All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

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3:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Politics

Congress Passes Extension Of Payroll Tax Cut

Both houses of Congress approved an extension of President Obama's signature payroll tax cut through the end of the year, two weeks before the actual deadline.

4:18pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Election 2012

In Arizona, Romney Can't Take Mormons For Granted

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 6:41 pm

Karen Johnson, from Linden, Ariz., supports the candidacy of Ron Paul. She says Mitt Romney shares her faith, but not her politics.
Peter O'Dowd For NPR

The wind howls on a blustery Sunday morning in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona, as well-dressed families pull into the parking lot of a Mormon church.

Mormon pioneer roots run more than a century deep in this part of the state, an isolated spot between two Indian reservations.

Karen Johnson is among the Mormon faithful, passionate about God and country.

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4:13pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Election 2012

In One Maine County, Every Caucus Vote May Count

Washington County, Maine, is not a place for unhardy souls.

It's the easternmost county in all of New England, and one of the poorest. And at this time of year, people in Down East Maine do anything they can to eke out a living.

"I get about six months out of it," county resident Hartley Goston said, referring to his lobster boat, The Darian Sue. "I get a few odd jobs here and there to help tie up some loose ends."

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12:00pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Planet Money

Is China An Economic Miracle, Or A Bubble Waiting To Pop?

Originally published on Fri February 17, 2012 12:18 pm

This can't go on forever.
Jacob Goldstein NPR

China's economy sailed through the financial crisis unscathed — at least in the short run.

When the global crisis hit, the country's government-owned banks started lending out lots more money. The money came largely from the savings accounts of ordinary Chinese people. It went largely to finance big construction projects, which helped keep China's economy growing.

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5:33pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Undefeated' Filmmakers Talk Friday Nights' Fights

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 3:15 pm

North Memphis' Manassas Tigers Coach Bill Courtney and player O.C. Brown stand on the sidelines in a scene from the Oscar-nominated documentary Undefeated.
Weinstein Co.

By 2009, after years of losses, the all-black football team at Manassas High School in inner-city North Memphis, Tenn., was known as 'Whipping Boy Manassas' — one of the worst teams in the entire state. The new documentary Undefeated, recently nominated for an Oscar, captures the team's following season, and the struggles of its coach and players, on and off the field.

Co-directors Dan Lindsay and T.J. Martin describe the team's recent history.

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3:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
NPR Story

Letters: On Aleksey Igudesman And Hyung-ki Joo

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel read emails from listeners about violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo.

5:24pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Food

Corn Prices Making Life Difficult For N.D. Bees

The northern plains, especially the Dakotas, are home to about half of the country's honey bee hives during the summer. It's been a good place for bees because they can gather nectar and pollen from so many wildflowers. But the landscape of the area is becoming less bee-friendly, and the consequences could be felt as far away as the almond groves of California, which depend on those same bees for pollination.

5:08pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Asia

A Primer On China's Military

Melissa Block speaks with Eric Heginbotham — senior political scientist at RAND — about China's military capability today, how it's developed over time and what the Chinese make of ramped-up attention from the US.

4:09pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Music Reviews

Dr. Dog: A Standout Among Stereotypes

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 6:16 pm

Dr. Dog's sixth studio album is titled Be the Void.
Chris Crisman

Sometimes I wonder: Do the members of young indie-rock bands know that they're walking stereotypes? There's the scruffy dude who's obsessed with everything vintage and analog, the Pavement-worshiping, whiny-voiced lead singer, the rhythm section that knows its way around every oddity recorded by The Kinks. That's pretty much how I pegged the Philadelphia sextet Dr.

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3:02pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Winter Songs

A Skating Rink's 'Ribbon In The Sky'

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 6:16 pm

hey.kiddo via Flickr

6:16pm

Mon February 13, 2012
It's All Politics

What Would The GOP Candidates Do With The Federal Budget? A Look At Their Plans

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 7:06 pm

A sign on a car window at a Feb. 2 rally for Ron Paul in Elko, Nev.
Ted S. Warren AP

It goes without saying that the men who are vying for the Republican presidential nomination found serious flaws with the budget plan President Obama released Monday. But it got us thinking that this might also be a good time to dig into the budget plans offered by the GOP candidates.

All of the candidates want to cut government spending and balance the federal budget. They also want to cut taxes.

