getty Images

The London Summer Olympics are winding down, and by most accounts, the games have been a success. There were plenty of "thrill of victory, agony of defeat" moments; big, enthusiastic crowds — although there were too many blocks of empty seats; and for those who like a helping of scandal served up at their Olympics, there was that, too.

It wasn't the usual scourge of doping. Instead, the London Olympics had incidents of bending the rules and ethics of sport.

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5:05pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Politics and Government

Area congresswoman proposes tax law change

Central New York Congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle sponsored a bill in the House of Representatives that she hopes will close a tax loophole that benefits federal employees. The bill would make sure that retirement plans of federal workers are not taxed differently than those of private sector employees.  

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5:00pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Remembrances

David Rakoff Saw The World In All Its Dark Beauty

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 7:04 pm

David Rakoff, the author of Half Empty, Don't Get Too Comfortable and Fraud, was a frequent contributor to This American Life. He died Thursday at the age of 47.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

When writer David Rakoff died Thursday at the age 47, he was barely the age he said he was always "meant" to be. In his 2010 memoir, Half Empty, he wrote, "Everyone has an internal age, a time in life when one is, if not one's best, then at very least one's most authentic self. I always felt that my internal clock was calibrated somewhere between 47 and 53 years old."

Rakoff died in New York City after a long struggle with cancer — an ordeal that he wrote about with sobering honesty and biting wit.

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4:53pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Politics and Government

Richard Hanna on being a "moderate"

Central New York Representative Richard Hanna knows he comes down on the moderate side of his Republican colleagues in Congress.

Speaking this week during a visit to Central Square, which sits in the newly drawn 22nd congressional district he is running for re-election in, the first-term congressman talked about influences from his more conservative colleagues.

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4:41pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Education

New charter school proposed for Utica

A charter school in Syracuse is hoping to expand to another part of central New York. The school believes it can provide another option for children and parents.

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4:40pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Middle East

Sunni Cleric Rises To Challenge Hezbollah In Lebanon

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 9:45 am

Sheik Ahmad Assir speaks to supporters at a tent encampment set up in protest against Hezbollah in Sidon, Lebanon. He accuses the Islamist militant group of using resistance against Israel as a smokescreen for another aim: advancing Iranian regional hegemony.
Mohamad al-Baba NPR

On a recent day, baffled motorists honked their horns and veered around the blocked entrance to a major street in Sidon. Now Lebanon's third-largest city, Sidon was once a flourishing Phoenician city-state on the Mediterranean.

The street was closed off by Sunni cleric Sheik Ahmad Assir, who erected a small tent encampment in protest against the country's most powerful military and political force, the militant Islamist group Hezbollah.

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4:38pm

Fri August 10, 2012
U.S.

Puedes Believe It? Spanglish Gets In El Dictionary

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:47 pm

Spanglish, a mixture of English and Spanish, has been spoken for more than a century. A sign in Spanglish advertises a yard sale in Los Angeles in 2009.
Aurelio Jose Barrera Landov

The Royal Spanish Academy — the official arbiter of the Spanish language — recently announced that it will add the word "Espanglish" to the 2014 edition of its dictionary. This is a big deal for the traditionally conservative academy, and it's a big deal for supporters who feel that mix of Spanish and English has officially been ignored for more than a century.

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4:26pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Monkey See

Can NBC Get Its Fall Shows Into The Olympic Spotlight?

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:47 pm

Matthew Perry and Brett Gelman of NBC's Go On appear in a promo shot especially for the Olympics.
Justin Lubin NBC

With the Olympics drawing to a close, NBC is looking especially golden. They have had two weeks of great ratings — including record highs. What better time than on the eve of the network's new fall season to rack up two weeks of record audiences? But what might seem a slam dunk for the network is anything but.

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4:11pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Books News & Features

'Age Of Desire': How Wharton Lost Her 'Innocence'

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:47 pm

Edith Wharton moved to Paris in the early 1900s. Not long after, in 1913, after her affair with Morton Fullerton had ended, she divorced her husband of more than 20 years.
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

Jennie Fields was well into her new novel about Edith Wharton — and her love affair with a young journalist — when she heard that a new cache of Wharton letters had been discovered. They were written to Anna Bahlmann, who was first Wharton's governess and later her literary secretary. Bahlmann had never been considered a major influence on Wharton, but Fields had decided to make her a central character in her book, The Age of Desire, even before she heard about the letters.

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2:05pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Planet Money

How A Pasta Factory Got People To Show Up For Work

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 10:06 am

Robert Smith NPR

Zoe Chace and Robert Smith are reporting from European borders this week. This story is about the unofficial border within one country — the border that divides northern and southern Italy. This is the fourth story in a four-part series.

