All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Pages

4:03pm

Mon October 13, 2014
Politics

Maffei, Katko battle for voters in tight congressional race

Democratic Congressman Dan Maffei (left) and Republican John Katko (right) are running to represent the 24th Congressional District, which includes four counties, including Onondaga County.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Democratic incumbent Dan Maffei and his Republican challenger John Katko are locked into a tight race that will determine who represents the Syracuse-area's 24th Congressional District in Congress.

Maffei says he knew the race would be close.

Read more

5:50pm

Sun October 12, 2014
Pop Culture

The New Food TV: The Era Of Julia Child Packed Its Knives And Went

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 6:52 pm

If you're one of the many addicts to the current crop of food shows, watching a clip of Julia Child — the original French Chef of television — is like visiting a different planet.

You might wonder how long she would last in the gladiator's arena that modern cooking shows have become. Since the original Japanese Iron Chef first appeared on the Food Network here in the U.S. 15 years ago, how-to cooking shows have gradually been displaced by food combat: reality shows that pit chefs against each other.

Read more

4:55pm

Sun October 12, 2014
Global Health

Liberian Singers Use The Power Of Music To Raise Ebola Awareness

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 6:52 pm

Elliott Adekoya, 31, aka The Milkman, is a DJ at Monrovia's Sky FM radio, pictured here his DJ booth. He is also part of a group of 45 Liberian musicians called the Save Liberia Project. They want to get the word out that Ebola is real, but it is not a death sentence. He says that message, which was propagated early on by the Ministry of Health, actually contributed to the problem.
John W. Poole NPR

In West Africa, one of the simplest ways to slow the Ebola outbreak is to educate people about how to keep from getting infected with the virus. Now, there are some signs that Ebola awareness is indeed driving down the number of cases in parts of Liberia — and Liberian musicians and DJs may deserve some of the credit.

Read more

4:55pm

Sun October 12, 2014
Africa

ISIS Advances On Kobani With Additional Fighters, Weapons

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 6:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more

4:55pm

Sun October 12, 2014
Global Health

Training Is Key In Lowering Risk For Health Care Workers Treating Ebola

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 6:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more

6:27pm

Sat October 11, 2014
Author Interviews

TV Giant Norman Lear Shares Gems From 92 Years Of 'Experience'

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 8:35 am

In addition to producing TV sitcoms such as All in the Family and The Jeffersons, Norman Lear has also worked as a social and political activist.
AP

When All In The Family debuted on CBS back in 1971, it was an instant hit. But it took creator Norman Lear three long years of persistence — right up to the final 20 minutes before the premiere — to convince network executives that it would be a hit, as he tells NPR's Arun Rath. When asked where he got the confidence to keep pushing the same pilot, first to ABC and then to CBS, Lear answered simply:

"Can you say 'beats the **** out of me' on NPR?"

Read more

5:08pm

Sat October 11, 2014
Music Interviews

Mary Lambert: 'You Change People's Opinions By Opening Your Heart'

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 6:33 pm

Mary Lambert's new album is called Heart On My Sleeve.
Courtesy of the artist

When Mary Lambert sang the hook for Macklemore & Ryan Lewis' 2012 hit "Same Love," her career transformed. She quickly went from performing at coffee shops in Seattle — "to six people, including my mom," as she tells it — to performing on Ellen, at the MTV Video Music Awards and the Grammys.

Read more

5:08pm

Sat October 11, 2014
Global Health

Investors Flock To Ebola-Related Companies

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 6:33 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more

5:08pm

Sat October 11, 2014
It's All Politics

Grandpa Jimmy Carter Casts A Shadow Over Ga. Governor's Race

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 10:57 am

Jason Carter, the eldest grandson of former President Jimmy Carter, is running to become Georgia's next governor.
Erik S. Lesser Landov

On Sunday, Jimmy Carter makes an appearance at a church in South Georgia alongside his eldest grandson, Jason. Jason Carter is the politician these days, a state senator, and is now making a bid for the governor's office.

Democrats haven't won that office in 16 years. Now, the younger Carter, a Democrat, is neck-and-neck with the Republican incumbent, Nathan Deal.

This March, on the last day of Georgia's legislative session, state Sen. Carter was allowed to take the podium as president of the Senate — a ceremonial turn for outgoing Senators.

Read more

5:43pm

Fri October 10, 2014
This Week's Must Read

For This Baseball Season, Roger Angell Has Just The 'Ticket'

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:43 pm

"Most of us fans fall in love with baseball when we are children," writes Roger Angell. At any age, though, the ballgame is better with a friendly and knowledgeable companion. I can't think of a better one than Angell.

Now 94, he has written about baseball for over half a century, beginning when the New Yorker magazine sent him to spring training in 1962.

