All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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5:17pm

Mon December 12, 2011
Opinion

For Nervous Seniors, Some Pre-Graduation Advice

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 6:33 pm

istockphoto.com

Mitchell Zuckoff is a professor at Boston University and the author of Lost in Shangri-La.

I taught my last class of the semester the other day. Inevitably, my students — all of them journalism majors and most of them seniors — hijacked the lesson plan to vent their hopes and fears about what awaits them after graduation.

This happens every December, and each year I do my best to calm and encourage them, to let them know it's OK to be worried but it's not OK to despair. I give them what I've come to consider my pre-commencement address.

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3:00pm

Mon December 12, 2011
NPR Story

WSJ's Ante Discusses 'Flash Sale' Sites

Melissa Block speaks with Spencer Ante, deputy bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal, about "flash sale" websites. The sites give bargain hunters a chance to buy high-end goods for low-end prices.

3:00pm

Mon December 12, 2011
NPR Story

A Log Cabin In An Unlikely Place

Gerald Brady's neighborhood in Arabi, La., was devastated by Katrina. It's still mostly empty lots and the few homes around are made of brick. Brady's house — a log cabin built on eight-foot-high concrete piers — stands out so much that tourists come around to take pictures. He fought hard to build the unlikely house of his dreams in a most unusual place.

5:36pm

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Baylor's Griffin Wins Heisman

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 10:57 am

Transcript

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: And now, the moment we've been waiting for. It is my pleasure to announce that the 2011 winner of the Heisman Trophy is Robert Griffin III, RG3.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

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5:36pm

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Remembering Jerry Robinson, Creator Of The Joker

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 10:57 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: I do believe it's that arch-criminal the Joker.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Flags are flying at half-staff in Gotham City right now. Jerry Robinson, widely considered to be the creator of Batman's iconic enemy the Joker died this past week.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "BATMAN BEYOND")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (as the Joker) That's not funny.

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2:57pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Author Interviews

Shimon Peres' Book Honors Israel's Founding Father

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 12:07 pm

Shimon Peres, the Nobel Peace laureate and President of Israel, was just 23 years old when he became a trusted aid to his country's founding prime minister, David Ben-Gurion.

He's not sure why Ben-Gurion put so much faith in someone so young. "Maybe he was wrong, maybe it was a mistake," Peres tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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1:40pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Clouds, Concertos And A Trip To Fiji: New Classical Albums

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 3:07 pm

Cloud and Light, by Tshio Hosokawa, was written for the ancient Japanes instrument called the sho.
ECM

With all the chatter about the death of the compact disc, anxiety in the recording industry and the domination of downloads, the flood of CDs overflowing my mailbox never seems to recede. Need a new Bruckner 4th, an Adès anthology or piano music by Pärt? How about Azerbaijani concertos, Schubert sonatas or a new Midsummer Night's Dream?

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7:00pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Economy

Just What Do The Rich Have That's Taxable?

Venture capitalist Nick Hanauer says he and other wealthy Americans should pay their fair share in order to give the middle class tax relief. Hanauer is also the author of The Gardens Of Democracy.
Second Avenue Partners

In a lot of ways, Nick Hanauer is just like many Americans. He lives in Seattle with his wife and two children, and he grew up working in the family business, manufacturing pillows and comforters.

But recently, Hanauer wrote an opinion piece for Bloomberg News that was a plea to the government: "Please tax me more."

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4:50pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Music Interviews

Christian McBride: Tackling Two Sides Of Jazz At Once

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 1:20 pm

Jazz bassist Christian McBride has just released two albums — a set of intimate duets called Conversations with Christian and a big-band affair called The Good Feeling.
Courtesy of the artist

In jazz, to be a bassist usually means playing in someone else's band. The bassist-as-bandleader is a fairly rare thing, with the torch being passed over the years from Charles Mingus to Ron Carter ... and now to Philadelphia-born Christian McBride.

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3:00pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Analysis

Week In News: Plan To Save Eurozone Takes A Hit

Originally published on Sat December 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

PRIME MINISTER DAVID CAMERON: Britain is out of it and will remain out of it. Other countries are in it and are having to make radical changes, including giving up sovereignty to try and make it work.

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3:00pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Asia

Russians Protest Amid Alleged Election Fraud

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 6:50 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

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3:00pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Europe

Nobel Peace Prize Accepted By 3 Women

Originally published on Sat December 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

For the first time in history, an Arab woman has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. At a ceremony in Oslo, Norway today, Tawakkul Karman, known as the mother of Yemen's democratic revolution, shared the 2011 prize with two Liberian women: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Leymah Gbowee, who helped lead the protests that ousted former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

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3:00pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Politics

GOP Hopefuls Ready For Debate In Iowa

Originally published on Sat December 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Turning now to domestic politics. The Iowa caucuses are just about three weeks away now. Herman Cain is gone. Newt Gingrich is the new front-runner. And Mitt Romney is slipping somewhat in the polls. Meanwhile, the attacks among the GOP contenders are getting sharper. And against that backdrop, there's another debate tonight. This one at Drake University in Des Moines.

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3:00pm

Sat December 10, 2011
Economy

Moving On Up More Difficult In America

A new study shows that it is more difficult to "move up" in America than other developed countries. In America, kids are more likely to stay at the bottom of the economic ladder if their parents had low socio- economic status. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks with Erin Currier, manager of the Economic Mobility Project of the Pew Charitable Trusts, about why the U.S. ranked worst for economic mobility among the countries in the study.