A decade ago, the Barilla pasta factory in Foggia, Italy, had a big problem with people skipping work. The absentee rate was around 10 percent.

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5:29pm

Thu August 9, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Trail, Even Republicans Spin Clinton Years Into Gold

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

What a difference 14 years makes. Here, Bill Clinton departs the White House on July 31, 1998, after telling reporters he wouldn't take questions about the Monica Lewinsky investigation.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

This week, the presidential campaign has been dominated by debate over the welfare law from the 1990s. It's just the latest example of how both sides are trying to use the Clinton years to their advantage — portraying them as a halcyon golden age.

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4:56pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Wish You Were Here: My Favorite Destination

Wish You Were Here: Listening To Loons In Maine

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

Hearing the call of the loons is like "a blessing."
Flickr

Writer Roxana Robinson's most recent novel, Cost, is set in Maine.

Mount Desert Island, off the coast of northern Maine, is known for dramatic scenery. Most of the island is Acadia National Park: steep forests, plunging down to a cobalt sea. Cadillac Mountain, the tallest peak, is the first place where light touches the American continent, each morning at dawn. Trails follow the windswept ridges; they wind along the smooth pink granite bluffs, rising from the deep, icy water, along the wild swirl of the great tides.

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4:40pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Regional Coverage

Kodak sells digital patents to pay off creditors

Kodak is selling 11,000 digital patents in a silent auction in Manhattan beginning today. The company is hoping to use the proceeds to pay off some of its creditors.

The Wall Street Journal reports technology giants Google and Apple are both bidding, but the initial offers are much lower than the estimated $2.6 billion Kodak says the patents are worth.

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4:30pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Politics and Government

Local congressman ventures guess in VP-stakes

Guessing who Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney might pick to be his running mate is one of the most popular parlor games among political wonks at the moment.

While many politicians won't venture to guess who the GOP vice presidential nominee will be, one central New York office holder was willing to make a prediction.

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4:22pm

Thu August 9, 2012
The Torch

Usain Bolt Cements His Place In History, Winning 200 Meter Gold

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

Usain Bolt of Jamaica crosses the finish line ahead of Yohan Blake of Jamaica to win gold during the Men's 200m Final.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Usain Bolt cemented his place as one of the greatest sprinters in history, when he won the 200 meter final today.

Bolt was challenged by his Jamaican teammate Yohan Blake, who closed in with less than 100 meters to go. Bolt kicked on his burners and ended up taking back the lead and beating Blake 19.32 to 19.44 seconds.

The big deal here is that this makes Bolt the first Olympian to win both the 100 meter and 200 meter races two Olympics in a row.

Warren Weir, another Jamaican, took third.

The AP adds:

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3:32pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea.
iStockphoto.com

There's some disturbing news out today about a disease we don't hear about much these days: gonorrhea. Federal health officials announced that the sexually transmitted infection is getting dangerously close to being untreatable.

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3:03pm

Thu August 9, 2012
The Torch

Women's Olympic Soccer Final: U.S. Beats Japan 2-1, To Win Gold

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:08 am

American Carli Lloyd heads in a goal in the first half to put the U.S. up 1-0 against Japan in the Olympic gold medal match.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

In Olympic women's soccer, the U.S. team has beaten Japan, 2-1, in the gold medal match at London's Wembley Stadium, a game that set a new attendance record with more than 80,000 spectators. Carli Lloyd scored both of the American goals, while U.S. stars Alex Morgan and Abby Wambach weren't able to finish their chances. But they were very active, and both players kept the Japanese defenders occupied around the goal.

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12:45pm

Thu August 9, 2012
Planet Money

The Marijuana Trade In The Euro's Birthplace

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 10:26 am

Marijuana in Maastricht
Ermindo Armino AP

Zoe Chace and Robert Smith are reporting from European borders this week. This is the second story in a four-part series.

Maastricht, a town in the Netherlands, is known largely for two things.

  1. The treaty that created the euro was signed there.
  2. Marijuana is legal there, and it's sold at "coffee shops" around town.

This is the story of the troubled relationship between those two claims to fame.

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6:15pm

Wed August 8, 2012
It's All Politics

In Brawl Over Romney's Tax Returns, Harry Reid Gets Marquee Billing

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 6:57 pm

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. speaks to the media at the Capitol in March.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's decision not to release more of his past tax returns has fueled countless attacks and counterattacks.

The former Massachusetts governor has released his 2010 tax return and promises that his 2011 return is forthcoming. He says that's enough.

But that's not enough for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. The result is an increasingly ugly fight.

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