All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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4:51pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Wild Flag: Making Chaos Useful

Wild Flag's self-titled debut album was released earlier this month. Left to right: Rebecca Cole, Carrie Brownstein, Mary Timony, Janet Weiss.
Courtesy of the artist

Carrie Brownstein helped start Sleater-Kinney, the celebrated punk trio, when she was still in college. That band split in 2006, and though Brownstein kept busy — as a blogger and commentator for NPR Music, among other things — she says that by the end of 2010, she was feeling antsy.

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3:07pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

The Mad Musical Scientist Of Burbank, Calif.

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 11:50 am

Composer and sound designer Diego Stocco at work.
Courtesy of the artist

"I was probably 12 when I trashed my first electric guitar," Diego Stocco says. "I totally disassembled it, and I wasn't able to put it back together."

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3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Palestinian President Asks U.N. For State Recognition

The president of the Palestinian Authority has asked the U.N. to recognize his state. The Israelis say such a move would violate past agreements and are threatening retaliation. U.S. and European diplomats are scrambling to head off what could be a diplomatic train wreck.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Palestinians React To U.N. Bid For Statehood

Palestinians react to their leader's bid for statehood recognition at the United Nations. Mass rallies are planned across the West Bank. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Movies

Movie Reviews: Three Bio-Pics

NPR's Bob Mondello reviews a true-life triple feature: Machine Gun Preacher, Moneyball and Toast, three unlikely stories based on real people.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Jobs Bill; Spending Bill; GOP Presidential Race

Michele Norris speaks with our regular political commentators E.J. Dionne, of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks, of the New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Alexander; Boston Red Sox

Melissa Block and Michele Norris read emails from listeners.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Politics

Democrats, Republicans At Odds Over Stopgap Bill

A federal loan program to build more fuel-efficient cars became the latest budget flash point, with House Republicans wanting to raid the fund to help pay for FEMA disaster aid. Senate Democrats refused to go along. The standoff comes in a bill that would fund the entire government beyond next week.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

NASA: Satellite's Rate Of Descent Has Slowed

We reported on the variables that make it hard to, even at this late date, predict exactly when and where a dead 6-ton NASA satellite will fall to Earth. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, or UARS, will be the biggest NASA spacecraft to crash back to Earth, but it's now baffling scientists as its descent toward Earth slows — delaying its ultimate crash until the early part of the weekend. The space agency is now predicting the satellite will crash down to Earth late Friday or early Saturday, Eastern Time.

1:53pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Planet Money

Germany's Painful Unemployment Fix

Marchers demonstrate against the German labor reforms, known as Hartz IV. (November 5, 2005)
Sean Gallup Getty Images

As the U.S. and much of Europe struggle to bring down unemployment rates, one country stands apart: Germany, where the unemployment rate is just 6.2 percent.

The story of how Germany got here goes back nearly a decade.

In 2002, Germany looked a lot like the United States does today: it had no economic growth, and its unemployment rate was 8.7 percent and climbing.

Gerhard Schroeder, the German chancellor at the time, made an emergency call to a trusted friend.

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11:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Solyndra's Execs Take The Fifth

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 3:00 pm

Top executives of Solyndra, a bankrupt solar-energy company, have declined to testify in a congressional hearing Friday, invoking their Fifth Amendment rights. The company is under investigation for a half-billion dollar government loan guarantee it received.

5:30pm

Thu September 22, 2011
The Record

Facebook Announces New Partnerships For Music, Movies And TV

Screengrab of the Facebook Music profile picture.
Courtesy of Facebook

Facebook took a leap Thursday towards making itself into what it hopes will be the social center for entertainment and media. You'll be able to see what movies and TV your friends are watching, what music they're listening to and what news items they're reading.

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3:00pm

Thu September 22, 2011
NPR Story

Book Review: 'Apricot Jam'

Apricot Jam is a newly posthumously published collection of short pieces by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

3:00pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Politics

Alexander Discusses Leaving GOP Leadership Job

Melissa Block interviews Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee about his decision to leave his post as Republican conference chair this coming January. He has said that after four years in the third top spot in the Republican leadership, he's looking forward to having more independence.

