All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

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4:03pm

Fri July 27, 2012
Planet Money

Losing With LIBOR: One Trader's Story

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 6:02 pm

London-based Barclays Bank agreed to pay a $453 million fine over charges it manipulated the London Interbank Offered Rate — LIBOR — a key global interest rate.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

We've been talking a lot lately about what's been dubbed the "LIBOR rate fixing scandal," where some of the biggest banks in the world have been accused of manipulating a key global interest rate.

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2:04pm

Fri July 27, 2012
The Two-Way

One White Buffalo To Get Sacred Name; Death Of Another Still Stirs Anger

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 6:02 pm

The little guy in Connecticut. Saturday, he gets his sacred naming ceremony.
Courtesy of Peter Fay

9:54am

Fri July 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Stories Of The Colorado Victims: Young Artist Was 'Ball Of Joy'

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 6:02 pm

Alexander "AJ" Boik in an undated photo provided by his family.
AFP/Getty Images

As they're told, we're pointing to some of the stories about the 12 people who died and the 58 who were wounded when a gunman opened fire on July 20 at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. Click here to see more. As you see others, please share the links in the comment threads.

-- "AJ" Boik, Wanted Everyone To Be Happy:

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6:25pm

Thu July 26, 2012
The Veepstakes

For VP Option, Christie's Star May Burn Too Bright

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 6:52 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie greets Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Des Moines, Iowa, on Dec. 30, 2011.
Evan Vucci AP

What people in New Jersey like about Gov. Chris Christie is his candor — the sense that he's speaking from his heart, instead of a script.

Last summer, as Hurricane Irene barreled toward the Jersey shore, the Republican governor offered a particularly memorable moment during a press conference: "Get the hell off the beach in Asbury Park and get out," he said. "You're done. It's 4:30. You've maximized your tan. Get off the beach."

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6:24pm

Thu July 26, 2012
World

Latest Target For Palestinians' Protest? Their Leader

Originally published on Sun July 29, 2012 9:20 am

Abbas attends a meeting of his Fatah movement at its headquarters in Ramallah on Jan. 29.
Atef Safadi EPA/Landov

The Kalandia checkpoint between Jerusalem and Ramallah in the West Bank is best known as a flashpoint between Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces. Images of masked youths throwing rocks by the painted concrete wall here are ubiquitous.

Protesters gathered at Kalandia again last week, but their focus wasn't Israeli soldiers: It was Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

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4:46pm

Thu July 26, 2012
Election 2012

Romney Aims Tough Talk At China, And Obama

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks during the national convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Reno, Nev., on Tuesday. In the speech, Romney attacked the Obama administration's approach to China.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

President Obama's national security adviser visited China this week, just as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was attacking the administration's approach to that country.

"The cheating must finally be brought to a stop," Romney said Tuesday in a speech to the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Reno, Nev. "The president hasn't done it and won't do it, and I will."

China is the world's largest economy after the United States. It is one of the most important — and complicated — foreign relationships the U.S. has.

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4:32pm

Thu July 26, 2012
Regional Coverage

Nationwide police action targets synthetic drug makers, sellers; Watertown, Syracuse shops raided

A first-ever nationwide raid on the synthetic drug industry was conducted yesterday, and hit stores in Watertown, Syracuse and around the area. The raid follows a new federal law that bans many of the chemical compounds used to make synthetic drugs like bath salts.

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4:04pm

Thu July 26, 2012
Technology

Buffalo's roster of incubators grows by one

Z80 Labs, Buffalo's first "Internet-focused" incubator, is named as an homage to the 1970's microprocessor. The chip helped form the foundation of the Z80 founders' early tech work.
G.G. Italy Flickr

Buffalo’s latest business incubator is on the hunt for small tech companies who are long on ideas, but perhaps short on cash, office space and personnel. 

Calling itself Buffalo’s first Internet-focused incubator, Z80 Labs launched Monday with a well-orchestrated launch party featuring the region’s tech elite, as well as Forbes CEO Mike Perlis, and prominent venture capitalist Fred Wilson.

Z80 is the brainchild of some of Buffalo’s richest entrepreneurs who are promising to use their business connections and access to capital to nurture hand-selected startups.

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3:48pm

Thu July 26, 2012
Monkey See

It Was All A Dream (Or: Turns Out Spoilers Are Good For You)

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Chances are, if you're a regular reader of this blog you've read (or perhaps even posted) an incredibly vitriolic comment or two accusing the writer of the despicable crime of spoilers.

