All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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5:06pm

Sun March 30, 2014
My Big Break

Cesar Millan's Long Walk To Becoming The 'Dog Whisperer'

Cesar Millan's television show Dog Whisperer on National Geographic debuted in 2004, but Millan previously spent years struggling to pursue a career as a dog trainer.
Robin Layton Courtesy of Cesar Millan

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Long before Cesar Millan became the "Dog Whisperer," with TV shows and a best-selling series of books, he had to learn how to ask for a job in English.

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5:06pm

Sun March 30, 2014
Shots - Health News

Everybody Has A Price: Why This 'Invincible' Chose Insurance

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 6:30 pm

When Brad Stevens was young, his only "health insurance" was taking tons of vitamins and spending three hours at the gym every day. But after a serious bike accident and an expensive battle with thyroid cancer, the 59-year-old realized nobody's invincible.
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

When we first met Brad Stevens, he was living in Lakeport, Calif., a struggling massage therapist in a struggling town on the southern tip of Clear Lake. Stevens had been uninsured his entire adult life, and used to believe firmly that clean living and exercise could stave off any need for medical care.

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5:06pm

Sun March 30, 2014
U.S.

Taking Chances With Lottery For High-Skilled Workers' Visas

The deadline for H-1B Visa applications is April 1. In the week after that deadline, a lottery system will determine which high-skilled workers are able to stay and work in the US. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with Bhavik Bhatt, who has already struck out once before in the lottery, but is taking his chances again.

6:59pm

Sat March 29, 2014
It's All Politics

What's With This Video Of McConnell Doing Stuff?

The Kentucky Opportunity Coalition used footage from Mitch McConnell's campaign for its own ads.
AP

5:15pm

Sat March 29, 2014
Sports

For Women, Being A Jock May Also Signal Political Ambition

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:59 pm

Sen. Kristen Gillibrand, D-N.Y., high-fives her teammate Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala. during the annual Women's Congressional Softball Game last June.
Maddie Meyer The Washington Post/Getty Images

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York tries to play tennis a couple of times a week. Sports have been part of her life for a long time, going back to high school when she played tennis and soccer.

Later, at Dartmouth in the late 1980s, Gillibrand served as co-captain of the squash team. What the future senator did not do in college was participate in student government. "I'd gone to one or two young Democratic events, and interestingly, it was almost all male — and all of the men were very aggressive," she says. "And so I didn't really feel like I fit in."

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5:02pm

Sat March 29, 2014
Around the Nation

In Arizona, Citizens Keep Close Eye On Immigration Checkpoint

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:59 pm

Members of the Arivaca, Ariz., community monitor an immigration checkpoint about 25 miles north of the Mexican border. Some residents say border agents go beyond their legal authority.
Ted Robbins NPR

Border Patrol checkpoints aren't always near the border. Some aren't even on roads that go to the border. Take Arivaca Road; it's an East-West route 25 miles north of the Mexican border in Southern Arizona.

A Border Patrol checkpoint has been operating there around the clock for seven years. Some residents of the town of Arivaca say agents at the checkpoint go well beyond their legal authority; searching vehicles and questioning citizens without cause. So they've begun their own monitoring — to inspect the process.

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4:34pm

Sat March 29, 2014
Code Switch

Activists: We Want An Emancipator, Not A 'Deporter In Chief'

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:59 pm

Members of a coalition of Latino groups rally outside the Federal Building in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Activists say they plan more rallies and demonstrations across the country to push for action on immigration reform.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Activists who support an overhaul of the immigration system are angry and frustrated. The immigration bill that passed in the Senate in June is stalled out. Meanwhile, the Obama administration is on pace to deport some 2 million illegal immigrants since taking office six years ago.

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6:42pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Movie Reviews

Send Out The Doves: 'Noah' Lands On Solid Ground

Ila (Emma Watson) and her husband, Shem, are two passengers aboard the ark built by Noah to escape God's flood in Noah, Darren Aronofsky's imagining of the biblical tale.
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

The story of Noah's Ark is getting blockbuster treatment in Hollywood's new biblical epic Noah. Darren Aronofsky's film about the Old Testament shipbuilder has been sparking controversy — but there's no denying that the Great Flood, digitized, is a pretty great flood.

