All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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12:44pm

Mon April 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Adam Cohen: On Intimacy, Antagonism And Influence

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 5:14 pm

Adam Cohen says he's proud to be the son of singer Leonard Cohen.
Courtesy of the artist

During the course of his career, singer-songwriter Adam Cohen says he has twisted himself into creating commercially successful music — but not this record, not this song. "What Other Guy," from his third album Like A Man, didn't seem likely to generate mainstream popularity. And yet it did, more than any other song he has ever recorded.

The son of iconic singer Leonard Cohen, Adam Cohen says his latest record is a celebration and demonstration of his father's influence on his music.

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12:28pm

Mon April 9, 2012
Music Reviews

The Toure-Raichel Collective: A Collaboration By Accident

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 5:14 pm

Vieux Farka Toure (left) and Idan Raichel, collaborating as The Toure-Raichel Collective, released The Tel-Aviv Session on March 26.
Nitzan Treystman

Idan Raichel is one of Israel's top-selling pop musicians. Vieux Farka Toure is a virtuoso guitarist from Mali. The two met by chance in a German airport, and when Toure played a concert in Tel Aviv, Raichel sat in. He enjoyed himself so much that he invited Toure and two other musicians to come to a studio the next day and jam. The music they created is now an album called The Tel Aviv Session.

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4:57pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Monkey See

Lena Dunham's 'Girls': Still Sex, Still The City, Different Show

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 8:15 am

Lena Dunham stars in HBO's new series, Girls, premiering April 15.
Jojo Whilden HBO

Lena Dunham's new series Girls debuts on HBO on April 15. Dunham, who got quite a bit of attention for being the star, director and writer of the 2010 indie film Tiny Furniture, fills the same three roles in this ensemble show about four young women in New York.

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3:37pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Author Interviews

Ignore 'The Mama's Boy Myth': Keep Your Boys Close

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 7:16 pm

Author Kate Stone Lombardi is the recipient of six Clarion awards. She has written for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
Nancy Borowick

There are plenty of pop culture references to the dangers of a close mother-son relationship. From the myth of Oedipus to the movie Psycho, narrative after narrative harps on the idea that mothers can damage their sons, make them weak, awkward and dependent.

But for millions of men, the opposite has turned out to be true, author Kate Lombardi tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. Lombardi — a mother herself — is the author of the new book, The Mama's Boy Myth: Why Keeping Our Sons Close Makes Them Stronger.

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3:00pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Around the Nation

Suspects Arrested In Okla. Shootings

Two men have been arrested in connection with the shooting deaths of three people in Tulsa, Okla., last Friday. Amanda Bland, a reporter for the Tulsa World, discusses the arrests.

4:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
Music Interviews

Rosie Thomas: Restarting A Musical Life 'With Love'

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 5:32 pm

Rosie Thomas' latest album is titled With Love.
Courtesy of the artist

With Love is singer Rosie Thomas' first full-length album in four years, and she's experienced many ups and downs in that time. One of the downs was an injury: Her thyroid broke, causing her to take a hiatus from music.

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3:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
NPR Story

For India, An Unclear Visit From Pakistan's President

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari is scheduled to make a one-day visit to India on Sunday, April 8. It's the first visit by a Pakistani president since 2005. However Zardari's trip is being described as a personal visit in an attempt to keep expectations low and to allow both sides room to avoid confronting difficult issues, such as Indian demands that Pakistan do more to fight terrorism. Elliot Hannon reports from New Delhi.

3:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
NPR Story

Week In News: Obama, Romney Eye General Election

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 6:25 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Businesses created another 121,000 jobs last month in the unemployment rate ticked down. Our economy has now created more than four million private sector jobs over the past two years.

MITT ROMNEY: A record number of Americans are now living in poverty. And the most vulnerable are the ones that have been hurt the most. Thirty percent of single moms are now living in poverty.

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3:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
Around the Nation

A New Turn In Calif. 'Shaken Baby' Case

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR reporter Joseph Shapiro about the sentence of Shirley Ree Smith's "shaken baby" case. California Gov. Jerry Brown has commuted Smith's sentence. Despite her claims of innocence, Smith was convicted in December 1997, and has been free since 2006 awaiting the results of her appeals.

4:42pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Movie Reviews

To Be Or Not To Be (The Pope) Is The Question

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 7:01 pm

IFC Films

When the College of Cardinals gathers in the Vatican to choose a new church leader — formally the Bishop of Rome — it announces its selection with the Latin phrase "Habemus papam" ("We have a pope").

But suppose that, when a cardinal steps out onto a balcony in St. Peter's Square to utter those fateful words, the gentle soul in white sitting behind him, out of sight of the crowd, develops stage fright.

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4:23pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Music Interviews

Gotye: 'Less Of A Musician, More Of A Tinkerer'

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 10:47 am

Australian pop singer Wouter "Wally" De Backer is better known as Gotye.
Courtesy of the artist

The Australian artist Gotye has been big in his home country for several years, but this winter, one particular song started an avalanche. "Somebody That I Used to Know," from the album Making Mirrors, has been a massive hit everywhere it's landed: the U.K., Germany, South Africa, Israel and now here in the U.S. It even inspired a YouTube cover that's become a runaway hit all its own.

