All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Mark Lavonier
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6:00pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Books

A Comics Crusader Takes On The Digital Future

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:40 pm

Thrillbent.com. The site's creator, comic-book writer Mark Waid, hopes it will redefine comics in the era of smartphones and tablets." href="/post/comics-crusader-takes-digital-future" class="noexit lightbox">
A panel from part one of Insufferable, the first title offered by the comics website Thrillbent.com. The site's creator, comic-book writer Mark Waid, hopes it will redefine comics in the era of smartphones and tablets.
Courtesy of Thrillbent.com

He wouldn't make the claim himself, but when it comes to comic-book writers, Mark Waid is one of the greats.

"I've pretty much hit all of the pop culture bases," Waid says, surrounded by comic-book memorabilia in his Los Angeles home. Batman, Spider-Man and even The Incredibles have all had adventures dreamed up by Waid.

"Jan. 26, 1979, was the most important day of my life," Waid says. "Because that's the day that I saw Superman: The Movie. I came out of it knowing that no matter what the rest of my life was going to be like, it had to involve Superman somehow."

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4:48pm

Tue August 7, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Wu-Where? Opportunities Shift To China's New Cities

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 9:00 pm

Wuhan's newest attraction is Han Street, a shopping complex that stretches several football fields, features fancy faux European architecture, and is filled with stores featuring foreign brands from Dairy Queen to Zara.
Frank Langfitt NPR

China became a majority urban country this year. No nation has shifted so quickly from rural to urban than China, where more than half of the people now live in urban areas.

Everyone is familiar with megacities like Beijing and Shanghai, but they are just a tiny part of China's urbanization story. The country has more than 160 cities with populations of a million or more — places most of the world is only vaguely familiar with, if at all.

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4:27pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Would-Be Parents Wait As Foreign Adoptions Plunge

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 3:15 pm

Mike Cannata with 2-year-old Bella. Mike and his wife, Barb, brought Bella home from Bulgaria this past spring after spending five years attempting to adopt.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

When Barb and Mike Cannata adopted their first daughter from China almost a decade ago, the process was smooth and relatively quick — just 17 months from start to finish.

Now a chatty and confident 9-year-old, Emma is an accomplished equestrian with her show horse, Ajax. But the family had trouble explaining to Emma why it took so long to get her a little sister.

When the Cannatas decided to adopt again in 2007, Barb Cannata says, everything had changed. They ruled out China early on.

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4:09pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Destination Art

Stratford's Big Stars, From The Bard To The Bieb

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 6:00 pm

The Festival Theater in Stratford, Ontario, is the main venue for the town's annual Stratford Shakespeare Festival. The town lies on the Avon River — just like Shakespeare's British birthplace — and had schools named after Romeo and Juliet before the festival started in 1953.
Richard Bain Stratford Shakespeare Festival

Most theaters let audiences know the show is about to start by blinking the lights. Stratford's Festival Theater in Stratford, Ontario, is a bit more festive. Four burgundy-uniformed buglers and a drummer quicken the pace of hundreds of theatergoers who've been ambling up the hill from the banks of the Avon River. When curtain time arrives, a cannon will boom.

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4:04pm

Tue August 7, 2012
The Salt

Outsourced Croissants Outrage Traditional French Bakers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:07 am

A woman walks into Boulangerie Cauvet in Paris, where they still make croissants from scratch.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

There's always a line at the Boulangerie Cauvet on the corner of rue St. Charles in Paris's 15th district. In their family owned bakery, Esmeralda Cauvet and her husband Cyril sell around 800 croissants and 3,500 baguettes a day.

In the kitchen, head pastry maker Pierre Gibert still rolls his croissants from triangular strips of dough. "The key to a good croissant is good ingredients and a high quality dough. You have to knead it, let it rise and roll it a second time in butter. That's what gives a croissant its flaky quality," Gibert says.

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3:55pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Mom And Dad's Record Collection

Leonard Pitts On Memories Of Laundry And Nat King Cole

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 3:04 pm

Nat King Cole (center) rehearses with his trio at the London Palladium in 1950.
Ron Case Getty Images

The Mom and Dad's Record Collection series on All Things Considered continues with a memory of music and family from the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and author Leonard Pitts.

Pitts says his childhood mischief was set to the music of Nat King Cole, often courtesy of his mother's own voice. One afternoon, he remembers, she was singing "Don't Get Around Much Anymore" while he played out back.

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2:34pm

Tue August 7, 2012
The Record

Marvin Hamlisch, Movie And Broadway Composer, Has Died

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:22 pm

Marvin Hamlisch (left) with Liza Minnelli and Barry Manilow in 1987.
Time & Life Pictures Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

2:33pm

Tue August 7, 2012
Africa

Mali In Crisis Fractures Along Twin Fault Lines

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 6:10 pm

Militiaman from the Ansar Dine radical Islamic group ride on an armed vehicle between Gao and Kidal in northeastern Mali in June. Jihadists currently control the country's north.
Adama Diarra Reuters/Landov

A rebellion in northern Mali, followed by a military coup in the south, has shattered the veneer of stability in a country that was hailed for 20 years as a model democracy in turbulent West Africa.