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6:10pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Music

The Ballad Of The Tearful: Why Some Songs Make You Cry

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 5:45 pm

Adele won the song of the year category at this year's Grammy Awards for her tear-jerker "Someone Like You."
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Note: A number of listeners responded to this story and said the definition of appoggiatura was incorrect. Music commentator Rob Kapilow has a second opinion here.

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4:44pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Music Videos

Igudesman And Joo: 'I Will Survive'

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:29 pm

Doriane Raiman NPR

Violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo believe that classical music should be fun. That's why they subvert it whenever they appear on stage.

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1:32pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Three Books...

3 Biting Books For Those Bitter On Valentine's Day

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 10:54 am

Nate iStockphoto.com

For those who find themselves alone this Valentine's Day, or who reject the holiday altogether, you might not want to read about star-crossed lovers pining for each other and — even worse — winding up together in the end. So here are three alternatives to comfort you this Feb 14. Each novel is just the right length to read in a single night with a box of drugstore-bought chocolates. And although these tales are indeed reflections on love, the characters they follow are skeptics.

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3:59pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Author Interviews

When The Bankers Plotted To Overthrow FDR

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 8:08 am

The Plots Against the President

It was a dangerous time in America: The economy was staggering, unemployment was rampant and a banking crisis threatened the entire monetary system.

The newly elected president pursued an ambitious legislative program aimed at easing some of the troubles. But he faced vitriolic opposition from both sides of the political spectrum.

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3:51pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Science

Virtual Penguins A Prescription For Pain?

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 3:44 pm

Snow World was designed specifically with burn patients in mind-- its icy river and comical snowmen are the furthest thing imaginable from fire.
Ari Hollander Hunter Hoffman

For troops injured in Iraq and Afghanistan, the deepest physical pain often comes much later — weeks, or even months, after the incident. That was the case for Sam Brown, whose story appears in this month's GQ magazine.

Brown graduated from West Point in 2006. In the late summer of 2008, he was deployed to southern Afghanistan to lead a platoon. He did security for base construction and made sure the local villagers had enough food, water, and medicine.

It was hot, often mind-numbingly dull, and dusty.

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3:00pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Latin America

American's Arrest In Cuba Could Have Impact

A U.S. contractor working to provide Internet service to Cuba's small Jewish community was charged with spying and sentenced to 15 years in a Cuban prison. Alan Gross was reportedly working for the U.S. Agency for International Development.

12:51pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

From Hyperpianos To Harmonious Handel: New Classical Albums

Lisa Smirnova studied Handel's suites for five years before recording them.
ECM

What's the saying — the more things change, the more they stay the same? It seems that's how it goes in the ways we make music. MIT futurologist Tod Machover rethinks traditional instruments, coming up with new things like the hyperpiano; Pianist Michael Chertock gives it a go in an explosive excerpt below.

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9:15pm

Sat February 11, 2012
The Record

Whitney Houston: Her Life Played Out Like An Opera

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:32 pm

Whitney Houston performs in 1988.
David Corio Getty Images

3:00pm

Sat February 11, 2012
Around the Nation

Hard Times Familiar in Okfuskee County, Okla.

Okfuskee County in Oklahoma is the birthplace of Woody Guthrie, who would have turned 100 this year. Much of the economic problems Guthrie sang about were from what he saw in the county, which was once the largest all-black community in the country. Guthrie's music still resonates there, especially in the town of Boley, where hope is hard to come by. Logan Layden of State Impact Oklahoma reports.

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3:00pm

Sat February 11, 2012
Analysis

Week In News: A Week Of Deals For Obama

James Fallows of The Atlantic talks to weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz about President Barack Obama's compromise on providing reproductive services mandated by health care law after resistance from religious institutions and his latest cover story for The Atlantic on Obama's demeanor and a recent deal reached with five of the biggest banks in the country to pay back individuals whose homes were wrongly foreclosed on.

3:00pm

Sat February 11, 2012
Around the Nation

Oklahoma Opts Out Of Foreclosure Deal

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 5:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Well, every single state in the country will get a piece of that $26 billion to help troubled homeowners keep their homes, every single state except Oklahoma. The attorney general in Oklahoma decided to opt out of the multistate settlement to hold banks accountable for questionable lending and foreclosure practices.

