All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

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2:32pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Regional Coverage

Remembering fallen members of the police force

Matt Johnston

It was a day of remembrance today in Syracuse at the newly renovated Forman Park. Mayor Stephanie Miner, Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler, and Onondaga County Sheriff Kevin Walsh were all on hand to honor members of the police force that have fallen in the line of duty.

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5:13pm

Mon May 14, 2012
Asia

India Debates Re-Banning Homosexuality

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 5:44 pm

India's Supreme Court is now weighing arguments by opponents and proponents of legal homosexuality. Same-sex relationships were decriminalized in 2009, but a number of political, social and religious groups are fighting to reinstate a colonial-era law that punished homosexual acts with prison time. Public health workers say legal recognition of India's gay community is critical in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

4:55pm

Mon May 14, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Garth Knox: One Viola And 1,000 Years Of Musical History

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 7:49 pm

On Garth Knox's new album, Saltarello, the adventurous violist creates surprising musical juxtapositions.
Dániel Vass ECM Records

Garth Knox was born to play the viola. As a youngster, he already had two sisters who played violin and a brother who played cello. "So for the family string quartet," Knox says, "it was very clear from the start which instrument I would play."

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4:05pm

Mon May 14, 2012
The Record

Stax Bassist Duck Dunn Remembered In Memphis

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:49 pm

Donald "Duck" Dunn onstage about 1990.
David Redfern Redferns/Getty Images

5:49pm

Sun May 13, 2012
Television

Johnny Carson: 'King Of Late Night,' A Man Unknown

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 6:52 pm

The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962 - 1992 NBC) c. 1970's
NBC/Photofest

Fifty years ago, Johnny Carson became the host of The Tonight Show. During his 30 years as host, he reached a nightly audience of 15 million people and became one of the most trusted and famous men in America.

But Carson was intensely private off-screen, and very few people — including members of his own family--really knew him. Documentary filmmaker Peter Jones wanted to try and change that. Once a year, for 15 years, Jones sent Carson a letter, begging him for permission to make a documentary on his life.

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5:15pm

Sun May 13, 2012
Television

'King Of Late Night' Explores Carson's Life, Legacy

Fifty years ago, Johnny Carson became the host of NBC's The Tonight Show. During his 30 years as host, he reached a nightly audience of 15 million people and became one of the most trusted and famous men in America. But Carson was intensely private off-screen, and very few people — including members of his own family — really knew him. Documentary filmmaker Peter Jones wanted to try and change that. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks to director Peter Jones about his new documentary, Johnny Carson: King of Late Night which airs on PBS Monday, May 14.

4:18pm

Sun May 13, 2012
Author Interviews

Lessons In Counterterrorism From The Octopus

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 6:52 pm

iStockPhoto.com

In 2002, Rafe Sagarin was working in Washington, D.C., as a science adviser. It wasn't long after the Sept. 11 attacks, and Sagarin started paying attention to the security measures on Capitol Hill.

"I'd watch these other Capitol Hill staffers and I noticed that they'd just put their hand over the keys in their pockets so they didn't have to waste 30 seconds putting it on the conveyer belt though the security screening — and that didn't set off the alarm when they did that," Sagarin tells host of weekend All Things Considered Guy Raz.

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2:23pm

Sun May 13, 2012
Why Music Matters

Stop The Music: A Dancer Tries Silence

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 10:24 am

Amy O'Neal, a modern dance choreographer, recently took on the challenge of performing without music.
Gabriel Bienczycki Courtesy of the artist

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with stories of music fans, told in their own words. Today's story is about Amy O'Neal, a choreographer who took on the challenge of dancing in complete silence.

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5:23pm

Sat May 12, 2012
History

How Teddy Saved Football

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:05 pm

Football is a violent game, but a century ago it used to be a lethal pastime. NPR's Tom Goldman explains how President Teddy Roosevelt stepped in and forced the establishment of new rules that made the game safer.

5:17pm

Sat May 12, 2012
Author Interviews

The 12 Days Of Disaster That Made Modern Chicago

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:05 pm

In 1919, Chicago was called the "youngest great city in the world." World War I had just come to a close, troops were coming home, industry was booming and crime was down. Chicago's mayor at the time, William Hale Thompson — known as Big Bill — had just been re-elected and was spearheading an ambitious urban improvement program.

But in mid-July of 1919, just about everything that could go wrong in Chicago did. Among the headlines were a deadly dirigible crash, a bizarre kidnapping, race riots and a major public transit strike.