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3:00pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Pop Culture

Toy Companies Debut Bald Dolls For Cancer

A lineup of the bald Bratz and Moxie Girlz dolls that are scheduled to hit store shelves this summer.
MGA Entertainment

Barbie is best known for her curvy figure and long blond hair — but Mattel plans to produce a doll that's a dramatic departure from that classic image.

This Barbie will be bald.

Mattel decided to make the doll after a campaign by Jane Bingham, a survivor of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Philadelphia. She started a Facebook group with her friend called "Beautiful and Bald Barbie." She tells Audie Cornish, host of All Things Considered, that they wanted the toymaker to create a doll for kids who have cancer or have lost their hair for medical reasons.

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2:03pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Book Reviews

100 Years Later, The Titanic Lives On In Letters

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 6:23 pm

The ill-fated Titanic rests at Harland and Wolff's shipyard, Belfast, in February 1912.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

When I hear the word "Titanic," I picture a tuxedoed Leonardo DiCaprio, waiting at the bottom of a gilded staircase while the voice of Celine Dion swells in my mind. It's all Edwardian glitz and glamour, decadence and passionate love, the kind best enjoyed in a dark theater with plenty of popcorn. And then I quickly remember that the ship sinks, and that Titanic is more than just an epic film from my youth. On April 15, a century will have passed since the ship plummeted into the icy Atlantic, and it is the tragedy we should remember, not just the mythology surrounding it.

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5:20pm

Thu April 5, 2012
The Record

'Something Bigger And Louder': The Legacy Of Jim Marshall And His Amp

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:53 am

Lemmy Kilmister immortalized the Marshall amp in the Motorhead song, "Dr. Rock": "Chin up, shoulders back / You've got a body like a Marshall stack."
Dave Etheridge-Barnes Getty Images

3:45pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Monkey See

Kerry Washington On Bringing Washington 'Scandal' To TV

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 5:58 pm

Kerry Washington plays Olivia Pope on ABC's new drama, Scandal.
Danny Feld ABC

Kerry Washington knows that her new drama, Scandal, will inevitably be compared to another drama about D.C.: The West Wing. Scandal tells Audie Cornish on today's All Things Considered that it even has Josh Malina, a West Wing cast member, for a little of what she calls "secret D.C. credibility."

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3:45pm

Wed April 4, 2012
Monkey See

Fred Savage: A Child Star Makes Good, With Less Than Wholesome Comedies

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 6:05 pm

The face you may remember: Fred Savage cuddles up with a puppy on The Wonder Years, in a photo from December 1989.
ABC Photo Archives Getty Images

Former Child Star Fatigue. Many of us have suffered it, given the drug problems, the meltdowns, the awful nude photos.

But then there's Fred Savage, who starred in the ABC show The Wonder Years from 1988 through 1993. Now he's a successful, slightly offbeat 35-five-year-old television producer and director. He works on wicked, slightly warped comedies including Party Down, It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia and as of today, Best Friends Forever. His first network sitcom premieres tonight on NBC.

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3:35pm

Wed April 4, 2012
Planet Money

Where Money Meets Power In Washington

iStockphoto.com

"Political fundraiser" has a fancy ring to it — tuxedos, famous singers, billionaires. In fact, most political fundraisers aren't that glamorous.

Think instead of a dozen lobbyists eating breakfast with a Congressman in a side room at some DC restaurant. Off in a corner, someone who works for the Congressman is holding the checks the lobbyists brought to get in the door.

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11:05pm

Tue April 3, 2012
NPR Story

Wisconsin Primary In Focus

Audie Cornish talks to NPR's Ron Elving, Ari Shapiro and David Welna about the Republican primary in Wisconsin.

11:05pm

Tue April 3, 2012
NPR Story

Romney Sweeps Primaries In Wis., Md., D.C.

Audie Cornish talks to NPR's Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving about Tuesday's primaries in Wisconsin, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.

5:22pm

Tue April 3, 2012
It's All Politics

Will 2008's Surge In Young Voters Continue In 2012?

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 11:05 pm

Supporters of Texas Rep. Ron Paul cheer as the Republican presidential candidate speaks on March 28 at the University of Maryland in College Park, Md.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Historically, young people have been much less likely to vote than older Americans.

That trend has started to change in the past few presidential election cycles, especially in 2008, when a census report found that 49 percent of those ages 18 to 24 who were eligible to vote participated in the presidential election.

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3:10pm

Tue April 3, 2012
Music Reviews

Dr. John: Swamp Grooves From The Bayou Underworld

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 10:41 am

Dan Auerbach (left) joins Dr. John on the latter's new album, Locked Down.
Alysse Gafkjen

Right now, Dan Auerbach is living a rock-star moment, with his hard-hitting blues-rock duo The Black Keys selling out arenas all over the country. Lots of people want him on their records. So what does he do? He seeks out the 71-year-old Dr.