Scott Pruitt is Oklahoma's attorney general, and he joins me now on the line. Attorney General, welcome.

SCOTT PRUITT: Well, thank you, Guy.

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7:57pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

With Contraceptive Coverage Plan 2.0, Obama Pleases Allies, But Not Everyone

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:44 pm

President Obama, flanked by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, announces the revamp of the contraception-care policy on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

President Obama's latest proposed change in how contraceptives are covered by employer health insurance may not have ended the controversy that has raged for the past three weeks. But what the administration is calling an "accommodation" for religious employers has apparently mollified key allies who had opposed his original plan.

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4:44pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Religion

Catholics Split On Obama's Birth Control Decision

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 10:21 pm

Archbishop Thomas Wenski, shown celebrating Mass at the Cathedral of St. Mary in Miami last month, says the new birth control policy is a "smoke screen."
Lynne Sladky AP

Reaction from the Catholic community to the Obama administration's decision to revise its birth control policy was swift and mixed.

Under the new rule, employers with a religious objection to offering contraceptive coverage as part of their health care plans wouldn't have to provide it directly. Instead, the requirement to provide that coverage free of charge would fall on the insurance companies.

Some Catholics believe the president's new rule resolves the religious liberty issues. But others, including key bishops, say it is smoke and mirrors.

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4:13pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Animals

Saved From Extinction, Darwin's Crocs Are Now King

Crocodile ranger Tom Nichols stands beside the crocodile traps used in Darwin Harbour. Nichols' left hand was mangled by an irate "salty" nine years ago.
John Burnett NPR

It's appropriate that Darwin, the tropical capital of Australia's Northern Territory, is named for the English naturalist.

The massive, powerful and deadly saltwater crocodile — the world's largest living reptile — is the evolutionary triumph of 50 million years of natural selection. And in Darwin, the crocodile is equally dreaded and beloved.

Crocodylus porosus was hunted to near extinction in the last century. But in 1974, the Australian government put the species, known affectionately as the "Australian salty," under federal protection.

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3:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

Republican Contenders Make Pitches At CPAC

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 6:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The Republican presidential race came here to Washington today. Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Mitt Romney all spoke at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference. The gathering brings thousands of activists across the conservative spectrum together for three days.

NPR's Ari Shapiro joins us now from the conference. Hey there, Ari.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hi, Audie. How are you?

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3:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

'Political Intelligence' Congress' Topic Of The Week

The House ethics bill has stirred up conversation on Capitol Hill about how closely regulated the "political intelligence" industry should be. Robert Siegel talks with Wall Street Journal investigative reporter Brody Mullins about what the political intelligence industry does and why Senator Chuck Grassley and others feel strongly that it should be regulated.

11:26am

Fri February 10, 2012
Planet Money

The Undertaker Who Helps Big Banks Write Death Plans

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 6:03 pm

Nobody lives forever.
iStockphoto.com

The nation's big banks are writing death plans — living wills that spell out how, in a future crisis, they could be safely dismantled. The idea is that the death plans will help avoid another government bailout of the banks.

"You're technically writing your own funeral, down to the color of the flowers" says Dolores Atallo.

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5:41pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Economy

Birthplace Of 'Robo-Signing' Eyes Deal Critically

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 6:57 pm

A for-sale sign hangs in front of a Homestead, Fla., home. In 2009, Florida lawyer Tom Ice deposed a bank employee who admitted to signing hundreds of mortgage documents in a day without reading them.
J. Pat Carter AP

From the beginning, Florida lawyer Tom Ice says he realized the mass signing of mortgages was more than just a paperwork problem.

"I suspected then, and I suspect now, that we were really just touching the tip of the iceberg," he says.

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5:04pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Sharon Van Etten: Hypnotically Complicated

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 8:58 pm

Sharon Van Etten's third album, Tramp, comes out Feb. 7.
Dusdin Condren

Like most pop singers, Sharon Van Etten seems to love repetition — a technique used aggressively in ad jingles and Top 40 hits, but also in more hypnotic and emotionally complicated ways. Van Etten's new record, Tramp, is full of repeated riffs, drones and phonemes, and they're more intense and emotionally packed than ever. Songs like "Serpents" display her expansive voice and coiled songwriting, and are earning Van Etten a good deal of attention.

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