All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
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1:58pm

Thu July 5, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Bull Fights, Bankruptcy And A Damn Dangerous Book

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 6:23 pm

promo image
iStock Photo

Ben Mezrich is the author of Sex on the Moon.

Around the time I turned 12, I figured out exactly what I wanted to be when I grew up: an alcoholic.

I didn't actually know what it meant to be an alcoholic, but I knew that one day, I would drink copious amounts and dash around the streets of Paris, preferably in the company of bullfighters, bankrupts, impotent newspaper correspondents, and morbidly depressed, exotically beautiful divorcees.

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12:18pm

Thu July 5, 2012
Asia

After A Forced Abortion, A Roaring Debate In China

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 11:09 pm

Feng Jianmei and her husband could not pay $6,000 in fines for violating China's one-child policy. In June, when she was seven months pregnant, local officials abducted her and forced her to have an abortion, her family says. The case has provoked widespread outrage.
Quirky China News Rex Features

Deng Jiyuan and Feng Jianmei, a couple from northwest China's Shaanxi province, have a 6-year-old daughter. Under China's complicated birth calculus, they were barred from having another child. But they tried anyway.

"We planned this pregnancy because our parents are old, they want us to have another child," Deng, 30, explained by cellphone last month from his home in Shaanxi.

That decision led to a sequence of events that has ignited a firestorm and renewed debate over the country's one-child policy.

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3:47pm

Wed July 4, 2012
Business

Fear Of Fires Fizzles Some July Fourth Fireworks Fun

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 4:59 pm

Susan Underwood prices fireworks, while her husband Michael (left) and Clint Simmons pace themselves with a snack and TV last month at their tent along Highway 416 in Sevier County, Tenn. Over in Middle Tennessee, the drought has led city leaders to ban fireworks this year.
Curt Habraken AP

Freddie Bowers and his dad, Larry, have sold fireworks in LaVergne, Tenn., for a lifetime. But, the sparklers are off limits this year since the region has had the hottest streak in recorded history and several small fires in the area have been blamed on fireworks.

For people in the fireworks business, Christmas usually comes in July. Only this year, three-quarters of the country are experiencing some level of drought and from the Mountain West to the Southeast, cities are temporarily banning fireworks.

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3:37pm

Wed July 4, 2012
Business

Ex-CEO: Barclays Isn't The Only Bank At Fault

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 5:35 pm

Former Barclays CEO Bob Diamond leaves Parliament amid a crowd of reporters in London on Wednesday. Diamond, who resigned Tuesday, was questioned about a growing interest-rate manipulation scandal.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

The fallen leader of Barclays Bank got on the hot seat before members of the British Parliament on Wednesday. Robert Diamond, an American, resigned Tuesday as CEO of the bank — the latest executive to lose his job over an interest-rate manipulation scandal.

The scandal has not only consumed Barclays, it also threatens to engulf other international banks — and high-ranking government officials, too.

Diamond started his career at Barclays on Independence Day, exactly 16 years ago. On Wednesday in London, he set off some fireworks all his own.

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3:01pm

Wed July 4, 2012
Sports

Baseball's Teen Phenom Steals Home, And Hearts

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 4:03 pm

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper walks out of the clubhouse before an interleague baseball game in Baltimore.
Patrick Semansky AP

Bryce Harper was 16 when he appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, pictured swinging a bat in the desert and declared "Baseball's Chosen One."

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1:55pm

Wed July 4, 2012
Middle East

Medical Marijuana Use Sprouting In Israel

Originally published on Sun July 8, 2012 8:33 am

Moshe Rute smokes cannabis at the Hadarim nursing home in Kibutz Naan, Israel. In conjunction with Israel's Health Ministry, the Tikkun Olam company is distributing cannabis for medicinal purposes to more than 1,800 people in Israel.
Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Israel has become a world leader in the use of medical marijuana. More than 10,000 patients have received government licenses to consume the drug to treat ailments such as cancer and chronic pain.

But while the unorthodox treatment has gained acceptance in Israel, it still has its critics.

Susan Malkah breathes in the cloud of smoke from a plastic inhaler especially formulated for medical marijuana use. She has a number of serious ailments and is confined to a wheelchair.

