All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Pages

5:35pm

Tue June 12, 2012
It's All Politics

Justice Department Sues Florida As Voter Battle Intensifies

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:02 pm

A Republican primary voter walks to her polling precinct in January in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Justice sued Florida on Tuesday to stop it from trying to remove noncitizens from its voter registration rolls.

The department says the way the state is going about doing this violates federal law. Florida says it's partly the federal government's fault for not sharing citizenship data with the state.

It's all part of the escalating battle between the Obama administration and Republican-led states over voting laws.

Read more

5:03pm

Tue June 12, 2012
The Record

Diplo: Building A Bridge From The Underground To The Mainstream

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:41 pm

The DJ and producer Diplo, who also records as Major Lazer, has produced songs for M.I.A., Beyonce and Usher.
Jordan Strauss Getty Images

The music made by Thomas Wesley Pentz, better known by his stage name, Diplo, is one part club-music mashup and one part pop music forecast. In 2009, he took bubblin' — a syncopated house style born in the clubs of Holland — as inspiration and collaborated with fellow DJ Switch, his partner in the group Major Lazer, to make the dance-floor hit "Pon de Floor." But he wasn't done with the bubblin' sound yet. In 2011, he used that song as basis for "Run the World (Girls)," a single by the pop star Beyonce.

Read more

4:13pm

Tue June 12, 2012
The Impact of War

To Rehabilitate Young Vets, Go Hunting

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:02 pm

Jake Dobberke, 26, a Marine who lost his legs in Afghanistan, watches for turkeys in Potter County, Pa. The LEEK Hunting and Mountain Preserve helps healing young vets explore the wilderness in adaptive hunting gear.
Jenelle Pifer WESA

Recreational rehabilitation programs have long been a favorite for helping disabled veterans acclimate after war, and the number of young and disabled vets returning who need those services is on the rise.

Two brothers — with nearly 60 years of military service between them — are trying to help with a unique retreat that's free for young vets. The program gets them out of their hospital beds for a few days to hunt in rural Pennsylvania.

Read more

3:54pm

Tue June 12, 2012
Asia

A Nobel Acceptance Speech — Two Decades Overdue

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 10:49 pm

Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi is heading to Europe for the first time in more than two decades and will be giving a series of high-profile speeches She's shown here on June 2 meeting with Myanmarese refugees who are living in camps in Thailand.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Aung San Suu Kyi heads to Europe Wednesday, where she'll deliver a speech she was invited to give more than two decades ago: the one for her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, which she was unable to collect while under house arrest.

In Myanmar's largest city, Yangon, at the headquarters of Suu Kyi's party, spokesman U Nyan Win says she is busy writing speeches for her extended trip to Europe, including the visit to Oslo for the belated Nobel address this weekend.

Read more

2:32pm

Tue June 12, 2012
Regional Coverage

Repatriation: Wampum beads return to the Onondaga Nation

Ellen Abbott WRVO

 Some sacred and cultural objects of the Onondaga Nation and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy are back where they belong, after languishing for years in the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse.  

Read more

12:41pm

Tue June 12, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Panel Questions Benefits Of Vitamin D Supplements

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 8:35 am

A woman pours two tablets into her hand from a pill bottle.
iStockphoto.com

An influential panel of experts questioned two big reasons people take vitamin D supplements.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded in draft recommendations released Tuesday that taking less than 400 international units of vitamin D and 1,000 milligrams of calcium every day doesn't reduce the risk for bone fractures among postmenopausal women. And so the task force recommended against doing that.

Read more

5:27pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Election 2012

Arizona Voters Choosing Gabby Giffords' Replacement

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Democrat Ron Barber (left) and Republican Jesse Kelly during a May 23 debate in Tucson. They are running Tuesday in a special election to replace retired Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
Kelly Presnell Arizona Daily Star

Voters in southeastern Arizona go to the polls Tuesday in a special election to fill the rest of the congressional term of former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.

Giffords, a Democrat, resigned in January, a year after she was critically wounded in a shooting rampage. Running to fill the remaining six months of her term are her former aide, Ron Barber, and Republican Jesse Kelly, a businessman and Iraq War veteran.

The special election has echoes of the 2010 congressional campaign in the Tucson-based 8th Congressional District.

Read more

5:27pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Middle East

Lebanese Fear Spillover Violence From Syria

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Syria's turmoil has been spreading into Lebanon, where residents say Syrian soldiers have crossed the border and killed civilians. Here, Lebanese army soldiers patrol in the northern port city of Tripoli, Lebanon, earlier this month, where clashes broke out between pro- and anti-Syria gunmen.
Bilal Hussein AP

A rash of kidnappings in Lebanon over the weekend, coupled with deadly cross-border attacks by the Syrian army, are all worrying signs that Syria's troubles are continuing to spill over into its smaller and weaker neighbor.

In the most recent incidents, a Sunni sheik known to support the Syrian uprising was abducted. In retaliation, several Alawites aligned with the Syrian government were taken. Days before that, the Syrian army shot several people on Lebanese territory.

