All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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5:03pm

Mon August 13, 2012
Regional Coverage

Repairs on Oswego lighthouse to begin soon

Kenneth Schunk Flickr

The city of Oswego is moving forward on its plans to restore the West Pierhead Lighthouse. But there will be several steps to the restoration process before it can be opened to the public.

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4:22pm

Mon August 13, 2012
Remembrances

'Cosmo' Editor Helen Gurley Brown Dies At 90

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:22 pm

When Helen Gurley Brown took the reins at Cosmo in 1965, it was a foundering monthly known for fiction. She remained at the helm for more than 30 years. Here, Brown poses at her office in New York in September 1985.
G. Paul Burnett AP

Helen Gurley Brown, the longtime editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, died Monday in New York at age 90.

If Cosmo was her biggest legacy, it was her 1962 best-seller, Sex and the Single Girl, that launched her to fame. She was 40, with a high-paying job in advertising and a recent marriage to Hollywood producer David Brown.

But she was writing for the single girls, not her privileged peers, says Jennifer Scanlon, author of a Brown biography called Bad Girls Go Everywhere.

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4:03pm

Mon August 13, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Wicked And Delicious: Devouring Roald Dahl

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 6:09 pm

cover detail

D.W. Gibson is the author of Not Working: People Talk About Losing a Job and Finding Their Way in Today's Changing Economy.

The bright white Heritage Park library opened up a mile from my house when I was 13, and the first thing I checked out was Roald Dahl's story collection Someone Like You. I should have known what I was in for because of that giant eyeball on the cover; but somehow I saw it as more of a temptation than a warning.

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3:43pm

Mon August 13, 2012
Music Reviews

Debo Band: Ethiopian Funk, Reinvented

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 6:09 pm

The debut album from Boston group Debo Band honors and updates the sound of "swinging Addis."
Shawn Brackbill

Boston's Debo Band takes inspiration from a golden era of popular music in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in the late '60s and early '70s. During a brief period of cultural freedom in Ethiopia, funk and soul music fused spectacularly with local traditions. Debo Band's debut album both honors and updates the sound of "swinging Addis."

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2:55pm

Mon August 13, 2012
Middle East

On Call-In Radio, Egypt's Leader Offers Reassurance

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 7:18 pm

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) speaks to the media on Aug. 6 in El Arish, Egypt. He has already been engaging with the public more regularly than his predecessor.
AP

When it comes to connecting with the Egyptian public, the country's new president, Mohammed Morsi, seems to have looked at what his predecessor did, and then plotted a course that is diametrically opposed.

During three decades of rule, the former president, Hosni Mubarak, would sometimes go months without making a public statement. When he did appear, it was almost always a formal presentation that seemed to emphasize the gulf between the leader and the ruled.

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4:59pm

Sun August 12, 2012
Music Interviews

The Very Best: A Would-Be Lion Chaser's Backup Plan

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 4:51 pm

Esau Mwamwaya and Johan Karlberg perform and record as The Very Best.
Niall Kenny Courtesy of the artist

How do a Swedish producer and a Malawian singer end up collaborating? The partnership that became The Very Best was sparked several years ago, when Johan Karlberg stopped into a London secondhand store that was run by the Malawi-born Esau Mwamwaya, and the two started talking music.

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4:53pm

Sun August 12, 2012
Law

Breaking Down Gun Violence: No 'Simple Formula'

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 4:59 pm

People attend a candlelight vigil for the victims of the Aug. 5 shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek, Wis., on Aug. 7.
Tom Lynn AP

In 1990, 78 percent of Americans supported tougher restrictions on gun sales, according to a Gallup poll. A decade later, that number fell to 44 percent.

Part of the reason has to do with how the debate has been framed: one between those who want to ban all guns and those who want to protect the right to own them.

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4:29pm

Sun August 12, 2012
Sports

Hard Lessons At the Olympics, Like The Metric System

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 4:59 pm

Turkey's Nevin Yanit (from left) United States' Kellie Wells and Russia's Tatyana Dektyareva compete in a women's 100-meter hurdles semifinal. Exactly how many yards is that?
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Olympic winners like gold medalist Claressa Shields have said the games were a learning experience, but what were they learning? Hard work? Sure. Sportsmanship? Maybe. The metric system? Certainly not.

U.S. judo competitor Kyle Vashkulat competes at 100 kg, which he knows means he weighs 220 lbs. But does he know height?

"We were in a sauna, and the guy's telling us the height of the boxers, and he's like, 'Yeah, this guy's like, 1.7 meters' — and we're like, 'How tall is that?'" Vashkulat says, laughing.