Now Mali is facing twin crises, prompting regional and international fears that the north — currently controlled by jihadists — is a terrorist safe haven. And the politicians who are meant to be fixing the problems are bickering.

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12:57pm

Tue August 7, 2012
The Upstate Economy

Construction activity in Syracuse setting quick pace in 2012

A new Marriott hotel is going up in downtown Syracuse's Armory Square.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Economic development officials often joke that their favorite bird is the crane. Not the one with wings, mind you, but the kind you see on big construction sites.

So far in 2012, developers have put a fair number of cranes into the airspace above Syracuse. The city is seeing a big jump in the value of construction permits applied for.

Through May, $146,271,066 worth of permits have gone on the Division of Code Enforcement's books. That's more than full year totals for both 2009 ($136,534,880) and 2010 ($142,229,141). It is also well out-pacing 2011's numbers, when only about $30 million worth of construction had been applied for through May. Last year ended up finishing at $245,382,179.

That has people in city hall feeling positive about the city's economic outlook.

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6:17pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Environment

Are Recent Heat Waves A Result Of Climate Change?

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 6:51 pm

Cattle use a tree for shade as temperatures rose above 100 degrees in a pasture July 28, 2011, near Canadian, Texas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The last couple of years have certainly felt unusually hot in many parts of the U.S., but are they really all that unusual?

Many people wonder whether a warming climate is turning up the temperature or whether it's all just part of the normal variation in the weather. Among scientists, there's a growing view that these latest heat waves are indeed a result of climate change.

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5:47pm

Mon August 6, 2012
It's All Politics

For July, Romney Fundraising Outpaces Obama Yet Again

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 6:45 pm

Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign stop at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds this month in Golden, Colo.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

In July, the financial fortunes of the presidential candidates continued along their new trajectories, with Republican Mitt Romney's money-raising efforts outpacing President Obama once again.

Indeed, groups supporting Romney raised one-third more than Obama's re-election effort for the month.

Romney, the all-but-official Republican nominee, actually collected less in July than he had in June, but only slightly. His campaign announced Monday that its overall take for July was $101.3 million.

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5:47pm

Mon August 6, 2012
It's All Politics

Dressage Enthusiasts Find Romney-Driven Attention A Mixed Blessing

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 6:44 pm

Jan Ebeling rides Rafalca in the equestrian dressage competition at the 2012 Summer Olympics on Aug. 2. Rafalca is co-owned by Ann Romney, the wife of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Markus Schreiber AP

5:46pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Middle East

Security Breach Tests Egypt's New President

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 9:43 am

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi (shown here July 2) has said that he'll restore the country's security within his first 100 days in office.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

The bodies of 16 slain Egyptian soldiers are being prepared for burial, a day after 35 gunmen ambushed their border post in the Sinai Peninsula. The incident in northern Sinai is proving to be the biggest challenge for Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi since he assumed office about a month ago.

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5:19pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Space

Curiosity Is On Mars, Now What?

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 6:44 pm

Joe Palca describes the mood of NASA Mars scientists in the wake of the landing overnight, what the latest pictures and data are from the surface of the red planet and what mission scientists are going to do next with Curiosity.

4:34pm

Mon August 6, 2012
The Torch

Boxer Claressa Shields,17, Reaches Olympic Semifinal, Where A Medal Awaits

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 6:44 pm

U.S. boxer Claressa Shields is declared the winner on points over Anna Laurell of Sweden in the women's middleweight boxing quarterfinals at the 2012 London Olympic Games.
Jack Guez AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Olympic boxer Claressa Shields, the teenager whose dream of being in the first crop of Olympic women boxers led her to tell her story on All Things Considered back in February, will fight for a medal in London.

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4:34pm

Mon August 6, 2012
You Must Read This

An Apocalyptic Romp Through The 'Golden' State

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 6:44 pm

iStockphoto.com

Gabrielle Zevin's latest book is All These Things I've Done.

Forgive me, Facebook! I do not always want to tell people what I like. This flaw in my character puts me at odds with much of modern life, which is, of course, organized around a relentless cycle of recommendation.

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4:29pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Summer Nights: Funtown After Sundown

Cruisin' For Classic Cars On A Steamy Summer Night

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 7:00 am

Antique trucks, including a 1937 Plymouth, on display at the weekly Cruisin' on the Square car show in Milan, Ohio. Classic car owners and enthusiasts gather each Tuesday evening through the summer to show off their cars or even find one to buy.
Noah Adams NPR

At the heart of the small town of Milan, Ohio, there's a graceful and tree-lined town square. It makes a good gathering spot for the classic cars and trucks of decades past.

A 1923 T-Bucket Ford, a '77 Chevy El Camino, a '68 AMC AMX, a '46 Dodge truck, a '59 Ford Galaxie — they all keep arriving after 5 o'clock every Tuesday evening. As the owner-drivers park around the square, engine hoods go up, lawn chairs come out — and the admiration begins.