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12:03pm

Sat May 12, 2012
Music Interviews

Days With Dizzy: Arturo Sandoval On His Trumpet Mentor

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 6:10 pm

Arturo Sandoval and Dizzy Gillespie on tour in Europe in 1991. Sandoval's new album, Dear Diz (Every Day I Think of You), is a tribute to his friend and mentor.
Courtesy of the artist

Cuban trumpeter Arturo Sandoval first met Dizzy Gillespie in Havana in 1977, when the American jazzman came to Cuba to play a concert. Sandoval showed him around the city, where the two men listened to the sounds of rumba music echoing through Havana's black neighborhoods. That night, Sandoval managed to play his trumpet for Gillespie — and blew him away.

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6:52pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Business

What Caused JPMorgan's Loss Of $2 Billion?

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:35 pm

Audie Cornish speaks with Gregory Zuckerman about one of the men behind JPMorgan Chase's $2 billion loss. He's a special writer for The Wall Street Journal and author of The Greatest Trade Ever.

5:08pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Regional Coverage

Bill Owens' $20,000 trip to Taiwan is questioned

Congressman Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh) says he will repay more than $20,000 for a junket that he took last December to Taiwan.  The trip was paid for by a university in Taiwan.  But it was planned and organized by a New York lobbying firm, which is no longer allowed under House of Representatives ethics rules. 

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4:15pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Media

'News Of The World' Editor Grilled At Leveson Inquiry

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The British got an intriguing glimpse today into the secret world of the powerful. They heard from Rebekah Brooks, a close advisor to Rupert Murdoch and a former tabloid editor. She was caught up in the phone hacking scandal that's engulfed Murdoch's British operations.

Today, Brooks testified to a media ethics inquiry. It's investigating the close relationship between Britain's press and its politicians. NPR's Philip Reeves has the story.

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4:15pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Medical Treatments

FDA May Back Pill To Prevent HIV

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 6:52 pm

A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel is recommending that the agency approve the first pill to protect people from getting infected with the HIV. The recommendation is being hailed as a potential milestone in the battle against the AIDs epidemic. If the Food and Drug Administration goes along with the recommendation, the drug would become the first to be approved to prevent HIV infections. Melissa Block talks to Rob Stein.

4:21pm

Thu May 10, 2012
Author Interviews

'Freeman': A Liberated Slave In Search Of Family

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 10:50 pm

A new novel from writer Leonard Pitts Jr. jolts you back to the chaos of post-Civil War America. At a time when families of slaves were freed — but not necessarily together.

In hope of reuniting with their families, some freed slaves placed classified ads in newspapers:

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2:49pm

Thu May 10, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Where Do We Go?' Lebanese Women Pave The Way

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 10:50 pm

Muslim and Christian women team up to try everything imaginable to distract their men from war in the Lebanese film Where Do We Go Now? Director and actress Nadine Labaki plays the lead role of Amale.
Rudy Bou Chebel Sony Pictures Classic

Where Do We Go Now? is the brainchild of bloodshed. The film, which has been a megahit in the Middle East, is a bittersweet comedy about a group of women determined to stop their hotheaded men from starting a religious war. It's the second feature film from Lebanese director Nadine Labaki.

When violence erupted on the streets of Beirut in 2008, Labaki saw neighbors, friends, people who were practically brothers turn against each another. As the world around her spiraled out of control, Labaki discovered she was having a baby.

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5:37pm

Wed May 9, 2012
NPR Story

Sen. Richard Lugar Loses Seat To Tea Party Challenger

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block, with news tonight that six-term veteran Republican Sen. Richard Lugar has been defeated. The Indiana politician lost the Republican primary there to State Treasurer Richard Mourdock, who was backed by the Tea Party - and who said that Lugar was not conservative enough.

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5:10pm

Wed May 9, 2012
Politics

Andrew Sullivan On Obama's Support Of Gay Marriage

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For reaction now, we turn to writer and political blogger Andrew Sullivan. He is gay and married, and for years has been a leading advocate of same-sex marriage. He's the editor of the blog "The Dish" at The Daily Beast website. And, Andrew, I take it from what I've seen on your blog this afternoon you have mixed feelings about this development.

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5:00pm

Wed May 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Paul Thorn: Music From The Margins

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:19 pm

Paul Thorn's new, all-covers album is called What the Hell Is Goin' On?
Courtesy of the artist

Before Paul Thorn made his living as a singer, he was a professional boxer. He also spent 12 years working at a furniture factory in his hometown of Tupelo, Miss.