3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
Economy

Maryland County Rethinks The Shopping Mall

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The shopping mall is in trouble. That fixture of the suburban landscape has been hit hard by the recession. Even as business picks up, malls must compete with the rush to shop online.

NPR's Larry Abramson takes us to one shopping mall that's trying to escape the dustbin of retail history.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
Europe

Britain Skeptical About Euro

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More insular than ever - so says the French newspaper Le Mon, and it was referring to Britain and that country's decision not to join the effort to forge a new European pact. Today, nearly every European leader expressed support for that pact, but not the British prime minister, David Cameron. NPR's Philip Reeves explains.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
National Security

Questions Surround FBI Agent's Disappearance

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary. The family of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in Iran, is appealing for his return.

DAVID LEVINSON: My name is David Levinson, and I'm speaking on behalf of my mother, Christine Levinson, and my entire family. Please tell us your demands so we can work together to bring my father home safely.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
Technology

A Look At Mobile Technology Used In Retail

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Here's another challenge for traditional retailers. Companies like Amazon and eBay now offer apps for your Smartphone that take a lot of the legwork out of comparison-shopping. While you're in a store, just take a picture of an item or scan the barcode on the box. You'll find out where else to get it and you might even get an extra discount for buying it on the spot.

Stephen Hoch teaches marketing at the Wharton School of Business and consults for some retailers.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

Congress Pushes Bills To Promote Cybersecurity

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The House of Representatives has fast-tracked legislation meant to detect and stop Internet attacks. Last week, the House Intelligence Committee approved a bill that allows companies to share information about the traffic moving across their networks - maybe too much information, according to some privacy advocates who are worried about the bill.

Here's NPR's Martin Kaste.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers believes America is under attack.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

Brennan Discusses National Defense Authorization Bill

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 runs hundreds of pages. It authorizes hundreds of billions in defense spending. And as it stands, the version of the bill approved by the Senate is facing a veto by President Obama.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: Stilts; 'People's Mic'; Backseat Book Club

Robert Siegel and Lynn Neary read emails from listeners.

3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

Baseball Faces Busy Off-Season

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Time for some hot stove baseball now. Yes. Even in chilly December, there's still reason to talk about the nation's pastime. For instance, one of baseball's biggest stars is changing uniforms.

Albert Pujols is leaving the World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals. He's been with the Cards for 11 seasons and two World Series rings, but money talks and Pujols is on his way to L.A. and the other league. He'll be playing for the Angels.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

Ron Paul Surges In Iowa Polls

Ron Paul is surging in the polls — at least in Iowa — reflecting the implosion of other candidates, his memorable debate performances and eclectic libertarian positions. He's for ending the wars — as well as what he calls the "socialist big government." What is his role in the GOP nomination race? Who is he hurting and helping? Could he conceivably win the nomination? Does he want to be president?

3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

E.U. Moves Ahead With Economic Reforms Package

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary. European officials are moving ahead today with a new package of economic reforms. That's after a long night of talks in Brussels. The effort to address the unyielding debt crisis has threatened European unity and one important country, the United Kingdom, has refused to sign off on the reforms. More on that in a moment, but first we hear about the new rules from NPR's Jim Zarroli.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
NPR Story

Romney Returns To Iowa

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Mitt Romney was also in Iowa today. His campaign has spent the past several days on the offensive against Newt Gingrich. As Iowa Public Radio's Kate Wells reports, the former Massachusetts governor is facing a bigger challenge than he planned.

KATE WELLS, BYLINE: Remember when Mitt Romney wasn't supposed to really need Iowa?

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

MITT ROMNEY: Thank you, Tom. Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
World

U.S. Faces Financial Troubles As Egypt Needs Aid

The U.S. has poured $28 billion of economic assistance into Egypt in recent decades. But now when Egypt's needs are the greatest, the U.S. and Europe are cash strapped. The Obama administration is trying to quickly reprogram aid to make sure it helps bolster democratic forces in the country and creates jobs to help ease the country's transition. The International Monetary Fund's chief Christine Lagarde says her door is open as well, but countries like Egypt need to ask for aid, which does come with some conditions. Meanwhile, leading members of Congress say the U.S.

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3:00pm

Fri December 9, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Economy; GOP Primary Race

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

And it's time now for our weekly talk on politics. And joining me are our regular political observers, columnists E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times. Hello, to both of you.

DAVID BROOKS: How do you do?

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

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4:38pm

Thu December 8, 2011
NPR Story

Apple, Publishing Houses Face Antitrust Probe

Originally published on Thu December 8, 2011 10:08 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

The European Union may be in the middle of its biggest crisis ever, but that doesn't mean it's overlooking the small stuff - international competition over the sale of eBooks, for example. The E.U.'s executive body, the European Commission, is investigating Apple and five major publishers for possible antitrust violations relating to the pricing of eBooks. The U.S. Justice Department is also investigating the publishers and Apple, for possible anti-competitive practices.

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4:38pm

Thu December 8, 2011
NPR Story

Shootings Reported At Virginia Tech

Lynn Neary speaks with Lerone Graham, reporter for the Roanoke Times, for the latest about reported shootings on the campus of Virginia Tech.

4:13pm

Thu December 8, 2011
Music News

A Giant Theremin Is Watching You Down Under

Originally published on Thu December 8, 2011 10:08 pm

The Giant Theremin emits not only tones but also some prerecorded musical sounds.
Courtesy of the artist

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