All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
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8:21pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

All Routine PSA Tests For Prostate Cancer Should End, Task Force Says

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:33 pm

Terry Dyroff, at home in Silver Spring, Md., got a PSA blood test that led to a prostate biopsy. The biopsy found no cancer, but it gave him a life-threatening infection.
Jose Luis Magana AP

There they go again — those 17 federally appointed experts at the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force are telling American doctors and patients to stop routinely doing lifesaving tests.

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6:22pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Medical Treatments

Task Force: Men Don't Need Regular Prostate Tests

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 7:00 pm

A federal task force has concluded that men over 50 don't need a regular blood test for prostate cancer. Millions of men get the test every year. The task force says too many unnecessary treatments are being performed because of the test.

4:40pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Health

Technology could be key in allowing CNY residents an equal chance at healthy lives

There is a difference of up to 33 years of life expectancy depending on where you live in Central New York and there is no simple answer to creating equal health for all.

Economics, race and gender all figure into these health disparities but technology could play a major part in closing the healthcare gap found between many Americans.

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4:18pm

Mon May 21, 2012
Poetry

NewsPoet: Carmen Gimenez Smith's Day In Verse

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 11:30 am

Carmen Gimenez Smith visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Monday.
Claire O'Neill NPR

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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5:49pm

Sun May 20, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 8 Winner Is...

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:51 pm

iStockphoto.com

The end of Round 8 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest has finally arrived. With help from our readers at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, New York University, the University of Oregon and the University of Texas, at Austin, we've read through more than 6,000 stories.

Submissions had to be original works of short fiction — no more than 600 words. They also had to begin with this sentence: "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally, decided to walk through the door."

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5:17pm

Sun May 20, 2012
Health

Vets Return With Brain Injuries Oft Seen In Football

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just tuning in, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Here's a terrible statistic: Once a veteran is home from Iraq or Afghanistan, he or she is more likely to die by suicide than from injuries sustained in the combat theater. There is new research that suggests those injuries may actually be contributing to the suicides.

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2:59pm

Sun May 20, 2012
Music Interviews

Adam Lambert: 'I Want To Sing It Big'

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 5:19 pm

Adam Lambert's second studio album is entitled Trespassing.
Courtesy of the artist

Adam Lambert captivated America in 2009 when he almost won American Idol. Lambert was brash, likable and glamorous, but he soon became better known for being the first openly gay Idol contender.

Though Lambert finished as the runner-up, his popularity and talent won him a recording deal. He released his second studio album, Trespassing, this week — just a few months after his 30th birthday.

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3:17pm

Sat May 19, 2012
Music Interviews

John Mayer: Restoring An Image, And An Instrument

Originally published on Sat May 19, 2012 6:18 pm

John Mayer's new album, his first since a 2010 controversy that sent him retreating from the spotlight, is called Born and Raised.
Courtesy of the artist

John Mayer is one of the biggest-selling artists of the last decade — and with love interests like Jessica Simpson and Jennifer Aniston, one of its most pursued by the media. In 2010, he gave a pair of interviews to Rolling Stone and Playboy that shocked readers with sexually aggressive and racially insensitive language. Mayer seemed to be self-destructing in full view of his fans.

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6:34pm

Fri May 18, 2012
Remembrances

Baritone Fischer-Diskau Was One Of Opera's Greatest

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 11:51 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we briefly note the passing of one of the world's great opera singers: German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau died today. He was 86. From his first recital in Berlin in 1947 until his retirement in 1992, Fischer-Dieskau is in demand at opera houses and concert halls the world over. He was especially known for his interpretations of Schubert songs, like this one from the song cycle "Winterreise" or "Winter Journey."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WINTERREISE")

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6:08pm

Fri May 18, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Let The Real Space Age Begin

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 7:14 pm

The Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket stands ready for launch at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
John Raoux AP

It was almost one year ago that the space shuttle Atlantis rose into the sky on a pillar of flame for the last time. The shuttle program ended forever with that mission. American astronauts were left to hitch rides on Russian space capsules, and American kids were left with no tangible direction forward for their dreams of a high-tech, space-happy future.

Tomorrow morning, the unmanned Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral so that supplies can reach the space station.

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3:23pm

Fri May 18, 2012
Movie Reviews

Coming Soon — To A Theater Nowhere Near You

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 6:34 pm

A scene from Battleship, which opens this weekend in the U.S. Thanks to earlier releases abroad, the film has already grossed $215 million worldwide.
ILM/Universal Pictures

The movie Battleship, based on the popular board game, opens today in the U.S. In most respects, it's a typical popcorn picture — the kind of effects-laden action movie that audiences often turn into a summer blockbuster.