3:00pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Politics

Obama Stresses Need For Infrastructure Improvements

To make the point that America's infrastructure is in need of repair and the federal government should do it, President Obama traveled to the Brent Spence Bridge. It runs over the Ohio River, and it connects House Speaker John Boehner's Ohio to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's Kentucky. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Ari Shapiro for more.

7:00am

Thu September 22, 2011
You Must Read This

In A Girls-Only World, A Land Of Brainy Beauty

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 7:28 pm

sultana

I first came across Sultana's Dream while doing research for a novel set in Bangladesh. I had traveled to Dhaka, the capital city, and stumbled on the Liberation War museum, where my visit coincided with an exhibition on the story.

I became fascinated by the life of its author, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, when I learned that, like me, she had been raised by a progressive Muslim family and actively encouraged to seek an education.

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3:29pm

Wed September 21, 2011
Asia

The Curious Case Of The Vanishing Chinese City

Originally published on Wed September 21, 2011 8:20 pm

Chinese officials announced on Aug. 22 that the large city of Chaohu in eastern China no longer existed. The move caught residents by surprise. Chaohu's museum, shown here, houses a Han dynasty tomb, and the city is known for its huge freshwater lake.
Louisa Lim NPR

Imagine a city like Los Angeles disappearing from the map completely. That's exactly what happened to Chaohu, a city in eastern China's Anhui province with a similar population — about 4 million. The people have remained, but the city has vanished in an administrative sleight of hand.

That was the Kafkaesque reality for Chaohu's inhabitants, who went to bed one night and woke up the morning of Aug. 22 to find out that their city no longer existed. For many, their first inkling that something had changed was from the local news.

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2:53pm

Wed September 21, 2011
Music Interviews

Fountains Of Wayne: Transcending Time And Place

Fountains of Wayne's new album is Sky Full of Holes. Left to right: Adam Schlesinger, Jody Porter, Chris Collingwood, Brian Young.
Courtesy of the artist

Often, you only need to hear a few lines to know you're listening to a Fountains of Wayne song. "Richie and Ruben," from the new album Sky Full of Holes, introduces its title characters as the kind of hapless losers the band loves to write about: "They opened up a bar called Living Hell / Right from the start, it didn't go too well / They didn't have the vibe or quite the right clientele."

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3:27pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'Prime Suspect'

In the beginning, there were lapels: Helen Mirren's DI Jane Tennison, circa 1991.
Acorn Media

Time again for film critic Bob Mondello's recommendation for your home-viewing queue. This week, to prepare for the start of NBC's new TV series Prime Suspect, he suggests you look back at the original PBS series, starring Helen Mirren.

The year was 1991, and a new British police procedural had what then counted as a gimmick: Its star — smart, forceful, and assertive — was a woman, which was a big deal.

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3:00pm

Tue September 20, 2011
NPR Story

Monastery Sends 'Cowboy Monks' Operation Out To Pasture

A Roman Catholic monastery in North Dakota is putting its ranching operation out to pasture, because it lacks monks with cowboy skills.

2:55pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Music Reviews

Lucas Santtana: Bossa Nova With A Brand-New Beat

Lucas Santtana's new album is Sem Nostalgia.
Pedro Cupertino Courtesy of the artist

Lucas Santtana is a Brazilian artist who has been hiding in plain view for years. I came across a record by Santtana back in 1999, EletroBenDada, which updated the experimental and political pop music of the 1960s and '70s Brazilian Tropicalia movement for a new generation. I heard nothing more from Santtana for more than 10 years, but it turns out he's been busy making great music in Brazil, even if hasn't been making it up to North America. His latest record, Sem Nostalgia, has just been released in the U.S.

