All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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2:39pm

Fri June 22, 2012
Music Interviews

Take A Trip To Downtown L.A. With La Santa Cecilia

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 6:50 pm

Singer Marisol Hernandez (center) takes listeners from her grandfather's burro cart to La Santa Cecilia's Latin Grammy Award, on Olvera Street in Los Angeles.
Courtesy of the artist

Named for the patron saint of musicians, La Santa Cecilia has deep roots in the immigrant community of Los Angeles. Yet the band's six members draw inspiration not only from their rich heritage, but also from their everyday lives growing up embedded in American culture.

During a short, recent trip to historic Olvera Street in downtown L.A. — "It's a little street with little shops resembling any town in Mexico or Latin America" — singer Marisol Hernandez describes the hopes and dreams the city represents.

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5:40pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Education

Kids Get Hands-On With Science In A 'Dream Garage'

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 9:09 am

Community Science Workshops give low-income kids around California opportunities to learn about science firsthand — from holding spiders to building robots.
Amy Standen for NPR

Many kids who grow up in big cities have lots of opportunities to experience science hands-on. There are zoos, museums, planetariums and school field trips.

But those amenities are sometimes out of reach for lower-income children. And in some rural areas, those opportunities simply don't exist at all.

In California — as in many states — public school science programs have faced deep budget cuts. Many kids have been left behind.

Dan Sudran has taken it upon himself to help close the gap.

Instilling A Love Of Science, Early On

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5:19pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Around the Nation

A Fight To The Finish For Tennessee Mosque

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 10:34 pm

Construction workers pack up at the end of their workday at the Islamic Center in Murfreesboro, Tenn.
Mark Humphrey AP

The first minarets in Murfreesboro, Tenn., are about to be placed atop a new mosque. But when construction is complete on the new Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, located about 30 miles southeast of Nashville, no one will get to move in.

An ongoing court battle has stalled the project, one of several Islamic centers around the country that, like the so-called ground zero mosque, have encountered resistance from local communities.

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5:19pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Pop Culture

Branding 'Brave': The Cultural Capital Of Princesses

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 1:42 pm

In Brave, the character of Merida is a skilled archer and sword fighter who rebels against what is expected of her as a princess.
Disney/Pixar

For little girls, princesses hold roughly the same value that tulips did for the Dutch back in the 1500s, and that princess mania is sure to get a boost with the new Pixar movie Brave, which stars a Scottish princess named Merida.

For a keyhole glimpse into the pink and glittery world of pre-K princess culture, consider the scene at a recent princess-themed birthday party in a suburb of Washington, D.C.

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5:05pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Movie Reviews

Time In 'To Rome With Love': It Doesn't Make Sense

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 6:19 pm

Antonio the newlywed (Alessandro Tiberi, left), Uncle Paolo (Roberto Della Casa) and Anna the prostitute (Penelope Cruz) in one of To Rome With Love's four independent stories. This one features Anna attempting to teach Antonio something about love.
Philippe Antonello Sony Pictures Classics

For four decades, Woody Allen's been churning out movies at a rate of almost exactly one film per year, a phenomenon that I'd describe as being "like clockwork" if my whole sense of time hadn't been scrambled by his latest comedy, To Rome With Love.

Pleasantly scrambled, but still.

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4:39pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Middle East

In Yemen's Badlands, Al-Qaida Takes To The Hills

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 12:31 pm

A Yemeni army tank fires at positions of al-Qaida militants near the coastal town of Shaqra, Yemen, last week, in a photo provided by Yemen's Defense Ministry. Yemen's army says it has pushed al-Qaida fighters out of towns in the south.
AP

Yemen's offensive against al-Qaida has focused on territory in the south of the country that the militants have held for nearly a year. With the backing of the U.S., Yemen's army has cleared al-Qaida and its allies. But many local residents believe the fight is far from over. Kelly McEvers spent several days in southern Yemen and filed this report.

We're in a Yemeni army land cruiser with a shattered windshield. Our destination is the town of Shaqra, the last town in the al-Qaida badlands before the sandy ground turns into mountains.

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4:39pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Music Interviews

David Byrne Finds A Disco Muse In Imelda Marcos

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 5:19 pm

Musician David Byrne at his rehearsal space at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Mass. Byrne's first musical, Here Lies Love, chronicles the rise and fall of Imelda Marcos.
Andrea Shea NPR

For many, the mention of the Philippines' former first lady Imelda Marcos brings to mind her thousands-strong shoe collection. But the extravagant, ultimately disgraced wife of ousted dictator Ferdinand Marcos makes musician David Byrne think of something different: disco — and power.

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4:22pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Politics and Government

DiNapoli wants Local Development Corporations held accountable

New York's fiscal watchdog wants lawmakers to give his office more power  over economic development organizations that he says are being misused in some cases, by local governments in New York state. Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli has his eye on Local Development Corporations.