And while it may not be any good, it is undeniably ours — American from the water up: a Universal Studios picture about an alien invasion, crammed with special effects from Industrial Light and Magic and set largely on American warships.

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1:25pm

Fri May 18, 2012
Planet Money

California's Facebook Windfall

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 11:21 am

Mark Zuckerberg is, among many other things, the highest-profile taxpayer on the planet today.

After today's Facebook IPO, Zuckerberg will owe nearly $200 million in California state taxes alone. That's "among the largest tax liabilities that a single individual has ever paid at a given point in time," says Jason Sisney of the California State Budget Legislative Analyst's Office.

Zuckerberg's profits will be taxed at a 10% rate in California. That's a much higher rate than in many other states.

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7:16pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Law

New Documents Released In Trayvon Martin Case

Documents have been released in the investigation of George Zimmerman's shooting of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch captain, shot Martin, an unarmed teen. He's claiming self-defense. Robert Siegel talks to Greg Allen.

5:05pm

Thu May 17, 2012
The Record

The Many Voices Of Donna Summer

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:36 pm

"Queen of Disco" Donna Summer performs in 1979. (Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Pop singer Donna Summer, whose long career began in the 1960s and reached its apex in the disco era of the '70s, died of cancer on Thursday at her home in Naples, Florida. Summer was 63 years old. According to Billboard magazine, the singer born LaDonna Gaines had 32 singles that charted in the Hot 100. Fourteen of them made it into the top 10. To hear Sami Yenigun's appreciation of Donna Summer's life and career, as heard on All Things Considered, click the audio link.

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4:45pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Music News

Cecil Taylor: The Pianist Who's Also An Orchestra

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 7:16 pm

Cecil Taylor, 83, is being feted in a two-week celebration of his music in New York City.
Peter Gannushkin downtownmusic.net

When you hear Cecil Taylor perform, you never forget it. He's a force of nature at the piano, with a furious attack and a sound all his own.

"His piano is an orchestra," says Ben Ratliff, music critic for The New York Times. "Cecil has been with us for so long. And every once in a while he does these amazing, galvanizing solo piano performances. And you go see them, and you think, like, 'Wow. What was that? That was amazing.' And I can't get that anywhere else in the world. And that's unique."

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4:05pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Opinion

Two Gray Titles, One Sexy Mix Up

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:46 pm

iStockphoto

Ruta Sepetys is the author of Between Shades of Gray.

"You are an erotic phenomenon."

That's what the stranger seated next to me on the plane whispered. We had exchanged the basic bios of airline chitchat, and he had inquired about the title of my recent book.

"Erotic phenomenon, oh no, that's not me," I quickly tried to explain.

"Well, OK, it's not really you. It's your character. That's what you tell people," grinned the stranger.

That's not what I tell people.

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4:00pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Utica Psych Center

Utica residents try to save psychiatric center

Utica area lawmakers, activists  and residents are trying to save the Mohawk Valley Psychiatric Center.  The community is galvanizing its support of the facility, which has been in the area for over a century.

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3:21pm

Thu May 17, 2012
The Salt

The Secret Life Of California's World-Class Strawberries

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 7:16 pm

Strawberry research fields in Watsonville, Calif.
courtesy California Strawberry Commission

May is the month we see strawberries explode in the market. There are strawberry festivals in every corner of the nation celebrating the juicy ruby beauties, and Strawberry Queens crowned galore. Those traditional harvest time festivals make us think our strawberries are mostly grown on the farm just down the road.

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6:30pm

Wed May 16, 2012
Remembrances

Chuck Brown, 'Go-Go' Funk Pioneer, Dies

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 7:34 pm

The man known as the Godfather of Go-Go has died. Chuck Brown pioneered a musical style of percussion-heavy funk that was born in Washington, D.C. Brown died at age 75 after suffering from pneumonia. Robert Siegel has this remembrance.

4:45pm

Wed May 16, 2012
Regional Coverage

Cuomo visits Syracuse to fight for those with special needs and disabilities

Governor Andrew Cuomo came to Syracuse today to promote his legislation for protecting people with special needs and disabilities.

The legislation creates a center which would have primary responsibility for investigating allegations of abuse and neglect of disabled people in state operated or licensed facilities. Last year there were 10,000 such allegations.