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4:56pm

Wed May 9, 2012
Politics and Government

Gov. Cuomo makes remarks on same-sex marriage legislation

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he didn't discuss the effort to legalize gay marriage during his private conversations with President Barack Obama Monday, and doesn't intent to push the issue.

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2:49pm

Wed May 9, 2012
You Must Read This

Beyond The 'Blonde': A Look At Marilyn's Inner Life

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:19 pm

Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Manuel Munoz's first novel is What You See in the Dark.

Think Julianne Moore's take on Sarah Palin, or Meryl Streep's depiction of Margaret Thatcher.

Actors in biopics have a major leg up on writers when it comes to developing character. Even casual viewers can judge the performance a success if it mimics what we remember of the public persona.

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5:48pm

Tue May 8, 2012
Children's Health

A Daughter With Down Syndrome Is The Perfect Sister

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:07 pm

Kelle Hampton's daughter, Lainey, loved her little sister, Nella, before she even met her.
Kelle Hampton

Kelle Hampton is the author of the memoir Bloom: Finding Beauty in the Unexpected.

"See that right there?" the obstetrician asked as she glided the sonogram wand across my middle and pointed to a blurry image on the monitor. "It's a girl," she announced.

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3:18pm

Tue May 8, 2012
Music Reviews

Chicha Libre: Sonic Predators Rock Peruvian Grooves

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:07 pm

A Brooklyn band with musicians from three continents, Chicha Libre has just released its second album, Canibalismo.
Txuca

Chicha is a corn-derived liquor native to the South American Andes since ancient times. It's also a quirky style of pop music that developed in the Peruvian Amazon in the 1960s and '70s. All of that provides inspiration for the Brooklyn band Chicha Libre, which has just released its second album, Canibalismo.

Founder Olivier Conan developed a passion for chicha music while crate-digging through old vinyl in Peru. He says all pop-music innovators are really sonic predators.

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1:30pm

Tue May 8, 2012
Planet Money

Nobel Laureate: 'I've Been Wrong So Often, I Don't Find It Extraordinary At All'

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:07 pm

"I'm 101 at the moment," Ronald Coase said.
University of Chicago

I recently had a brief conversation with Ronald Coase.

"I'm 101 at the moment," he told me. "I get older by the minute."

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12:41pm

Tue May 8, 2012
Remembrances

Sendak's Legacy: Helping Kids 'Survive Childhood'

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:49 am

Sendak talks with children about his book Where the Wild Things Are at the International Youth Library in Munich in June 1971.
Keystone/Hulton Archives Getty Images

When author and illustrator Maurice Sendak entered the world of children's books, it was a very safe place. Stories were sweet and simple and set in a world without disorder. But Sendak, who died Tuesday at age 83, broke with that tradition. In Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak explored the darker side of childhood. Upstairs in young Max's bedroom, a jungle grows, and he sails off to a land of monsters.

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5:59pm

Mon May 7, 2012
NPR Story

U.S. Foils Terrorist Plot To Target Airplane

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 8:26 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

U.S. authorities say they have foiled a terrorist plot to target an airliner. A suicide bomber was planning to bring down a plane headed to the United States. The Associated Press first reported the story. Al-Qaida's affiliate group in Yemen is believed to be behind the plot, which national security officials say had not advanced far enough, that the suspect bought plane tickets or tried to board a plane.

NPR's Carrie Johnson has been reporting on this story. She joins me now. And, Carrie, what else have you found out?

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4:22pm

Mon May 7, 2012
Regional Coverage

SRC Arena: Caught in a public/private partnership

Monday's Onondaga County budget hearing.
Ellen Abbott

Onondaga Community College continues to turn over information regarding the SRC Arena, and three other not-for-profit entities, to county lawmakers who requested it last week. The flap over this financial information and its availability to the public is the result of a new world of public/private partnerships.

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6:02pm

Sun May 6, 2012
Author Interviews

'Teachers Make' A Difference, What About You?

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 10:45 am

iStockPhoto.com

5:48pm

Sun May 6, 2012
Arts & Life

When Dick Cavett Shared Carnegie Hall With Groucho

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 6:39 pm

In 1970, Groucho Marx appeared on the Dick Cavett Show. Two years later, Cavett introduced Groucho in Carnegie Hall.
Ann Limongello ABC via Getty Images

Forty years ago Sunday, history was made at Carnegie Hall.

On May 6, 1972, comedian Groucho Marx made his debut at the famed New York venue to a packed house. Tickets sold out as soon as it was announced.

Marx was 81 at the time and had been out of the spotlight for many years. His one-man show only toured a handful of venues, and his Carnegie Hall show was later released as an album called An Evening with Groucho.

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