"I have covered this beat in haphazard fashion, following my own inclinations and interests," he writes in Season Ticket about the game in the mid-'80s.

Read more

5:43pm

Fri October 10, 2014
Parallels

Amid Tight Restrictions And Rubble, A Cement Shortage In Gaza

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 5:15 pm

A Palestinian worker checks a truck loaded with bags of cement as it crosses into southern Gaza from Israel last year. Israel has restricted cement supplies to only specific projects.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Gaza businessman Maher Abu Ghanema wants to rebuild his currency exchange shop in Gaza City, but because for years Israel has restricted cement supplies to only specific projects, it's been slow going.

"I need at least 3 tons of cement," says Ghanema, who after two weeks of effort found 1 ton. "Whatever we got is from the black market, and it costs four or five times higher than the original price. Plus, it's low-quality."

Read more

5:40pm

Fri October 10, 2014
Parallels

43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 7:04 pm

Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26.
Miguel Tovar/STF LatinContent/Getty Images

On the second story of the municipal palace in Iguala, Mexico, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca occupied the large corner office. His wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda, head of the city's family welfare department, occupied the one right next door. From there, residents say, the two ruthlessly ruled over this city of 150,000 in the southern state of Guerrero. A national newspaper dubbed the duo the "imperial couple."

Read more

5:17pm

Fri October 10, 2014
Politics

Katko, Maffei tackle heroin, synthetic drug use in different ways

Republican congressional candidate John Katko stands with members of the Oswego County Legislature, Assemblyman Will Barclay, and Teresa Woolson, whose son died after using synthetic marijuana.
Gino Geruntino WRVO

Both candidates running to represent the 24th Congressional District want to prevent heroin and synthetic drug use in New York, but have different ways of doing it.

Republican candidate John Katko says he has a twofold approach to address the issue.

"It's targeted enforcement, beefed up targeted enforcement about the heroin and synthetic drug problem, through the enhancement of task forces," Katko said. "So that's basically what this plan is about."

Katko proposes to increase law enforcement funding and manpower, and expand treatment options.

Read more

4:18pm

Fri October 10, 2014
Politics

Stirpe, DeMarco take sides in business climate, Start-Up New York debate

Republican Rob DeMarco (left) and Democratic incumbent Al Stirpe (right) disagree on the state of New York's business climate.
Rob DeMarco Campaign / Al Stirpe Campaign Facebook

One of the most hotly contested races on Election Day in central New York is for the 127th state Assembly seat. Democrat incumbent Al Stirpe faces Republican Rob DeMarco in the fight for the district that runs along the eastern end of Onondaga County, from Clay to Tully.

During a debate on WRVO’s Campbell Conversations, DeMarco suggests New York’s business climate is poor and it’s time for a change.

Read more

5:36pm

Thu October 9, 2014
Global Health

In Collecting And Cremating Ebola Victims, A Grim Public Service

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 8:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

5:30pm

Thu October 9, 2014
New Boom

Millennials Are Blue Now, But Party Allegiance Could Be Up For Grabs

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 8:28 pm

Millennial focus group: Arturo Chang (from left), Shaza Loutfi, Alexa Graziolli, Stephen Crouch, Jessica Ramser. Not pictured: Ginger Gibson.
Rachel Lushinsky NPR

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

President Obama is holding a town hall meeting Thursday in California with a group he wants to mobilize for the midterm elections: millennial entrepreneurs. Millennials — young people ages 18-34 — are a key part of the Democratic coalition.

Read more

5:16pm

Thu October 9, 2014
Goats and Soda

Three Forlorn Presidents Bring Ebola Wish List To The World Bank

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 6:28 pm

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visited West Point in August, when the impoverished neighborhood was quarantined to prevent the spread of Ebola.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is a "tragedy not seen in modern times," said Sierra Leone's president Ernest Bai Koroma.

At the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank on Thursday, Koroma and the presidents of Guinea and Liberia are pleading with the international community for help battling the Ebola epidemic. In the three hardest-hit countries, the virus has already killed nearly 4,000 people.

Read more

6:13pm

Wed October 8, 2014
Science

Climate Change Worsens Coastal Flooding From High Tides

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

Cindy Minnix waits for a bus in a flooded street on Oct. 18, 2012, in Miami Beach. A changing climate is making floods related to high tides more frequent, scientists say.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

A wave of high tides is expected to hit much of the East Coast this week. These special tides — king tides — occur a few times a year when the moon's orbit brings it close to the Earth.

But scientists say that lately, even normal tides throughout the year are pushing water higher up onto land. And that's causing headaches for people who live along coastlines.

As Bob Dylan might have put it, the tides, they are a changin'.