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4:10pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Politics and Government

Cuomo defends transparency record

Governor Andrew Cuomo defended his administration against criticisms that he has not been transparent enough, saying he’s trying to do more.

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4:06pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Regional Coverage

New York's record on economic development projects mixed

Governor Andrew Cuomo says New York’s track record on supporting economic development projects is hit and miss.

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5:55pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Space

Life On Mars? Try One Of Saturn's Moons Instead

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 6:46 pm

One of the things the Mars rover will look for is organic molecules that could at least indicate whether there was once life on the Red Planet. But if searching for life in outer space is the goal, many scientists now say we might have better luck elsewhere — specifically one of Saturn's moons, Enceladus.

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5:38pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Election 2012

Could 2012 Be The Year Of The Asian Voter?

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 5:33 pm

Mitt Romney and Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell were featured on the front page of a Chinese-language newspaper following a visit to the Northern Virginia's Asian-American community in June. Such engagements with the Asian community helped McDonnell win his current office.
Courtesy of Peter Su

5:10pm

Sun August 5, 2012
NPR Story

7 Dead In Shooting At Sikh Temple

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 6:46 pm

A shooting at a Sikh Temple in a suburb of Milwaukee has left seven people dead, including a suspect, officials say. A police officer is among the wounded. Latoya Dennis, a reporter for member station Milwaukee Public Radio, reports from Oak Creek, Wis.

4:33pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Space

Waiting For A Sign: Mars Rover To Land On Its Own

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 11:49 pm

An artist's concept of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft depicts the final minute before the rover, Curiosity, touches down on the surface of Mars.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

3:30pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Headbanging Bruckner And Debussy In Black And White: New Classical Albums

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 5:14 pm

The young pianist Inon Barnatan plays Debussy and Ravel with striking assurance.
Avie Records

Some people are intimidated by the vastness of classical music. And while the prospect of more than 1,000 years of hits to consider may be daunting, just think instead of how many musical journeys of discovery can be made.

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2:08pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Jay Chandrasekhar's 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 6:46 pm

Harry Shearer (left), Christopher Guest (center) and Michael McKean play the British band Spinal Tap, created for Rob Reiner's 1984 mock rockumentary This Is Spinal Tap.
MGM Home Entertainment AP

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For writer-director Jay Chandrasekhar, whose credits include Super Troopers, Beerfest and The Babymakers, which opened in theaters this weekend, the movie he could watch a million times is Rob Reiner's This Is Spinal Tap. "The accents are flawless, the music is really good," Chandrasekhar says.

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1:53pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Author Interviews

A Story Of Ancient Power In 'The Rise of Rome'

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:11 pm

Over the past decade, there's been a revival in popular histories of ancient Rome; not the academic tomes once reserved for specialists and students, but books and movies designed for the rest of us.

Anthony Everitt has written three biographies about some of the major players in ancient Rome: Cicero, Augustus and Hadrian, all full of intrigue and treachery.

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6:06pm

Sat August 4, 2012
Around the Nation

How America's Losing The War On Poverty

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 1:53 pm

Members of the Dolan family walk home with bags of food from the Southern Tier Mobile Food Pantry in Oswego, N.Y., in June. Food banks across the nation are reporting giant spikes in demand.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

While President Obama and Gov. Romney battle for the hearts and minds of the middle class this election season, there's a huge swath of Americans that are largely ignored. It's the poor, and their ranks are growing.

According to a recent survey by The Associated Press, the number of Americans living at or below the poverty line will reach its highest point since President Johnson made his famous declaration of war on poverty in 1964.

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4:52pm

Sat August 4, 2012
Author Interviews

The Thomas Eagleton Affair Haunts Candidates Today

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 12:51 pm

Sens. Thomas Eagleton (left) and George McGovern celebrate their candidacy for vice president and president, respectively, at the Democratic National Convention in 1972.
AP

Sometime before the end of the month, when Republicans hold their convention in Tampa, Fla., Mitt Romney will announce his vice presidential running mate.

There's a good chance the finalists for that spot are wading through mountains of paperwork, and answering deeply personal questions about finances, past statements, friendships — and medical history.

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4:52pm

Sat August 4, 2012
NPR Story

Week In News: Presidential Race

Originally published on Sat August 4, 2012 6:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: He tried. You tried. It's OK to make a change.

RAZ: Part of a TV ad paid for by the Republican National Committee co-opting the theme of change from Barack Obama's 2008 campaign and using it against him. James Fallows of The Atlantic joins us now as he does most Saturdays. Hello, Jim.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Guy.

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4:52pm

Sat August 4, 2012
NPR Story

Phelps Picks Up Gold In 'Final' Race Of His Career

Originally published on Sat August 4, 2012 6:30 pm

Michael Phelps swam what he says was his last Olympic race: the men's 4x100 medley relay. NPR's Howard Berkes, who was in London, tells host Guy Raz about the race.

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