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3:16pm

Thu July 26, 2012
Mom And Dad's Record Collection

From Scorn For Zevon, A Father-Daughter Moment Is Born

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 6:51 pm

Warren Zevon on the cover of Excitable Boy, the 1978 album which includes "Werewolves in London."
Courtesy of the artist

3:06pm

Thu July 26, 2012
The Torch

In Kayla Harrison, U.S. Has Chance For Judo Gold, And A 'Comeback Kid' Story

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 10:10 pm

Kayla Harrison, who is on the U.S. judo team, is going to the Olympics for the first time.
Melanie Stetson Freeman Christian Science Monitor/Getty Images

9:52am

Thu July 26, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

A Know-It-All's Guide To Olympic Music

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Among all things official at the Olympics, like the flag, is music composed for the opening and closing ceremonies.
Tony Duffy Getty Images

5:49pm

Wed July 25, 2012
Money & Politics

Part Of Romney's Foreign Itinerary: Raising Money

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 7:29 pm

A campaign sticker for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is seen on a sign for Romney Street in London on Wednesday, as Romney arrived to meet with leaders, hold fundraisers and attend the opening of the Olympics.
Charles Dharapak AP

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is on a weeklong trip in which he's scheduled to meet with three prime ministers, give two speeches and attend the opening ceremonies of the London Olympics. On a more practical level, he'll also raise some campaign cash.

This trip is designed to highlight how Romney would fix the failings he sees in President Obama's foreign policy.

Romney opened his attack Tuesday while still in the U.S. In an address to the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Reno, Nev., he lit into the Obama administration's relationship with Israel.

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5:28pm

Wed July 25, 2012
Election 2012

Black Business Owners Urge Obama To Aid Growth

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 7:29 pm

Then-presidential candidate Barack Obama poses with National Urban League President Marc Morial on Aug. 2, 2008.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

President Obama's speech to the National Urban League conference in New Orleans on Wednesday night coincides with a debate over the role of government in helping small businesses succeed.

Some black Americans say they have an especially hard time when it comes to owning and operating their own businesses.

On the northern edge of New Orleans' French Quarter, Shaka Zulu and his wife, Na'imah, are trying desperately to protect a slice of local culture that sometimes gets lost here.

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5:26pm

Wed July 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Gov. Brown Unveils New Water Tunnel Plans For California

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 7:29 pm

Gov. Jerry Brown waits for the start of a news conference to announce plans to build a giant twin tunnel system to move water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to farmland and cities.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Calif. Gov. Jerry Brown and U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced a new $23.7 billion proposal that would build a twin tunnel system to carry water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta over to the southern part of the state.

Water in Southern California has become an intractable problem. The frustration was evident at the press conference, when Brown dropped a four-letter expletive.

The Sacramento Bee reports:

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4:58pm

Wed July 25, 2012
Music Interviews

The Practical Side Of The Great American Jam Band

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 7:29 pm

The Grateful Dead circa 1970. The band's members were quintessential rock hippies — but, a new exhibit reveals, savvy businessmen as well.
Gems Redferns

The Grateful Dead's eponymous live album started it all for Nicholas Meriwether.

It was 1985. He was studying history at Princeton and got hooked by psychedelic jams like "Wharf Rat." After his first concert, he knew: "I will spend the rest of my life thinking and studying this."

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4:09pm

Wed July 25, 2012
Regional Coverage

Dry weather means fewer mosquitos in central New York

Though the dry weather is causing hardships for some, there is at least one benefit -- mosquito populations are down in central New York.

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3:58pm

Wed July 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

As Pain Pills Change, Abusers Move To New Drugs

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 7:29 pm

Opana is the latest painkiller that's become popular with drug abusers.
Thomas Walker Flickr

To the uninitiated, Austin, Ind., doesn't look like a town under siege.

In the maze of back roads off the city's main drag, the houses are close together. Some look rundown; others are well-kept.

For Jeremy Stevens, these are his former drug haunts. Steven says many of the homes are inhabited by people who abuse and deal prescription painkillers.

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3:52pm

Wed July 25, 2012
The Salt

New Pizza Museum Offers A Slice Of American Food And Culture

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:23 am

Brian Dwyer owns the world's largest collection of pizza-related items. He plans to display some of his memorabilia, including pizza-themed music records, in a new museum-restaurant in Philadelphia.
Kimberly Paynter for NPR

Many foods have their own dedicated museums — like burnt food and mustard — so why not pizza? That's what Brian Dwyer, the owner of the world's largest collection of pizza memorabilia, has wondered for a long time.

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3:42pm

Wed July 25, 2012
Movie Interviews

For Ai Weiwei, Politics And Arts Always Mix

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 8:49 pm

The famous Chinese artist Ai Weiwei is also a prominent dissident in his home country. His political side is the focus of Alison Klayman's documentary Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry.
Ted Alcorn IFC Films

Last week, a Chinese court rejected artist Ai Weiwei's lawsuit against the tax bureau that had imposed a massive fine on his company. Ai was fined more than $2 million after being detained for three months last year.

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7:24pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Business

Ford's Little Engine That Could Challenge Hybrids

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 9:37 am

The 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show in Germany featured Ford Motor Co.'s new three-cylinder EcoBoost engine, which will hit the U.S. market next year.
Courtesy of Ford Motor Co.

Ford Motor Co. intends to prove that good things come in small packages — really small packages. The company has taken engine downsizing to a new level with its new three-cylinder EcoBoost engine, which has been introduced in Europe and is set to hit the U.S. market next year.