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12:24pm

Wed July 4, 2012
Arts & Life

The Highwaymen: Segregation And Speed-Painting In The Sunshine State

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 4:03 pm

Courtesy of Gary Monroe

In the 1960s and '70s, if you were in a doctor's office, or a funeral home, or a motel in Florida, chances are a landscape painting hung on the wall. Palms arching over the water, or moonlight on an inlet. Tens of thousands of paintings like this were created by a group of self-taught African-American artists, concentrated in Fort Pierce, Fla.

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12:08pm

Wed July 4, 2012
Science

New Subatomic Particle May Be Physics' 'Missing Link'

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:51 am

This graphic depicts a proton-proton collision from the search for the Higgs boson particle.
CERN AFP/Getty Images

Scientists have discovered a new subatomic particle with profound implications for understanding our universe. On Wednesday, they announced they've found a particle believed to be the long-awaited Higgs boson. Nicknamed the "God particle," it represents the final piece in a theory that explains the basic nature of our universe.

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7:06pm

Tue July 3, 2012
It's All Politics

Did Roberts Flip On The Health Care Decision?

Originally published on Wed July 4, 2012 2:00 pm

Since the Supreme Court's health care ruling, there's been a lot of speculation about whether Chief Justice John Roberts changed his mind during the course of deliberations.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

In the days since the Supreme Court's historic health care ruling, there has been a good deal of speculation about whether Chief Justice John Roberts changed his mind in the course of deliberations, deciding late in the game to uphold the constitutionality of most of the law.

Even before the decision was announced, conservative writers railed that liberals and the so-called mainstream media were trying to intimidate the chief justice.

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6:13pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Planet Money

Does Medicaid Make People Healthier?

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:08 pm

Karen Roach iStockphoto.com

A while back, Robin Boros lost her job, and she and her husband couldn't afford health insurance.

One time, Boros passed out, and her husband called an ambulance.

"The hospital bill, it was atrocious," she says. "We couldn't pay it."

They never figured out why Boros passed out. But after that, she and her husband avoided going to the doctor. At times, she says, she even bought blood pressure medication on the street.

"That was awful," Boros says. "But you do what you got to do."

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5:31pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Latin America

Colombia Relives Escobar's Reign Of Terror, On TV

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:21 pm

The TV series Pablo Escobar: Boss of Evil, starring Andres Parra as the eponymous Colombian drug lord, is revisiting a dark period in the country's history.
Caracol Television

A generation ago, he terrorized Colombia with a wave of bombings and assassinations that nearly brought the state to its knees.

Now, nearly 20 years after Pablo Escobar was shot dead following a long manhunt by Colombian and American agents, the flamboyant chief of the Medellin cocaine cartel is being resurrected by Colombian television.

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4:48pm

Tue July 3, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Bordellos, Bandits And One Big Mississippi Adventure

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:06 pm

cover detail
cover detail

W. Ralph Eubanks is the author of Ever Is a Long Time and The House at the End of the Road. He is director of publishing at the Library of Congress.

The work of William Faulkner looms as a mountain too high to climb for many readers, with his long, complex sentences and shifting point of view. But Faulkner's famously tangled mix of literary techniques meant nothing when I was about 12 years old and picked up a copy of The Reivers.

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4:28pm

Tue July 3, 2012
From Our Listeners

Letters: Kodak, 'Drive A Tank'

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:06 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's time now for your Letters, but first a correction. On Friday, in our weekly chat with sportswriter Stefan Fatsis, we talked about Wimbledon. And during the chat, we incorrectly said that player Andy Murray hailed from England when, in fact, Mr. Murray was born in Scotland.

As listener Bob Carter of Cornelius, North Carolina points out: Calling a Scot an Englishman is as quick a way to a bloody nose as would be confusing a Slovenian and a Slovakian, or a German and an Austrian.

Well, now to your Letters.

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4:04pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Health

Treating HIV: From Impossible To Halfway There

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 2:20 pm

Francois St. Ker, 55, was on the brink of dying from AIDS in the spring of 2001. Today, he's a successful farmer and is in good health, thanks to treatment for his HIV.
John Poole NPR

This story begins 11 years ago. It was a time when many, if not most, experts said it was unthinkable to treat people with AIDS in developing countries using the triple-drug regimens that were routinely saving the lives of patients in wealthier countries.

