All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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7:35pm

Thu May 24, 2012
Law

Suspect Arrested In Etan Patz Kidnapping Case

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In New York City, a decades old missing child case may have been solved. In 1979, a 6-year-old boy named Etan Patz disappeared as he was walking to school. Thirty-three years later, almost to the day, police say they have a suspect under arrest and his confession. That suspect is Pedro Hernandez, now 51 years old.

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5:37pm

Thu May 24, 2012
All Tech Considered

Friend Your Students? New York City Schools Say No

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

New York City's Department of Education issued its first guidelines this spring for how teachers should navigate social media.
Facebook

English teacher Eleanor Terry started a Facebook page last fall for the High School for Telecommunication Arts and Technology in Brooklyn. She uses it for the school's college office to remind seniors about things like application deadlines. The seniors use it to stay in touch with each other.

"There was a student who got into the University of Chicago," she says, "and the way we found out about it was that they scanned their acceptance letter and then tagged us in it."

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5:25pm

Thu May 24, 2012
Election 2012

N.C. Democrats Try To Dust Off Pre-Convention Blues

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 10:14 am

The audience listens as President Obama speaks about student loans at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill last month.
Larry Downing Reuters /Landov

The Democratic Party will hold its national convention in Charlotte this September. The choice of venue was a signal that North Carolina would be a key part of President Obama's re-election strategy.

But the state's Democrats have suffered a few blows lately.

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5:09pm

Thu May 24, 2012
Election 2012

GOP Hopes Pennsylvania's Still Got That Swing

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney participates in a 6th-grade language arts class with Salina Beattie and other students at Universal Bluford Charter School on Thursday in Philadelphia.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was talking about education policy Thursday in Philadelphia.

Pennsylvania, with its 20 electoral votes, is a frequent stop for presidential candidates. But, amid a campaign likely to focus on a handful of battleground states, some are starting to wonder if Pennsylvania is still a swing state.

At the Universal Bluford Charter School in a largely African-American neighborhood in West Philadelphia, Romney toured a computer lab, helped students with an assignment in language arts class and listened to the kids sing.

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4:36pm

Thu May 24, 2012
NPR Story

U.S. Targets Al-Qaeda In Chatrooms, Banner Ads

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 12:37 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

For some time now, Al-Qaida has used the Internet to attract recruits. The group has launched chat rooms, online magazines, and their efforts to turn moderate Muslims into violent Jihadis have been fairly successful.

NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports that the State Department is now fighting back online.

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4:10pm

Thu May 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

What's Up, Doc? When Your Doctor Rushes Like The Road Runner

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Patients continue to complain that physicians don't spend enough time examining and talking with them.
iStockphoto.com

To physician Larry Shore of My Health Medical Group in San Francisco, it's no surprise that patients give doctors low marks for time and attention.

"There's some data to suggest that the average patient gets to speak for between 12 and 15 seconds before the physician interrupts them," Shore says. "And that makes you feel like the person is not listening."

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3:04pm

Thu May 24, 2012
Music Interviews

Regina Spektor Still Doesn't Write Anything Down

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

The songs on What We Saw From the Cheap Seats don't come just from the past year but from a span of "10 years or more," Regina Spektor says.
Shervin Lainez

In 2004, singer-songwriter Regina Spektor was a staple of the so-called anti-folk scene when she sat down for one of her first public-radio interviews with the now-defunct WNYC program The Next Big Thing. In the interview, she joked that she stayed up until 3:30 a.m. writing a song, trying not to wake the neighbors, but never wrote anything down.

She still doesn't.

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1:20pm

Thu May 24, 2012
Asia

Hard-Line Muslims Confront Indonesia's Christians

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 9:37 pm

Muslims (in the foreground) face a group of Christians during a bloody clash in Ambon, the provincial capital of Indonesia's Maluku Island, on Sept. 11, 2011. The riot exposed deep fault lines between Christians and Muslims in Indonesia.
Angkotasan Getty Images

In the city of Bekasi, Indonesia, outside Jakarta, a handful of Christians head to Sunday worship. But before they can reach their destination, they are stopped and surrounded by a large crowd of local Muslims who jeer at them and demand that they leave.

This is the Filadelfia congregation, a Lutheran group. They are ethnic Bataks from the neighboring island of Sumatra who have migrated to Bekasi, and they have been blocked from holding services on several occasions. Recently, a journalist who demonstrated in support of the congregation was beaten by an angry mob.

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5:27pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

By Putting Patients First, Hospital Tries To Make Care More Personal

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:22 pm

Patient Bob Berquist with Gregory Wagner, a doctor in the emergency department. Berquist, who volunteers at Fauquier Hospital, was admitted for low blood sugar when another nurse noticed he seemed dizzy.
John Rose NPR

No one likes to go to the hospital.

But some hospitals around the nation are trying to make their patients' stays a little less unpleasant.