The EcoBoost offers more power than many conventional four-cylinder engines, with fuel economy numbers a hybrid could envy. Early fans are calling it a modern "little engine that could," and Ford is betting that American customers are ready to embrace a three-cylinder engine.

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6:19pm

Tue July 24, 2012
U.S.

Offshore Jobs Play Role In Campaigns And Economy

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 5:46 pm

President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney have been trading attacks over the issue of American jobs being moved overseas.

The president has pounded Romney for the investments made by his former firm Bain Capital in the 1990s. Not to be outdone, the Romney campaign has suggested most of the money from the president's stimulus program went to create jobs overseas.

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6:19pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Black Teens Are Getting The Message On HIV, But Risks Are Still There

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 7:01 pm

Condom use has dropped among black youth, even as teens engage in less risky sexual behavior overall.
Mike Segar Reuters/Landov

The HIV epidemic among African-Americans is getting deserved new attention at the 19th International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C. And the news isn't all bad.

New data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that black high school students are engaging in risky sexual behavior far less often than they were 20 years ago.

Since black teens are the future of the epidemic for the hardest-hit ethnic group, this is encouraging.

Here are the main results:

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5:52pm

Tue July 24, 2012
It's All Politics

Are Candidates Missing The Big Picture?

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 6:31 pm

President Obama speaks at the Fox Theater in Oakland, Calif., on Monday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

If the stakes could not be bigger, why are the presidential candidates running such insubstantial campaigns?

On any given day, it seems like the debate is about whether President Obama thinks entrepreneurs built their own businesses or what year Mitt Romney gave up control of Bain Capital — instead of big solutions to fundamental problems like economic growth, energy or immigration.

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5:47pm

Tue July 24, 2012
All Tech Considered

Want Free Wi-Fi In New York? Get Near A Pay Phone

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 1:26 pm

A phone booth serves as a free Wi-Fi hot spot in New York City's Columbus Circle.
Anna Solo

Mark Thomas is using a pay phone, but he isn't paying. And physically, he's not even that close to the phone.

He's sitting on a bench on the street in Astoria, Queens, checking email on his netbook. It's grabbing an Internet signal from a military-grade antenna on top of a pay phone down the block.

"It's not the speediest but you can't complain about free, right?" Thomas says.

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4:25pm

Tue July 24, 2012
AIDS: A Turning Point

D.C.'s Black Churches Take Steps In AIDS Fight

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 10:11 am

As thousands gather in Washington, D.C., for the International AIDS Conference, the city is battling disturbing levels of HIV/AIDS, particularly in the black community.

According to the D.C. Department of Health, 4.3 percent of the black population in the city is living with the disease, and some advocates argue that black churches should be doing more to fight it.

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4:20pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Education

Senator Gillibrand backs uniform paperwork for college applicants

As the rising debt of recent college graduates becomes a focus of families across the country, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) is trying to clarify the cost of higher education.

Gillibrand announced today that she is supporting new uniformed financial aid forms released by the Department of Education. She says a greater understanding of costs will help families plan better for college.

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4:15pm

Tue July 24, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

A City Faces Its 'Berlin Wall': An Interstate Highway

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 12:25 pm

A sign for Interstate 81 sits under an overpass in Syracuse, N.Y. City officials and residents are debating what to do about an aging stretch of the highway that cuts through the city.
Zack Seward for NPR

Interstate 81 runs through the heart of Syracuse, N.Y., where a 1.4-mile-long elevated stretch of the highway is known locally as "the viaduct." Like many road projects built in the middle of the last century, I-81 is bumping up against the end of its life span. While officials say it's still safe to drive on, the highway is crumbling in parts.

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4:08pm

Tue July 24, 2012
World

Whistleblower Law Unlikely To Help Italy's Migrants

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 6:19 pm

African migrants fired from Italian factories in the north have joined the swelling ranks of people searching for agriculture work in the south. Originally from Burkina Faso, Karim Suruku (right) is a migrant worker in Calabria in southern Italy. At left is Amidou Denamidou.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Italy recently approved a decree that would grant work and residence permits to migrants who blow the whistle on bosses who exploit them in the economy illegally.

But in places like the southern region of Calabria, the law has little chance of being applied at a time when the economic crisis increasingly fosters an illegal, underground economy.

The main activity in Calabria is agriculture. Thanks to vast citrus fields, it's one of the major stops for migratory workers, mostly Africans without legal documents.

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5:49pm

Mon July 23, 2012
The Torch

Two Very Different Cyclists Steer The Way From Idaho To London Olympics

Kristin Armstrong has been reporting to this stretch of highway outside Boise, Idaho, nearly every week to train in the time trial.
Sadie Babits Boise State Public Radio

Two American women cyclists from Idaho will race at this summer's Olympics. And their events couldn't be more different: Kristin Armstrong races the clock, wearing an aerodynamic teardrop helmet in the time trial.

Meanwhile, mountain biker Georgia Gould combines speed with technical prowess to navigate rocky descents and dirt trails.

Training In The Desert

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