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4:02pm

Thu June 21, 2012
It's All Politics

Rubio On Compromise, Immigration And His 'Union Activist' Past

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 5:19 pm

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., delivers a speech during the annual Conservative Political Action Conference in February in Washington.
Win McNamee Getty Images

To hear Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tell it, it's happenstance that his newly published memoir, An American Son, became available just as the speculation about Republican vice presidential possibilities is heating up.

Rubio, a rising Cuban-American star in his party, told NPR's Robert Siegel, co-host of All Things Considered, in a Thursday interview:

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3:08pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Journal Publishes Details On Contagious Bird Flu Created In Lab

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 12:40 pm

Vietnam has contained the fatal bird flu cases that raged in the late 2000s, but it is still struggling with new cases of the virulent disease. Here, a poultry trader loads live chickens onto his motorbike on March 16 at a market outside Hanoi.
Hoang Dinh Ham AFP/Getty Images

Anyone and everyone can now look in the journal Science and read about how to make lab-altered bird flu viruses that have been at the center of a controversy that's raged for months.

But in the eyes of some critics, the details of these experiments are effectively the recipe for a dangerous flu pandemic.

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2:14pm

Thu June 21, 2012
The Salt

California Dairy Farmers Split Over Milk Payments In Farm Bill

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 5:27 pm

A dairy cow peeks out of its stall at Case van Steyn's dairy in Galt, Calif.
Kathleen Masterson NPR

California is known as the land of fruits and nuts, but it also happens to be the country's largest milk-producing state. So it's no surprise that its dairy farmers are front and center in the debate over reforming the milk marketing system, which hasn't really changed much in 30 years.

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2:10pm

Thu June 21, 2012
Mom And Dad's Record Collection

Santigold: 'Blown Away' By Fela Kuti

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 4:30 pm

Santigold's latest album, Master of My Make-Believe, came out in April.
Sean Thomas

All Things Considered continues its "Mom and Dad's Record Collection" series with singer Santi White, who's best known by her stage name, Santigold.

White says her father steered her artistic development by introducing her to the music of Nigerian Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti at a young age.

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6:23pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Economy

Fed Extends 'Operation Twist' — So What Is It?

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, if like me, you're more than a little mystified by Operation Twist, the Federal Reserve policy that's being extended, join me now for a four-minute tutorial. We've got a very classy tutor, economics professor Alan Blinder of Princeton, who is a former Fed vice chairman. Welcome back to the program.

ALAN BLINDER: Thanks very much, Robert.

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6:23pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Energy

Senate Votes To Keep Mercury Limits On Power Plants

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The Senate has narrowly rejected an effort to scrap tough limits on mercury emitted from power plants. The Obama administration has trumpeted the rules affecting coal-burning power plants as an environmental triumph. But to industry groups, and many Republicans, these rules are the latest salvo in a war against coal. NPR's Tamara Keith reports.

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6:23pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Politics

House Cites Attorney General Holder For Contempt

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee voted today to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress. He's accused of refusing to turn over certain documents related to the controversial gun-trafficking operation known as Fast and Furious.

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6:23pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Economy

Federal Reserve Cuts Back U.S. Growth Forecast

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel in Washington, D.C.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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6:23pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Politics

Program On Ariz. Immigration Part News, Advocacy

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The U.S. Supreme Court is getting ready to rule on Arizona's controversial immigration law and a lot of people in that state are watching closely. Tonight, nearly two dozen Spanish language radio and TV stations in Arizona are scheduled to run the same program about the immigration law. As NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports, they're walking a fine line between journalism and advocacy.

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6:23pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Energy

Offline Nuclear Plant Squeezes Energy Access In Calif.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

One power plant in particular is on the minds of many here in Southern California. It's the San Onofre nuclear plant, roughly 60 miles south of Los Angeles. The plant was shut down back in January because of a leak that released a small amount of radioactive steam. It's been off-line ever since. And this week, nuclear regulators called what led to the leak, a significant, serious safety issue.

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5:58pm

Wed June 20, 2012
World

Time At Oxford Spurred Suu Kyi's Burma Activism

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 9:16 pm

Aung San Suu Kyi finally received her honorary degree from Oxford University after it was initially awarded in 1993. In her speech, Suu Kyi praised Oxford for helping her see humankind at its best during her long years under house arrest in Myanmar.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Aung San Suu Kyi would probably not be the symbol of Burma's quest for democracy without her experiences at Oxford University. She studied there in the 1960s and raised a family there in the '70s.

Suu Kyi returned to her alma mater Wednesday to receive the honorary degree she was unable to collect for more than a decade while under house arrest.