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3:32pm

Sun August 12, 2012
Presidential Race

Ryan Brings The Love To Romney's Campaign

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 4:59 pm

U.S. Republican vice presidential hopeful Paul Ryan greets supporters during a campaign rally in High Point, N.C., on Sunday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Since Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., came on the scene Saturday, Mitt Romney's rallies have felt different. The crowds are bigger. The audience is more raucous. Lines that used to be a routine part of the Republican presidential candidate's stump speech have become rousing battle cries.

At the NASCAR Technical Institute in Mooresville, N.C., 1,600 people crowded into the room and thousands more swarmed outside.

"I feel like I'm in Woodstock," gubernatorial candidate Pat McCrory exclaimed. "There's a parking jam!"

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2:17pm

Sun August 12, 2012
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Peter Hedges Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 4:59 pm

The Kobal Collection / PARAMOUNT

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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12:29pm

Sun August 12, 2012
The Two-Way

New President's Dismissals Shock Egypt's Politicos

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 6:29 pm

New Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is asserting his authority in the boldest move he's made since assuming the nation's top job.

Update at 4:08 p.m. More Details

The Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president, ordered the retirement of Defense Minister Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi and Chief of Staff Gen. Sami Annan. He also restored to the office of the president powers taken from it by the military before his election.

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5:42pm

Sat August 11, 2012
It's All Politics

From 'Very Excited' To Predicting 'Disaster': What Wis. Says About Paul Ryan

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 10:23 pm

U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. stands during a listening session in April 2011 in Kenosha, Wis. He is now presidential candidate Mitt Romney's running mate.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

News that Paul Ryan was chosen as Mitt Romney's running mate had people in his hometown of Janesville, Wis., abuzz Saturday morning. But the strong feelings Ryan provokes elsewhere for and against his policies were also evident.

On her way into the Janesville post office, Corrine Smith has a smile on her face. She and her husband are both big Paul Ryan supporters, and they were thrilled when they heard the news.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

Ryan, With 'Alternative Agenda,' Had Quick GOP Rise

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

MITT ROMNEY: It's an honor to announce my running mate and the next vice president of the United States, Paul Ryan.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

Paul Ryan's Agenda: Now Romney's?

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's go now to Vin Weber, former Minnesota congressman and a senior adviser to Mitt Romney. Vin Weber, thanks for joining us.

VIN WEBER: Great to be with you today.

RAZ: You have known Paul Ryan for a long time, since before he was a member of Congress. How did you know him?

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

That's The Ticket: Romney And Ryan Kick Off Tour

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

And as we've been reporting, Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan has joined Mitt Romney on the GOP presidential ticket. The two men launched a multiday, multistate bus tour this morning. They spent much of the day in Virginia where crowds came out to cheer them on, including in Ashland, where Paul Ryan spoke.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

The Possible Future Of Health Care, Given VP Pick

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

So what makes Paul Ryan such a bold pick and potentially such a risky one is the detailed budget plan he has now twice passed through the GOP-controlled House. That plan has not passed the Senate, and President Obama says if it reached his desk, he'd veto it. The heart of Ryan's plan calls for dramatic changes to the nation's largest government health programs, Medicare and Medicaid.

With us now to discuss what those changes could mean for the campaign and the country should Romney and Ryan win the race is NPR's Julie Rovner. Julie, hello.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

What An Ayn Rand View Could Do To Romney's Campaign

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:31 pm

Mitt Romney's newly announced running mate, Paul Ryan, has long subscribed to the objectivist philosophies of novelist Ayn Rand. Host Guy Raz speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about how that approach to public policy will play with voters.

5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Politics

What's In A Keynote? Making A Splash At Conventions

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

So now that we know who Mitt Romney's running mate is, what about the keynote speaker at the Republican Convention later this month? No word yet. Democrats have announced that San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro will get that coveted spot that has, in the past, served as a platform for bigger things.

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5:03pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Presidential Race

New GOP Team Brings Its Message To America

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

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2:36pm

Sat August 11, 2012
Books

Batman's Biggest Secret (No, It's Not Bruce Wayne)

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 4:41 pm

Bill Finger (left) helped create the Batman we know today, including his iconic costume, his tragic backstory, and many of his adversaries.
Ty Templeton

Batman has many secrets — the best-known one, of course, being his millionaire alter ego, Bruce Wayne. But that may not be the Dark Knight's biggest secret.

Since the 1930s, only one man has been given credit for creating the caped crusader and his home city of Gotham. Bob Kane's name appears in the credits of all the movies, the campy TV show and the associated merchandise, from video games and action figures to sheets and underwear.

But what if Bob Kane didn't do it all by himself?

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12:44pm

Sat August 11, 2012
A Blog Supreme

Branford Marsalis On Sensitive Musicians And The First Family Of Jazz

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:13 pm

Branford Marsalis spoke with NPR about modern jazz, his family, and his new album, Four MFs Playin' Tunes.
Courtesy of Marsalis Music.