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6:34pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Code Switch

Why A Proper Lady Found Herself Behind Bars

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 10:55 pm

Mary Peabody leaves the dining room of a motel in St. Augustine, Fla., on March 31, 1964, after being arrested.
Harold Valentine AP

This story is part of NPR's 50th anniversary coverage of 1964.

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6:34pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Author Interviews

In 'Storied Life,' Characters Come With A Reading List

Jan Sandvik iStockphoto

Thirty-nine year old widower A.J. Fikry is an unlikely romantic hero: He's cranky, he drinks too much, his bookstore is failing and don't get him started on the state of publishing. He's also at the center of Gabrielle Zevin's new novel, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry.

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5:55pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Politics and Government

Budget negotiations continued at Capitol

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders are still struggling to come to a final budget agreement, after the time for an expected announcement came and went on Friday.

Optimistic lawmakers had predicted a final accord on the budget by mid day Friday, but in the end, were unable to achieve that goal.

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5:33pm

Fri March 28, 2014
This Week's Must Read

An Ode To Our Newest Neighbor: Biden, The Pink Dwarf Planet

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 6:34 pm

two planets
iStockphoto

This week, astronomers discovered a new dwarf planet at the outer reaches of our solar system. It's a pink, icy ball that's beyond Pluto's orbit. Its official name is 2012 VP113, but scientists have given it the nickname "Biden."

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5:10pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Sports

American Pastime's Season Starts Off, In Australia

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 6:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

So long winter, so long spring training, the American past time gets back in full swing on Sunday and Monday, as Major League baseball begins around the country. But actually, officially speaking, it began already halfway around the world on a cricket ground in Australia. That's where the Los Angeles Dodgers won two games from the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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4:32pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Parallels

Iranians Begin To Feel The Heavy Burden Of Syria's War

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:04 pm

A man looks at an unexploded barrel bomb that landed in a cemetery after being dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar Assad in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

The Syrian civil war has been a major headache for President Obama. Critics at home and abroad, like Saudi Arabia, where the president was on Friday, have urged the U.S. to do more.

But the U.S. isn't the only country that's faced difficult choices over Syria. Iran and Syria have been close allies for decades. And in Iran, discussions about Syria are surprisingly frank, complex and demonstrate growing divisions over how to handle a costly war that has no end in sight.

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6:25pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 9:17 am

Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes.
Mary Levin/University of Washington

Back in the 1970s, a geneticist named Mary-Claire King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.

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5:27pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Politics

Voting Rights Fight Takes New Direction

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

An election official checks a voter's photo identification at an early-voting polling site in Austin, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

It's that time again, when primary voters start casting their ballots for the midterm elections. As in recent years, voters face new rules and restrictions, including the need in 16 states to show a photo ID.

But this year, some voting rights activists say they're seeing a change — fewer new restrictions and, in some places, even a hint of bipartisanship.

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5:27pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Book Reviews

Book Review: 'How To Dance As The Roof Caves In'

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 6:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Making poetry out of something as messy as the recent housing crisis may sound like a tall order, but Nick Lantz has done it. The collection is called "How to Dance as the Roof Caves In." Our reviewer, Tess Taylor says calls it biting but tender.

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5:27pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Middle East

President Prepares To Meet King As U.S.-Saudi Divisions Deepen

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:31pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions.
Lucy Reading-Ikkanda

Using the labor of dozens of undergraduate students, scientists have built a customized yeast chromosome from scratch.

It's a milestone in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, where organisms can be tailored for industrial use. In this case, the near-term goal is to understand the genetics of yeast, and eventually the genetics of us.

This was quite an undertaking. Yeast have about 6,000 genes packed in 16 tidy bundles called chromosomes. Each chromosome is an enormous molecule of DNA packed in proteins.