Read more

6:13pm

Wed October 8, 2014
Business

Obama Proposal Could Extend Overtime Benefits To More Workers

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

5:24pm

Wed October 8, 2014
World

British Imams Speak Out Against Islamic State

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

5:24pm

Wed October 8, 2014
Global Health

U.S. Ambassador To Liberia: Many Challenges Remain In Ebola Response

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more

5:24pm

Wed October 8, 2014
All Tech Considered

Apple Says iOS Encryption Protects Privacy; FBI Raises Crime Fears

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

FBI Director James Comey says new encryption features allow people "to place themselves beyond the law."
Alex Wong Getty Images

The FBI and other law enforcement agencies are up in arms about new technology now available from Apple and soon to be released by Google.

The software encrypts the data on smartphones and other mobile devices so that not even the companies themselves will be able to access the information.

Read more

4:49pm

Wed October 8, 2014
Politics

For lieutenant governor, Green Party's Hawkins chose education activist

Brian Jones, left, with Howie Hawkins. Jones is Hawkins' pick for lieuntenant governor as he runs for governor again.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

When Howie Hawkins began his second run for governor as a member of the Green Party, he says he found education to be a key issue, so that’s where he looked for a running mate.

"We had a checklist of items that would make the ideal candidate," he said. "And my running mate, Brian Jones, he added to the list. He checked every box."

Read more

2:24pm

Wed October 8, 2014
Book Reviews

In Cronenberg's 'Consumed,' An Appetite For Sex, Death And The Latest Gear

Here's everything you need to know about Consumed in one sentence: This is a book that is unmistakably written by David Cronenberg.

Read more

5:58pm

Tue October 7, 2014
Code Switch

'A Chosen Exile': Black People Passing In White America

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 2:24 pm

Dr. Albert Johnston passed in order to practice medicine. After living as leading citizens in Keene, N.H., the Johnstons revealed their true racial identity, and became national news.
Historical Society of Cheshire County

Several years ago, Stanford historian Allyson Hobbs was talking with a favorite aunt, who was also the family storyteller. Hobbs learned that she had a distant cousin whom she'd never met nor heard of.

Which is exactly the way the cousin wanted it.

Hobbs' cousin had been living as white, far away in California, since she'd graduated from high school. This was at the insistence of her mother.

Read more

4:59pm

Tue October 7, 2014
Parallels

A Smuggler Explains How He Helped Fighters Along 'Jihadi Highway'

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 2:08 pm

Alleged Islamic State militants stand next to an ISIS flag atop a hill in the Syrian town of Ain al-Arab, called Kobane by the Kurds, as seen from the Turkish-Syrian border in Suruc, Turkey, on Monday.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

The Syrian smuggler agrees to meet at an outdoor cafe in Kilis, a town on the edge of Syria-Turkey frontier. As waiters deliver glasses of hot, sweet tea and Turks play dominoes at nearby tables, he talks about his role in the "Jihadi Highway" and why he finally decided to quit.

The smuggler, in his mid-20s, is open about every aspect of the lucrative enterprise, except for revealing his name. He is well-known to the militants of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, who paid him well for his skills, and who certainly would kill him for speaking to a journalist.

Read more

4:59pm

Tue October 7, 2014
Asia

After Mapping Seafloor, Search Resumes For Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 2:24 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more

4:59pm

Tue October 7, 2014
Global Health

CDC Director: U.S. Hospitals Should Use 'Index Of Suspicion' With Ebola

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 5:43 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:26pm

Tue October 7, 2014
Politics

Woolf says he is in tune with North Country voters, but still trails Stefanik in polls

Aaron Woolf, the Democratic candidate running to represent the North Country's 21st Congressional District, says his focus is "laser sharp" and tailored to the North Country.
Julia Botero WRVO

Aaron Woolf, the Democratic candidate running to represent the North Country's 21st Congressional District, says he plans to show the divide between himself and his Republican opponent Elise Stefanik during Wednesday night's debate.

"The very fact that she has been less forthcoming with the press, to put it mildly, lately, means that this is really a very crucial opportunity for us to make sure she's on the record and being as specific as we've asked her to be," Woolf explained to reporters during a conference call Tuesday.

Read more

4:20pm

Tue October 7, 2014
Law

Justices Skeptical Of Beard Rule In Inmate Religious Rights Case

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 2:24 pm

Attorney Douglas Laycock leaves the Supreme Court Tuesday after arguing before the court on behalf of Arkansas prison inmate Gregory Holt.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a case that pits the authority of prison officials against the religious rights of prison inmates. Specifically, the question is whether a federal law aimed at shoring up those religious rights requires the state of Arkansas to allow a Muslim prisoner to wear a half-inch beard.

Gregory Holt, convicted of stabbing his ex-girlfriend, argues that the tenets of his Muslim faith require him not to cut his beard. As a compromise, he asked Arkansas prison authorities for permission to at least wear a half-inch beard.

Read more

Pages