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4:15pm

Wed May 16, 2012
Regional Coverage

Laurie Fine accuses ESPN of libel

Laurie Fine speaking in Geneva
Ellen Abbott

The wife of former Syracuse University basketball coach Bernie Fine is suing ESPN. Laurie Fine accused the sports network of libel in a news conference at a resort in Geneva today.

Fine, flanked by her two daughters, a son-in-law and nephew, told reporters that her life was destroyed after ESPN covered allegations that her husband had sexually abused two ball boys.

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3:33pm

Wed May 16, 2012
Planet Money

For $75, This Guy Will Sell You 1,000 Facebook 'Likes'

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 1:48 pm

How much for that thumb?
Paul Sakuma AP

Looking to get more popular on Facebook? Alex Melen will sell you 1,000 "likes" for about $75.

Melen runs an Internet marketing company. About six months ago, companies he worked with started coming to him more and more with a simple problem: They had created pages on Facebook, but nobody had clicked the "like" button.

"You would go there, and there would be two likes," Melen says. "And one of them would be the owner. And people right away lost interest in the brand."

For the right price, Melen can fix that.

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7:32pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Remembrances

Carlos Fuentes Was A 'Renaissance Man'

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One of Mexico's greatest writers has died: Carlos Fuentes. He was 83. Fuentes was a central figure in the Latin American literary boom of the 1960s and '70s. And he was publishing fiction and essays until the end, including an essay published today in the Mexican newspaper Reforma. I'm joined by Ilan Stavans, professor of Latino Studies at Amherst College. And, Professor Stavans, give us a sense of the broad sweep of Fuentes' career and what made his work so important.

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5:46pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Remembrances

Remembering Mexican Writer Carlos Fuentes

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One of Mexico's greatest writers has died: Carlos Fuentes. He was 83. Fuentes was a central figure in the Latin American literary boom of the 1960s and '70s. And he was publishing fiction and essays until the end, including an essay published today in the Mexican newspaper Reforma. Our own book critic Alan Cheuse knew Fuentes and reviewed many of his novels. Hi, Alan.

ALAN CHEUSE, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

SIEGEL: And first, give us a sense of the broad sweep of Carlos Fuentes' career, and what made his work so important?

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4:16pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Monkey See

Home Video Picks: 'Being John Malkovich'

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 5:46 pm

John Cusack and Cameron Diaz in Being John Malkovich.
Criterion Collection

Time now for a home viewing recommendation from our film critic Bob Mondello. This time Bob urges taking the plunge from the seven-and-a-half-th floor into the Criterion Collection's Blu-ray release of Being John Malkovich.

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4:01pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Planet Money

Is Facebook Worth $100 Billion?

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 12:56 pm

Paul Sakuma AP

When Facebook goes public this week, the company will be valued at roughly $100 billion.

It will be the highest valuation ever for an initial public offering of a tech company. Is Facebook really worth this much money?

One way to frame the question is to consider a single fraction.

The number on top of the fraction is the total value of the company. The number on the bottom is the company's profits over the past year. This fraction is called the price-to-earnings ratio. It's widely used by investors in stocks.

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3:28pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Regional Coverage

Gillibrand calls for oversight and transparency in the banking sector

Ryan Delaney

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says J.P. Morgan Chase's recent bad investment again shows a need for more oversight and transparency in the nation's banking sector.

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3:15pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Music Reviews

Lisa Marie Presley: Rock's Princess Finds Her Voice

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 8:21 pm

Lisa Marie Presley has weathered personal storms with grace. On her new album, she establishes her own distinct identity.
Troy Paul

Lisa Marie Presley is a curiosity. Famous from birth, she is rock's only real princess. Her face is a stunning combination of her parents' best features. Her marriages have been, well, unusual. Who could forget her awkward television kiss with then-husband Michael Jackson? Or the few months of wedded bliss to actor and Elvis fanatic Nicolas Cage? She has led a colorful life — one that overshadowed her music career when she started making records in 2003.

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2:32pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Regional Coverage

Remembering fallen members of the police force

Matt Johnston

It was a day of remembrance today in Syracuse at the newly renovated Forman Park. Mayor Stephanie Miner, Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler, and Onondaga County Sheriff Kevin Walsh were all on hand to honor members of the police force that have fallen in the line of duty.

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5:13pm

Mon May 14, 2012
Asia

India Debates Re-Banning Homosexuality

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 5:44 pm

India's Supreme Court is now weighing arguments by opponents and proponents of legal homosexuality. Same-sex relationships were decriminalized in 2009, but a number of political, social and religious groups are fighting to reinstate a colonial-era law that punished homosexual acts with prison time. Public health workers say legal recognition of India's gay community is critical in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

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