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3:57pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Regional Coverage

Senator Schumer on federal bath salts ban

US Senator Charles Schumer speaking on legislation to ban bath salts and other similar substances.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The market for a drug that has exploded onto the scene this year could soon be closed.  Federal legislation could help lead to the end of bath salts, synthetic marijuana and other synthetic hallucinogens on the streets today.

US Senator Charles Schumer expects President Obama to sign the legislation that bans bath salts and other deadly synthetic substances.  It's already passed the Senate and the House.

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3:49pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Music Reviews

Serbia's Markovic Orkestar Breaks Boundaries With Brass

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:06 pm

Boban and Marko Markovic are the father and son behind Serbia's Markovic Orkestar.
Michael Mann Courtesy of the artist

If you're planning a wedding, and looking for music that's fresh, irresistible and completely unexpected, you might want to consider The Boban i Marko Markovic Orkestar, a cutting-edge Gypsy brass band from southern Serbia. A new best-of compilation called Golden Horns puts the group's wild, genre-bending flair on full display.

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3:00pm

Tue July 3, 2012
U.S.

Illinois Services Threatened As Pension Hole Grows

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 2:16 pm

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn says the pension system is putting a grip on the state's budget. As a result, other services may lose funding.
Seth Perlman AP

Fallout from the recession continues to hobble state finances, particularly in states crippled by pensions they can't afford to pay.

Chief among them is Illinois, which has racked up the largest unfunded liability in the nation. Politicians there pledge to fix it.

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2:55pm

Tue July 3, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Oakland Turns A Corner As Calif. Faces Budget Woes

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 2:17 pm

Ryan Curtis leans in for a kiss from Love Kovtun on Telegraph Avenue in Oakland's Uptown neighborhood in April. New businesses and investment have helped revitalize the city's downtown over the past decade.
Laura Morton for NPR

The city of Oakland, Calif. has long been associated with crime, poverty, urban decay and, more recently, violent protests tied to the Occupy movement.

So it may have been a surprise to New York Times readers when the newspaper listed Oakland as No. 5 among its top "places to go" in 2012.

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1:12pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Remembrances

Andy Griffith: A TV Icon From Mayberry To 'Matlock'

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:06 pm

In the drama Matlock, Kene Holliday (top left), Nancy Stafford, Julie Sommars, Griffith and Kari Lizer played a criminal defense team that often came out on top.
NBCU Photo Bank

In a career that spanned half a century, actor and comedian Andy Griffith starred in five different television series, made more than 30 movies and even recorded a Grammy Award-winning gospel album. He died Tuesday morning in North Carolina at the age of 86.

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12:07pm

Tue July 3, 2012
Movie Reviews

A Lanky Teenager On The Path To (Super) Power

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:06 pm

Andrew Garfield stars in The Amazing Spider-Man, in which the nerdy, web-slinging superhero gets an overhauled origin story.
Jaimie Trueblood Sony Pictures

I know you're skeptical. Tobey Maguire's Spider-Man was last slinging webs just five years ago. Broadway's Spider-Man started singing about webs less than two years ago. Now here comes another Spider-dude: This Andrew Garfield guy. So he'd better be really something, right? Well, as it happens, he is.

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6:17pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Planet Money

Scandal That Cost Barclays Chairman His Job Threatens To Spread

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 12:24 pm

London-based Barclays Bank agreed to pay a $453 million fine over charges it manipulated the London Interbank Offered Rate — LIBOR — a key global interest rate.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Every day at 11 a.m., a few big banks tell the British Bankers' Association what it costs them to borrow. Out of that comes LIBOR — the London Interbank Offered Rate, a dull but vital interest rate that underpins trillions of dollars of transactions globally, from home mortgages and personal credit cards to major corporate lending.

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5:29pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Election 2012

Obama's 'Clean Coal' Fighting Words To W.Va. Dems

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 11:34 am

A sign outside the Tug Valley Chamber of Commerce in Williamson, W.Va., welcomes visitors to "Hatfield McCoy Country," referring to a legendary family feud that played out in the Appalachians.
Noah Adams NPR

Mingo County, deep in the southwest corner of West Virginia, has sent a "protest vote" to the attention of President Obama. In the May 8 Democratic primary, voters chose a man named Keith Judd to run for president. He got 61 percent of the vote.

Judd won't be available. He's serving a 17-year sentence for extortion. From prison in Texas, he managed to file the papers, pay the fee and get on the West Virginia ballot.