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4:12pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Politics

Internal Report Clears Christie Of Bridgegate, But Dems Don't Buy It

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

We now have the results of an internal investigation into the George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal. Today's report was commissioned by the administration of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, and it finds the governor did nothing wrong. It won't be the last word. Critics question the report's credibility, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

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4:12pm

Thu March 27, 2014
History

When A Record Quake Struck Alaska, One Small Church Survived

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Fifty years ago today, the most powerful recorded earthquake in North American history struck Alaska. The quake, which measured 9.2 on the Richter scale, was also the second largest in recorded history. The trembler and the ensuing tsunami resulted in 30 deaths and caused massive destruction, including landslides that destroyed scores of city blocks in Anchorage.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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6:56pm

Wed March 26, 2014
All Tech Considered

From The Birth Of The iPhone To An Era Of Lawsuits

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

One of the earliest iPhone prototypes. This system was pieced together to test early versions of the iPhone's software.
Courtesy of Apple

Next week Apple and Samsung are heading back to court. The two technology giants have been locked in an ongoing patent battle for years.

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6:30pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Shots - Health News

Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:03 am

Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots.
iStockphoto

The symptoms of autism may not be obvious until a child is a toddler, but the disorder itself appears to begin well before birth.

Brain tissue taken from children who died and also happened to have autism revealed patches of disorganization in the cortex, a thin sheet of cells that's critical for learning and memory, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Tissue samples from children without autism didn't have those characteristic patches.

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6:14pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Books

In Karen Russell's World, Sleep Is For The Lucky Few

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:14 am

cover detail
Atavist Books

Getting much sleep lately? The citizens of Karen Russell's dystopian novella, Sleep Donation, haven't been getting any. It's the near future, and America has been suffering from an insomnia crisis where hundreds of thousands of cases are terminal. And so an agency called Slumber Corps has been established to battle the problem.

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5:51pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Sports

NLRB Sides With College Football Players Hoping To Unionize

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A ruling by the National Labor Relations Board today could really shake up big-money college sports. The board took the first step in favor of allowing Northwestern University's football players to unionize. A regional director for the board ruled that these college athletes meet the definition of university employees under federal law.

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5:31pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Environment

Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Brings 'Bad Juju' And Pain 25 Years Later

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:54 pm

Scott Pegau, a scientist at the Prince William Sound Science Center, studies the effects of spilled oil on the environment in Cordova, Alaska.
Debbie Elliott NPR

At Ross Mullins' home in Cordova, Alaska, you have to slam the front door extra hard to make it close. The former commercial fisherman lives in a small wood-frame house that's in need of repair. Some of the windows are cracked and he leaves the water faucets dripping to protect uninsulated pipes from the harsh Alaskan winter.

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground and started leaking oil 25 years ago, the disaster drastically changed the fishing industry in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Mullins has never recovered from that blow.

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5:22pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Parallels

How Russia's Annexation Of Crimea Could Hurt Its Economy

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:05 am

A street vendor in Simferopol, Crimea, sells eggs with the dual currency price tags in Russian rubles and Ukrainian hryvnias. Russia's annexation of Crimea mean it will now have to prop up the peninsula's weak economy.
Dmitry Serebryakov AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin's swift move to annex Crimea is seen as a sign of strength by many Russians, and it has boosted Putin's popularity at home. But when it comes to Russia's economy, many analysts think Russia's prospects are looking weaker.

In recent days, we've seen Russians rallying in the streets, waving flags and celebrating Putin's move to reclaim Crimea as part of Russia.

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4:31pm

Wed March 26, 2014
All Tech Considered

Backlash To Facebook Buying Virtual Reality Firm Comes Swiftly

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:08 am

Attendees wear Oculus Rift HD virtual reality headsets at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

When Facebook purchases a company, you can often hear a collective groan go around the Internet — "There goes the neighborhood."

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3:35pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Business

Kodak puts Eastman Business Park on the market

Eastman Business Park
wxxi file photo

The Eastman Business Park (EBP) in Rochester is officially up for sale, Kodak announced Tuesday.

Company spokesman Chris Veronda says it’s the right time to hand development of the industrial and technology park over to a new entity.

"Kodak believes the site can best continue its transformation under the ownership of a firm that’s focused on its redevelopment. And, at the same time, the sale of EBP will allow Kodak to focus on its customers in the commercial imaging business."

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5:06pm

Tue March 25, 2014
Media

Resignation Revives Doubts About Bloomberg China Coverage

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Bloomberg News finds itself under unwelcome scrutiny once again, as its parent company's chairman suggests that reporting on the corruption of China ruling elites isn't part of its core mission. A key China editor also revealed this week that he had quit Bloomberg in protest of a decision not to publish a subsequent investigation.

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