Read more

4:45pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Music Reviews

Sidi Touré And The Sonic Heritage Of The Sahara

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 1:42 pm

Sidi Touré plays guitar and sings in the Songhaï tradition.
Jonathan Crawford

It's easy to romanticize the Sahara — a vast expanse of sand organized around the northern reaches of the Niger River. Part of that romance is captured in the music of singer and guitarist Sidi Touré, who composes songs in the folkloric tradition of the Songhaï people.

His new album of desert chamber music, Koïma, harkens back to the glory days of the Songhaï Empire, which ruled much of the region from the city of Gao in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Read more

4:44pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Europe

Spain's Leader Calls It A 'Victory,' Not A Bailout

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Protesters rally against a bailout package for Spain in front of a Bank of Spain building in Barcelona on Monday. The demonstrators think the bailout will bring only greater hardship.
Josep Lago AFP/Getty Images

A day after getting approval for a financial rescue he vowed Spain would never need, Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said it was his idea all along.

"No one pressured me into this. I pushed for it myself, because I wanted a line of credit," Rajoy said. He refused to call it a "bailout." He called it a "victory" instead.

Most Spaniards don't buy that. In a poll published Sunday, 78 percent of respondents said they have "little or no" faith in Rajoy and his ruling conservatives. That's just six months after they won elections in a landslide.

Read more

4:11pm

Mon June 11, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama, Romney Campaigns Taking 'See What Sticks' Approach To Web Videos

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

2:50pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Regional Coverage

Students remain unprepared even though graduation rates are on the rise

Rob Kleine Flickr

New York state's overall high school graduation rate continues to rise slowly over time. But one-quarter of students statewide don’t graduate high school after four years. These statistics are according to the New York State Education Department’s release of high school graduation rates for 2011.

Read more

10:08am

Mon June 11, 2012
Regional Coverage

Balloons fly high over central New York

Matt Johnston/WRVO

The annual Jamesville Balloonfest held this weekend was packed to the brim with family-friendly entertainment, while organizers kept a watchful eye on the weather.

Read more

5:05pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Politics

Future Of Health Care Law Hangs In Balance

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:01 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

At some point this month, maybe next week, maybe even tomorrow, the Supreme Court will decide whether all or parts of the Affordable Care Act, the health care law backed by the White House, is constitutional or not. And for that reason, a man in Oregon named Rocky King isn't sleeping very well. Have you slept in the past two years?

ROCKY KING: Three times.

RAZ: Three times in the past two years.

Read more

5:05pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Interviews

Assessing Obama's Team Of Rivals

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:01 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Back in 2008, shortly before Barack Obama became President Obama, he told a reporter that an Obama Cabinet would be a team of rivals, smart people with different viewpoints who would, in Mr. Obama's words, push him out of his comfort zone.

Read more

5:05pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Interviews

Bond Donned A Suit, A Stylish Suit

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:01 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, you're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. Fifty years ago, a film franchise ushered in a new era of action, adventure, and of course, style.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RAZ: James Bond. Men wanted to look like him, and women also wanted men to look like him.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "DR. NO")

SEAN CONNERY: (as James Bond) Am I properly dressed for the occasion?

YVONNE SHIMA: (as Sister Lily) Quite suitable.

Read more

12:03pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Music Interviews

Fiona Apple: 'I Don't Really Have A Plan'

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:43 pm

Known for brevity's sake as The Idler Wheel..., Fiona Apple's new album is her first in seven years.
Dan Monick

It's been seven years since Fiona Apple has released a new album. The singer-songwriter, who broke out in 1996 with Tidal, says the delay is a quirk of her creative process.

Read more

4:51pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Politics

Accusations, Investigation Follow Intelligence Leaks

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 6:35 pm

The Justice Department has launched an investigation to determine the source of a series of leaks about sensitive intelligence matters. President Obama denied his administration authorized the leaks, but some Senate Republicans accused the White House of deliberately leaking the stories in order to boost the president's national security credentials.

4:51pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Politics

Could 'Taxmageddon' Crisis Create Compromise?

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 6:35 pm

On Jan. 1, trillions of dollars in spending cuts and tax increases — called Taxmageddon — will take effect unless Congress and the White House can agree on a new plan. Many economists say the country will fall back into a recession if it happens. Former Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin says Congress may actually be "forced to make a decision that affects taxes and spending."

4:51pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Middle East

Free Syrian Army Linked To Damascus Gunfire, Explosions

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 6:35 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Support for Syria's president, Bashar al-Assad, may be further deteriorating. That's after Russia's foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, said his country would be glad to see Assad step down if most Syrians agreed. Russia's been one of the Syrian regime's staunchest supporters.

In Syria itself, another night of gunfire and explosions, some of it in the capital, Damascus. NPR's Deborah Amos is there and with me now.