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4:54pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Politics and Government

Buerkle town hall

Ellen Abbott WRVO

A bit of bickering broke out among citizens at Congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle's town hall meeting in DeWitt Monday. But it wasn't even the big issues that caused disagreement.

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4:33pm

Mon July 2, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Filling In New Orleans' Future, One Blank At A Time

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:19 pm

Candy Chang, co-founder of the website Neighborland, writes on an art installation in New Orleans in April. As part of a public street art project that later became Neighborland, Chang put nametag-like stickers on empty New Orleans storefronts for residents to write ideas for improving the city.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

New Orleans became a blank slate after Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005. And ever since, entrepreneurs have rushed in to experiment with new ideas for building and running a city.

Among them is a startup called Neighborland.com, a social media tool for sharing ideas to make your neighborhood better. After signing in to Neighborland, you can find your neighborhood and post your idea. The posts all start with "I want," and you fill in the rest.

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4:33pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Africa

With Problems Egypt, Will Morsi Play Role In Region

Originally published on Sun July 8, 2012 8:31 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The election of Egypt's first Islamist president could alter alliances across the Mideast. Diplomats and analysts are trying to figure out how Egypt's relations with Iran, Israel and other countries may change now that a member of the long-banned Muslim Brotherhood will be leading the country.

From Cairo, NPR's Peter Kenyon has our story.

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3:12pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Afghanistan

Lack Of Electricity Dims Afghan Economic Prospects

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 5:38 pm

Afghanistan produces about half the power it currently uses and imports the other half from neighboring countries. But that total still doesn't meet the country's demands. This photo shows Kabul at night in January.
Jawad Jalali EPA/Landov

Afghanistan desperately needs to jump-start its economy if it hopes to stand on its own after NATO's drawdown in 2014. But there's a major constraint for a country trying to build a modern economy: electricity shortages.

Afghanistan ranks among the countries with the lowest electricity production per capita in the world. Despite billions of dollars in projects over the past decade, at best one-third of the population has access to regular power.

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9:37am

Mon July 2, 2012
The Two-Way

Word Of The Day: 'Derecho'

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:35 pm

Where you're most likely to be in the path of a derecho, and how often.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

We learned a new word on Saturday, thanks to Korva's post about the devastating storm that has left millions without power from Ohio east through the mid-Atlantic states:

Derecho.

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5:05pm

Sun July 1, 2012
Business

An Abbey's Run-In With Law On Who Can Sell Caskets

Originally published on Sun July 1, 2012 5:53 pm

Deacon Mark Coudrain, bottom left, Rev. Charles Benoit, top left, Abbot Justin Brown, top right, and attorney Evans Schmidt carry a casket built by Benedictine monks down the steps of the U.S. federal district courthouse on Aug. 12, 2010.
Patrick Semansky AP

Monks set up St. Joseph Abbey in Louisiana more than 100 years ago. They've been there so long, they have 1,100 acres and their own town, St. Benedict.

For all those years, when one of the brothers died, the monks would painstakingly craft a flawless pine casket in their woodwork shop.

Over the years, many clergy members and high-ranking church officials would request the the beautiful caskets. Soon, members of the public wanted see if they might be able to buy one.

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5:05pm

Sun July 1, 2012
Why Music Matters

Breaking Records To A Velvet Underground Beat

Christian Niccum and Dan Joye at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Whistler, Canada.
Shaun Botterill Getty Images

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with Olympic luger Christian Niccum. Niccum says music was the key to one of his first accomplishments in the sport.

"I was 15 years old, in Berchtesgaden in Germany," he says. "It's the oldest artificial luge track in the world, and it's also the most difficult."

Daunted by the course's many sharp turns, Niccum turned to something borrowed for inspiration.

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4:30pm

Sun July 1, 2012
Music Interviews

Bobby Womack: 'God Must Still Have A Purpose For Me'

Originally published on Sun July 1, 2012 5:05 pm

Bobby Womack's latest album, The Bravest Man in the Universe, came out June 12.
Jamie-James Medina Courtesy of the artist

"We had two shows that night," says Bobby Womack, recounting a recent concert in Houston. "It was a small theater, about 5- or 6,000 people. The second show, I was just out of it; they had to take me to the hospital."

It was a serious scare for the 68-year-old singer-songwriter — who has also lived through drug addiction and the deaths of two sons — and it didn't end that night.

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