They're members of an organization called Planetree, which was founded by a patient named Angelica Thieriot, who had a not-so-good hospital experience back in the 1970s.

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5:04pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Regional Coverage

IBM taps U of R for ideas to put Watson to work

The winning team. IBM's Dan Pelino, right, joins MBA students Muhammad Munir, Christian Beck, Jaimee Saxton and Enric Coll.
ibmphoto24 via Flickr

IBM's Watson already has Jeopardy! under its belt. Now Big Blue is turning to the University of Rochester's Simon School of Business for ideas on what to do next.

Manoj Saxena, the general manager of IBM's Watson Solutions unit, says the goal is finding ideas that will "take Watson from a Jeopardy-playing machine to a business-grade decision support system."

Twenty-five Simon MBA students were the first in the nation to partner with IBM on tackling that charge.

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5:02pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Law

Ousted Secret Service Agents May Ask For Jobs Back

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The director of the Secret Service assured a Senate committee, today, that a prostitution scandal involving his agents never compromised security. Mark Sullivan also apologized for behavior he said was reckless. It was Sullivan's first public testimony since news broke last month of Secret Service employees picking up prostitutes before a presidential visit to Colombia. He insisted this was an isolated incident.

But NPR's Tamara Keith reports, some on the committee weren't buying it.

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4:59pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Politics

Remember The Debt Ceiling Debate? It's Back

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:22 pm

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks at the 2012 Fiscal Summit held by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation on May 15 in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

A storm is brewing in Washington that could darken political debate for months to come. It's about the debt, the deficit, taxes and spending — all hot topics lawmakers have been fighting about for years now.

This time, though, there's a deadline, and the consequences of inaction would be immediate. That has many in Washington saying: Here we go again.

In the past week, President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner have begun a new round of sparring over the U.S. debt ceiling.

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4:36pm

Wed May 23, 2012
NPR Story

Facebook Underwriters Sued For Hiding Information

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:22 pm

Shares of Facebook on Wednesday made up a little of the ground they've lost since the company's troubled stock offering last week. But the company and its lead underwriter, Morgan Stanley, still face a lot of legal problems.

Some of the investors who bought shares of the company filed a lawsuit alleging that the two companies concealed information about Facebook's expected performance.

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4:36pm

Wed May 23, 2012
NPR Story

Defendant: Florida A&M Student Wanted To Be Hazed

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Hundreds of pages of evidence were released today in the hazing death of a Florida A&M band major. Last November, Robert Champion was beaten to death on a bus after a football game. Thirteen people have been charged in the case.

NPR's Kathy Lohr reports the documents released today provide an unsettling look at the hazing ritual that took place that night.

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4:30pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Music Reviews

By This 'Beak And Claw,' A Trio Shall Synthesize

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:55 pm

Left to right: Son Lux, Serengeti and Sufjan Stevens collaborate on a sometimes humorous but mostly beautiful EP.
Illustration by John Ciambriello

Sufjan Stevens is a classically trained singer-songwriter whose recent work has leaned symphonic. Son Lux is a classically trained beatmaker whose solo albums do indeed evoke luxury. Serengeti is a self-trained rapper who creates voices for a panoply of full-fledged characters who range from scufflers to yuppies. Billed as s / s / s, this ad hoc trio has just released an EP called Beak and Claw that somehow synthesizes their specialties.

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3:55pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Health

Potential for tick-borne illness increases after warm winter

Researchers are warning of a higher concentration of ticks this summer and thus more potential for tick-borne illnesses – like Lyme disease.

That’s because more ticks survived the warmer winter.

As a result, Senator Charles Schumer is pushing legislation that would increase education and research.

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3:50pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Politics

Senate candidate Wendy Long might have the upper hand in upstate NY

With a little more than a month to go before the Republican primary for U.S. Senate, recent polls show the three candidates vying for a chance to face Senator Kirsten Gillibrand in the general election aren't well known, especially upstate.

One of those candidates is trying to change that.

Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos is well known on Long Island; Congressman Bob Turner has a natural base in New York City; that leaves attorney Wendy Long with the rest of the state.

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2:24pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Planet Money

Where Dollars Are Born

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 9:05 am

Robert Benincasa NPR

DALTON, Mass. – If you were driving through this small town along the Housatonic River in the Berkshires, here's something you might not think about: All the bills in your wallet are visiting their birthplace.

The paper for U.S. currency, the substrate of everyday commerce, has been made here since 1879 by the Crane family.

Crane & Co. vice president Doug Crane represents the eighth generation descended from Stephen Crane, who was making paper before the American Revolution.

He gave NPR reporters a behind-the-scenes tour and talked about his company.