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5:59pm

Mon April 2, 2012
Around the Nation

7 Dead After Shooting Rampage At Calif. University

Audie Cornish speaks with Richard Gonzales, about Monday's shooting rampage at a university in Oakland. Seven people were killed and three others wounded when a gunman opened fire.

3:28pm

Mon April 2, 2012
Music Interviews

Hello? Is This The Country Album You're Looking For?

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:12 pm

Tuskegee," Lionel Richie says, "it would be called All the Songs That They Told Me Would Ruin My Career."" href="/post/hello-country-album-youre-looking" class="noexit lightbox">
"If I had to have another title for this record besides Tuskegee," Lionel Richie says, "it would be called All the Songs That They Told Me Would Ruin My Career."
Alan Silfen UMG Nashville

You know who's got a country album out right now? Lionel Richie. The same Lionel Richie who started his career in the funk band The Commodores — that's right, the group that made "Brick House."

But on his new album, titled Tuskegee, country artists from Tim McGraw to Darius Rucker re-imagine the ballads that made Richie famous. These are the songs that have become slow-dance staples at proms and weddings everywhere.

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7:00am

Mon April 2, 2012
Three Books...

Secret Worlds: 3 Magical Myths For Grown-Ups

iStockphoto.com

We have all felt the ethereal siren song of other universes — the thrilling suspicion that touching a certain ring may in fact suck you into a Wood Between the Worlds, or that if you walk just so between platforms nine and 10 at King's Cross Station, you might find yourself departing from platform nine and three-quarters. For some, the tingling sensation of magical lands fades after leaving childhood behind. But I still peer curiously into wardrobes, and thus here are three blazingly intelligent adult novels for the untamable Alice in all of us.

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4:15pm

Sun April 1, 2012
Arts & Life

'Did Jesus Exist?' A Historian Makes His Case

So, did Jesus really exist? With his new book, Did Jesus Exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth, Bart Ehrman, historian and professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, wanted to provide solid historical evidence for the existence of Jesus.

"I wanted to approach this question as an historian to see whether that's right or not," Ehrman tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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3:38pm

Sun April 1, 2012
Strange News

N.Y. Preschool Starts DNA Testing For Admission

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:46 am

At the Porsafillo Preschool Academy, there are 32 spots but more than 12,000 applications.
iStockphoto.com

For years, New York parents have been applying to preschools even before their youngsters are born. That's not new, but the approach one prestigious pre-school on the Upper West Side is.

At the Porsafillo Preschool Academy, all applicants must now submit a DNA analysis of their children.

The preschool is housed in a modern glass and steel building designed by IM Pei. It's situated in a leafy corner of the Upper West Side. On a recent afternoon, Headmaster Rebecca Unsinn showed off "Porsafillo Pre," as it's called.

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5:40pm

Sat March 31, 2012
Author Interviews

Fight For Klimt Portrait A Fight To Reclaim History

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 5:43 pm

In Germany, a federal court has ruled that the German Historical Museum in Berlin must return a rare collection of handcrafted posters to the son of the original owner. The posters were seized by the Nazis from a Jewish art collector in the 1930s.

The case is one of dozens in recent years in which art stolen by the Nazis from Jews has been returned to descendants.

The most famous case involved Gustav Klimt's masterpiece, the Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer. The golden, shimmering painting of the high society hostess became known as Austria's Mona Lisa.

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3:00pm

Sat March 31, 2012
Arts & Life

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 8 Submissions Closed

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

More than 6,000 stories came in this round of Three-Minute Fiction - 6000. Amazing. The challenge this time, the story had to begin with the sentence: She closed the book, placed it on the table and finally decided to walk through the door. It's going to take us several weeks to read through those stories and find a winner, but for now, here are a few samples of what some of you did with that sentence.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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2:22pm

Sat March 31, 2012
Music Interviews

The Passionate, Turbulent Life Of James Brown

Originally published on Sun April 1, 2012 6:48 pm

Gotham Books

James Brown used to tell people that even being stillborn as a child couldn't stop him. He rose to the highest heights in the music industry and stayed there longer than most. But in the end he succumbed to atrocious financial planning, a drug habit and a violent temper.

RJ Smith, author of the new biography The One: The Life and Music of James Brown, tells NPR's Guy Raz that Brown believed he was indestructible.

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1:48pm

Sat March 31, 2012
Music Interviews

Noel Gallagher: Flying High After Oasis

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 5:43 pm

Noel Gallagher's first solo album, Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds, came out in October.
Courtesy of the artist

When the song "Wonderwall" hit the airwaves in 1995, Oasis was arguably the biggest rock band in the world. At the heart of the group were two combustible figures: Noel Gallagher, the main songwriter, and his brother Liam, the main singer. With their fiery tempers and frequent public outbursts, the two were on the covers of the tabloids as often as the top of the charts.

Oasis burned out quite suddenly a few years ago, with a now-famous meltdown backstage before a show in Paris.

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