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4:50pm

Mon September 19, 2011
Country/Americana

Hank Williams III: Ghosts And Cattle Calls

From country and klezmer to doom-rock and metal, Hank 3's latest output is plenty diverse.
Tara Israel

Hank Williams III, also known as Hank 3, is the son of Hank Williams Jr., as well as the grandson of Hank Williams, considered to be one of the greatest country music performers of all time. Hank 3 got his start in music playing punk and metal, then went on to form bands with members of Pantera and The Jesus Lizard. Hank 3 made country albums, too, but had little use for mainstream Nashville's restrictive culture.

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3:37pm

Mon September 19, 2011
Television

With Premiere Week Upon Us, We Want To Ask Why

The spot: Simon Cowell at the Los Angeles taping of The X Factor, one of many new shows you may not be able to watch this week.
Ray Mickshaw FOX

This is a big, big week for broadcast TV — 44 returning series are having their season premieres, and 14 new shows will launch in the span of seven days.

But does running premiere week that way still make sense for the TV business. Or does it just create a traffic jam on your television?

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3:00pm

Mon September 19, 2011
NPR Story

Netflix Splits Into Two Companies

Netflix is splitting into two companies — one to handle its online streaming business and one to handle DVDs by mail.

5:24pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Interviews

Ed Koch On Obama And Israel

Originally published on Sun September 18, 2011 5:24 pm

Former New York Mayor Ed Koch just sent a message to President Obama: Change your position on Israel, or face trouble with Jewish voters in 2012.

And he delivered that message at the ballot box in New York City.

Koch is a Democrat, but in last week's special election to replace U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner last week, Koch was a vocal supporter of Republican Bob Turner.

The reason, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, is his unhappiness with the Obama administration's approach to Israel.

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4:38pm

Sun September 18, 2011
A Blog Supreme

Monterey Jazz Festival 2011: Fast Footwork And East Bay Voices

Terence Blanchard (left) and Kermit Ruffins perform in the An Afternoon In Treme revue at the 2011 Monterey Jazz Festival.
Craig Lovell Monterey Jazz Festival

The town of Monterey, California, has reinvented itself several times. It was once a capital city when California was Spanish territory, and even when Mexico became independent. It was an important fishing town, as chronicled in the novels of John Steinbeck. And these days, tourism helps drive the local economy, with attractions like a world-famous aquarium, world-class golf clubs nearby like Pebble Beach, and the world's oldest continuously-running jazz festival.

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3:00pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Military Widows Use Adventure To Cope With Grief

Grief and extreme adventure typically don't go hand in hand. But for a group of military widows, the experiences came together recently at a retreat near Anchorage, Alaska, organized by the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors.

1:54pm

Sun September 18, 2011
Author Interviews

American History, Seen Through A Shot Glass

When you order a couple of beers at your neighborhood bar, you're not just having a drink, you're taking part in a grand old tradition stretching back to the birth of our nation and beyond.

When the first British colonists began to wash up on our shores, the very first thing they built was usually a tavern.

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5:06pm

Sat September 17, 2011
Author Interviews

Errol Morris Looks For Truth Outside Photographs

Overgrazed Land. Pennington County, South Dakota (1936) is one of several photographs Arthur Rothstein took to document dry, sun-baked earth of the South Dakota Badlands.
Arthur Rothstein Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection

Errol Morris is regarded as one of the world's most important filmmakers and is best known for his documentaries The Thin Blue Line and the Oscar-award winning Fog of War.

But before he was a filmmaker, he was a detective and he's always been interested in uncovering the mysteries of photographs. In his new book, Believing Is Seeing, Morris focuses on the things you can't see in photographs and the importance of what lies outside the frame.

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4:35pm

Sat September 17, 2011
Music Interviews

Hanni El Khatib: Hoop Dreams

Hanni El Khatib's debut album is called Will the Guns Come Out.
Courtesy of the artist

Hanni El Khatib is a budding artist and avid skateboarder from the San Francisco area whose debut album, Will the Guns Come Out, comes out this month. If El Khatib's name sounds familiar, it's probably because his song "I Got a Thing" is being used in one of Nike's global ad campaigns as kind of a modern surf, skate and all-around shredding anthem.

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