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5:33pm

Wed June 20, 2012
History

Pakistan's 'Burushaski' Language Finds New Relatives

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 6:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's like discovering a distant cousin, a really distant cousin. It's like learning that someone you had barely heard of is actually part of the family. In this case, the family is the Indo-European family of languages. And the umpteenth cousin is a language called Burushaski. It's spoken by about 90,000 people, the Burusho people, and nearly all of them live in Pakistan. A few hundred live in India.

Just to give a sense of what it sounds like, here's a joke in Burushaski that we came across online.

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5:33pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Food

Pizza Coalition Protests Menu Labeling Proposal

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 6:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: Well, actually, in Washington...

BLOCK: Where franchisee meets lawmaker...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIEGEL: Yes, that's right. Some of the nation's largest pizza chains are lobbying on Capitol Hill to deliver a piping hot message.

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5:28pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Politics

Economy One Of Biggest Issues For Latino Voters

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 6:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Immigration is, of course, an issue of concern to all Americans, but it's of special concern to Latinos. As David Welna just reported, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials - or NALEO - is holding its annual convention in Orlando. Mitt Romney will speak to the group tomorrow, about his views on immigration policy. And the other headlining speakers? President Obama, Jeb Bush, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis and Sen. Marco Rubio are all likely to address the issue.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:14pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Around the Nation

Saving Calif. State Parks: The End Of Public Funding?

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 6:23 pm

Brad Beadell (right) takes his 11-year-old son, William, on his first backpacking trip through Henry W. Coe State Park in Morgan Hill, Calif.
Melissa Block NPR

On July 1, 15 California state parks are slated to be closed permanently to the public — the first such closures in the state's history. They're the victim of budget cuts in a state with a $16 billion shortfall.

Over the past year, park enthusiasts have scrambled to save dozens of parks from closure, including Henry W. Coe State Park, California's second-biggest state park, located about 30 miles south of San Jose.

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3:55pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Regional Coverage

Federal goverment provides grants to local health centers

Three community health centers in central and northern New York are receiving grants from the federal government as part of the federal health care law.

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2:53pm

Wed June 20, 2012
Regional Coverage

The Roman Catholic Church plans "Fortnight for Freedom"

The Roman Catholic Church is using the two weeks running up to the Fourth of July for prayer and advocacy as it continues it's fight against the federal Health and Human Services Department mandate that would force some Catholic institutions to provide health insurance coverage that includes contraception.

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12:58pm

Wed June 20, 2012
The Salt

Seattle Forager Inspires Others To Learn About Wild, Forgotten Foods

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 9:17 pm

Langdon Cook shows off the morel and porcini mushrooms he's foraged and stored in the trunk of his car.
Martin Kaste NPR

For Langdon Cook, a walk in the woods isn't that different from a walk through the produce section of the supermarket. He's a writer, blogger and all-around outdoorsy type, but in outdoorsy Seattle, he's made his name primarily as a forager.

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6:59pm

Tue June 19, 2012
Education

Board Member Resigns After U.Va. President Fired

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block at NPR West, in California.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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6:55pm

Tue June 19, 2012
U.S.

Senators Get Time In Solitary Confinement

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 6:59 pm

An exercise area for inmates in solitary confinement in California's Pelican Bay prison. Inmates are allowed to leave their windowless cells for 2 1/2 hours daily to exercise and bathe.
Michael Montgomery Center for Investigative Reporting

At any given moment, about 15,000 men and women are living in solitary confinement in the federal prison system, housed in tiny cells not much larger than a king-sized bed.

"It is hard to describe in words what such a small space begins to look like, feel like and smell like when someone is required to live virtually their entire life in it," says Craig Haney, a psychologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

But Tuesday, Haney, who has studied life inside prisons for three decades, had an opportunity to paint that picture.

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6:22pm

Tue June 19, 2012
Energy

Shell Faces Pushback As Alaska Drilling Nears

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 6:59 pm

Shell says it hopes to never need to use its new 300-foot-long, $100 million oil recovery ship named Nanuq for anything other than drills and training.
Richard Harris NPR

The federal government could soon give the final go-ahead for Royal Dutch Shell to begin drilling for oil in the Arctic Ocean. Shell has spent $4 billion since 2007 to prepare for this work, and is hoping to tap into vast new deposits of oil.

But the plan to drill exploratory wells is controversial — opposed by environmental groups and some indigenous people as well.

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6:22pm

Tue June 19, 2012
Law

Senate Holds First Hearing On Solitary Confinement

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 6:31 pm

Advocates for prisoners rights say too many inmates spend years in solitary confinement — in violation of the constitutional bar against cruel and unusual punishment. Today, they persuaded the U.S. Senate to hold the first hearing on the issue, as state and federal prison systems fend off new lawsuits over the practice.

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