Saxophonist Branford Marsalis, oldest son of New Orleans pianist and educator Ellis Marsalis, released an album with his quartet this week. He spoke to weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz about the failings of modern jazz, his hopes for the next generation and leaving New York City to move back to the South.

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8:58am

Sat August 11, 2012
The Salt

Summer Lobster Surplus Leads To Cross-Border Price War Between Trappers

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:38 am

Blockades set up by lobster trappers in Canada have disrupted Maine's lobster business.
Robert F Bukaty AP

You might imagine a war between lobster trappers to be something like this battle of the lobsters. OK, not really. Still, the price war heating up between the fishing folk in Maine and Canada this summer is bringing everybody down.

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5:27pm

Fri August 10, 2012
The Torch

Gaming The Games: The Rules That Got Bent In London

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 8:06 pm

Cameron van der Burgh of South Africa celebrates his gold medal in the men's 100m breaststroke. He later admitted that he took extra dolphin kicks during his swim, a violation of the rules.
Adam Pretty Getty Images

The London Summer Olympics are winding down, and by most accounts, the games have been a success. There were plenty of "thrill of victory, agony of defeat" moments; big, enthusiastic crowds — although there were too many blocks of empty seats; and for those who like a helping of scandal served up at their Olympics, there was that, too.

It wasn't the usual scourge of doping. Instead, the London Olympics had incidents of bending the rules and ethics of sport.

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5:05pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Politics and Government

Area congresswoman proposes tax law change

Central New York Congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle sponsored a bill in the House of Representatives that she hopes will close a tax loophole that benefits federal employees. The bill would make sure that retirement plans of federal workers are not taxed differently than those of private sector employees.  

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5:00pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Remembrances

David Rakoff Saw The World In All Its Dark Beauty

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 7:04 pm

David Rakoff, the author of Half Empty, Don't Get Too Comfortable and Fraud, was a frequent contributor to This American Life. He died Thursday at the age of 47.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

When writer David Rakoff died Thursday at the age 47, he was barely the age he said he was always "meant" to be. In his 2010 memoir, Half Empty, he wrote, "Everyone has an internal age, a time in life when one is, if not one's best, then at very least one's most authentic self. I always felt that my internal clock was calibrated somewhere between 47 and 53 years old."

Rakoff died in New York City after a long struggle with cancer — an ordeal that he wrote about with sobering honesty and biting wit.

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4:53pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Politics and Government

Richard Hanna on being a "moderate"

Central New York Representative Richard Hanna knows he comes down on the moderate side of his Republican colleagues in Congress.

Speaking this week during a visit to Central Square, which sits in the newly drawn 22nd congressional district he is running for re-election in, the first-term congressman talked about influences from his more conservative colleagues.

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4:41pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Education

New charter school proposed for Utica

A charter school in Syracuse is hoping to expand to another part of central New York. The school believes it can provide another option for children and parents.

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4:40pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Middle East

Sunni Cleric Rises To Challenge Hezbollah In Lebanon

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 9:45 am

Sheik Ahmad Assir speaks to supporters at a tent encampment set up in protest against Hezbollah in Sidon, Lebanon. He accuses the Islamist militant group of using resistance against Israel as a smokescreen for another aim: advancing Iranian regional hegemony.
Mohamad al-Baba NPR

On a recent day, baffled motorists honked their horns and veered around the blocked entrance to a major street in Sidon. Now Lebanon's third-largest city, Sidon was once a flourishing Phoenician city-state on the Mediterranean.

The street was closed off by Sunni cleric Sheik Ahmad Assir, who erected a small tent encampment in protest against the country's most powerful military and political force, the militant Islamist group Hezbollah.

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4:38pm

Fri August 10, 2012
U.S.

Puedes Believe It? Spanglish Gets In El Dictionary

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:47 pm

Spanglish, a mixture of English and Spanish, has been spoken for more than a century. A sign in Spanglish advertises a yard sale in Los Angeles in 2009.
Aurelio Jose Barrera Landov

The Royal Spanish Academy — the official arbiter of the Spanish language — recently announced that it will add the word "Espanglish" to the 2014 edition of its dictionary. This is a big deal for the traditionally conservative academy, and it's a big deal for supporters who feel that mix of Spanish and English has officially been ignored for more than a century.

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4:26pm

Fri August 10, 2012
Monkey See

Can NBC Get Its Fall Shows Into The Olympic Spotlight?

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:47 pm

Matthew Perry and Brett Gelman of NBC's Go On appear in a promo shot especially for the Olympics.
Justin Lubin NBC

With the Olympics drawing to a close, NBC is looking especially golden. They have had two weeks of great ratings — including record highs. What better time than on the eve of the network's new fall season to rack up two weeks of record audiences? But what might seem a slam dunk for the network is anything but.

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