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5:50pm

Tue May 22, 2012
Author Interviews

I Vs. We: The 'Heart' Of Our Political Differences

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 6:45 pm

E.J. Dionne Jr. writes a weekly column for The Washington Post on national policy and politics. He lives in Bethesda, Md., with his wife, Mary, and their three children.
Paul Morigi Courtesy of Bloombury USA

For years now, the Tea Party has held individualism up as the great American value. But Washington Post columnist and Georgetown University professor E.J. Dionne Jr. says that while Americans have always prized individualism, they've prized community just as much.

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4:30pm

Tue May 22, 2012
Politics and Government

Gillibrand pushes for women and paycheck fairness

New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is pushing for the U.S. Senate to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act.

The proposed legislation would hold employers accountable for pay inequity among women employees. It would also make it easier for workers to pursue back pay and help women negotiate for higher salaries.

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4:30pm

Tue May 22, 2012
Author Interviews

'It Worked For Me': Life Lessons From Colin Powell

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 5:50 pm

If you're looking for advice on leadership, it's good to start with a four-star general. Colin Powell's new memoir, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership, is a collection of lessons learned and anecdotes drawn from his childhood in the Bronx, his military training and career, and his work under four presidential administrations. The memoir also includes Powell's candid reflections on the most controversial time in his career: the lead-up to the war in Iraq in 2003.

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8:21pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

All Routine PSA Tests For Prostate Cancer Should End, Task Force Says

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:33 pm

Terry Dyroff, at home in Silver Spring, Md., got a PSA blood test that led to a prostate biopsy. The biopsy found no cancer, but it gave him a life-threatening infection.
Jose Luis Magana AP

There they go again — those 17 federally appointed experts at the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force are telling American doctors and patients to stop routinely doing lifesaving tests.

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6:22pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Medical Treatments

Task Force: Men Don't Need Regular Prostate Tests

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 7:00 pm

A federal task force has concluded that men over 50 don't need a regular blood test for prostate cancer. Millions of men get the test every year. The task force says too many unnecessary treatments are being performed because of the test.

4:40pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Health

Technology could be key in allowing CNY residents an equal chance at healthy lives

There is a difference of up to 33 years of life expectancy depending on where you live in Central New York and there is no simple answer to creating equal health for all.

Economics, race and gender all figure into these health disparities but technology could play a major part in closing the healthcare gap found between many Americans.

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4:18pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Poetry

NewsPoet: Carmen Gimenez Smith's Day In Verse

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 11:30 am

Carmen Gimenez Smith visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Monday.
Claire O'Neill NPR

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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5:49pm

Sun May 20, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 8 Winner Is...

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:51 pm

iStockphoto.com

The end of Round 8 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest has finally arrived. With help from our readers at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, New York University, the University of Oregon and the University of Texas, at Austin, we've read through more than 6,000 stories.

Submissions had to be original works of short fiction — no more than 600 words. They also had to begin with this sentence: "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally, decided to walk through the door."

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5:17pm

Sun May 20, 2012
Health

Vets Return With Brain Injuries Oft Seen In Football

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just tuning in, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Here's a terrible statistic: Once a veteran is home from Iraq or Afghanistan, he or she is more likely to die by suicide than from injuries sustained in the combat theater. There is new research that suggests those injuries may actually be contributing to the suicides.

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2:59pm

Sun May 20, 2012
Music Interviews

Adam Lambert: 'I Want To Sing It Big'

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 5:19 pm

Adam Lambert's second studio album is entitled Trespassing.
Courtesy of the artist

Adam Lambert captivated America in 2009 when he almost won American Idol. Lambert was brash, likable and glamorous, but he soon became better known for being the first openly gay Idol contender.

Though Lambert finished as the runner-up, his popularity and talent won him a recording deal. He released his second studio album, Trespassing, this week — just a few months after his 30th birthday.

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3:17pm

Sat May 19, 2012
Music Interviews

John Mayer: Restoring An Image, And An Instrument

Originally published on Sat May 19, 2012 6:18 pm

John Mayer's new album, his first since a 2010 controversy that sent him retreating from the spotlight, is called Born and Raised.
Courtesy of the artist

John Mayer is one of the biggest-selling artists of the last decade — and with love interests like Jessica Simpson and Jennifer Aniston, one of its most pursued by the media. In 2010, he gave a pair of interviews to Rolling Stone and Playboy that shocked readers with sexually aggressive and racially insensitive language. Mayer seemed to be self-destructing in full view of his fans.

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6:34pm

Fri May 18, 2012
Remembrances

Baritone Fischer-Diskau Was One Of Opera's Greatest

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 11:51 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we briefly note the passing of one of the world's great opera singers: German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau died today. He was 86. From his first recital in Berlin in 1947 until his retirement in 1992, Fischer-Dieskau is in demand at opera houses and concert halls the world over. He was especially known for his interpretations of Schubert songs, like this one from the song cycle "Winterreise" or "Winter Journey."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WINTERREISE")

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