Read more

4:13pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Author Interviews

Steve Guttenberg Writes His Own 'Bible'

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:41 pm

Steve Guttenberg (left), Michael Winslow (center) and G.W. Bailey star in 1987's Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol, part of the film franchise launched by 1984's Police Academy.
Warner Bros./Getty Images

When Steve Guttenberg was 16, he went to see an agent about starting his acting career.

That agent told him: "You are the last guy I would pick to be a movie star."

Guttenberg decided to become an actor anyway.

The summer before he was supposed to start the University of Albany, he moved from Long Island to Los Angeles to try his luck. Once there, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he snuck onto the Paramount Studios lot, set up his own office, and started making phone calls to agents and producers.

Read more

1:31pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Jared Harris Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 1:28 pm

Dustin Hoffman in Sydney Pollack's 1982 film, Tootsie.
Columbia / The Kobal Collection Columbia

The Weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Jared Harris, whose credits include The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, and AMC's TV drama Mad Men, the movie he can't get enough of is Sydney Pollack's Tootsie. "It's just so brilliant," says Harris.

Read more

12:03pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Music Interviews

'Call Me Maybe': Behind The Song Of The Summer

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 11:57 am

Carly Rae Jepsen is the 26-year-old singer behind the inescapable pop hit "Call Me Maybe."
Courtesy of the artist

6:14pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Middle East

In A Syrian Village, Evidence Of A Slaughter

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 10:03 pm

Anti-government protesters in the northern Syrian village of Hass protest on Thursday following the deaths of dozens of civilians a day earlier in the village of Mazraat al-Qubair. The banner reads, "The al-Qubair massacre challenges the world's humanity."
Edlib News Network AP

NPR correspondent Deborah Amos joined U.N. monitors and a small group of journalists Friday who were able to enter the Syrian village of Mazraat al-Qubair, where 78 people, including women and children, were killed on Wednesday by pro-government forces, according to opposition activists.

Read more

4:45pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Around the Nation

Disastrous S.D. Flood Caused National Wake Up Call

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 9:57 pm

The 1972 flood in Rapid City, S.D., killed 238 people and destroyed more than 1,300 homes. The city responded by establishing a no-build zone in the flood plain. Other cities across the country adopted similar policies after the disaster.
Courtesy of Minnelusa Historical Association, Journey Museum

Survivors say the wall of water was like a tsunami that destroyed nearly everything in its path as it roared through a Black Hills canyon and into town. The flash flood that hit Rapid City, S.D., on June 9, 1972, was one of the worst floods in U.S. history. It killed 238 people and damaged or washed away more than 1,300 homes.

On Saturday, the city will read the names of those who died and reflect on how the flood changed the way the city and others towns across the country built themselves.

'It Was Hell'

Read more

4:03pm

Fri June 8, 2012
The Salt

Food Truck Cookbook Tracks Best Meals Served On Wheels

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

The crew of Shindigs sets up shop in a parking lot in Birmingham.
Debbie Elliott NPR

With recent news that even Paris has one, food trucks are certainly in vogue these days. In the U.S., they're now spreading from the hot scenes in Los Angeles and New York to smaller cities, like Milwaukee and Madison. Even school systems are jumping on the food truck bandwagon.

Read more

3:47pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Latin America

Mexicans Want New Approach To Bloody Drug War

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

A Mexican federal policeman guards the area where dozens of bodies, some of them mutilated, were found on a highway outside the northern Mexican city of Monterrey on May 13. The murders were one of the latest episodes in Mexico's brutal and unrelenting drug war.
Christian Palma AP

Second of two parts

Mexicans select a new president on July 1, and they want a leader who can reduce the rampant violence in their country. Warring drug cartels have killed more than 50,000 people in the past 5 1/2 years, while thousands have disappeared and some cities have been turned into lawless zones.

Read more

3:17pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Science

Is Japanese Dock A Noah's Ark Or A Trojan Horse?

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

Among the creatures that survived the trans-Pacific trek aboard the Japanese dock was this sea star, which was found inside the float.
Jessica Miller flickr

A bizarre event has drawn scientists to a beach in Oregon — a floating concrete dock from Japan has washed ashore. It had been ripped from its moorings by last year's tsunami and floated across the Pacific.

The dock is encrusted with mussels, barnacles and other marine life from Asia. Scientists are amazed these organisms survived the 14-month voyage, but they're also worried some of these organisms could become pests in U.S. waters.

Read more

7:03am

Fri June 8, 2012
Book Reviews

Right On The Money: A 'Capital' Book For Our Times

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

iStockphoto.com

Lizzie Skurnick writes the "That Should Be a Word" column for the New York Times Magazine.

England has always reveled in its drawing-room dramas, from Jane Austen's social minefields to E.M. Forster's Howards End to Upstairs, Downstairs — and yes, the blockbuster Downton Abbey.

Read more

5:54pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Music Reviews

Music Review: 'Can You Canoe'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

For many kids, summer means no homework, playing outdoors and, of course, traveling. Our children's music reviewer, Stefan Shepherd, tells us about a new album inspired by a trip down America's original interstate highway.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CAN YOU CANOE?")

Read more

Pages