All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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5:33pm

Fri March 28, 2014
This Week's Must Read

An Ode To Our Newest Neighbor: Biden, The Pink Dwarf Planet

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 6:34 pm

two planets
iStockphoto

This week, astronomers discovered a new dwarf planet at the outer reaches of our solar system. It's a pink, icy ball that's beyond Pluto's orbit. Its official name is 2012 VP113, but scientists have given it the nickname "Biden."

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5:10pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Sports

American Pastime's Season Starts Off, In Australia

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 6:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

So long winter, so long spring training, the American past time gets back in full swing on Sunday and Monday, as Major League baseball begins around the country. But actually, officially speaking, it began already halfway around the world on a cricket ground in Australia. That's where the Los Angeles Dodgers won two games from the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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4:32pm

Fri March 28, 2014
Parallels

Iranians Begin To Feel The Heavy Burden Of Syria's War

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 4:04 pm

A man looks at an unexploded barrel bomb that landed in a cemetery after being dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar Assad in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on Thursday.
Reuters/Landov

The Syrian civil war has been a major headache for President Obama. Critics at home and abroad, like Saudi Arabia, where the president was on Friday, have urged the U.S. to do more.

But the U.S. isn't the only country that's faced difficult choices over Syria. Iran and Syria have been close allies for decades. And in Iran, discussions about Syria are surprisingly frank, complex and demonstrate growing divisions over how to handle a costly war that has no end in sight.

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6:25pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 9:17 am

Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes.
Mary Levin/University of Washington

Back in the 1970s, a geneticist named Mary-Claire King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.

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5:27pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Middle East

President Prepares To Meet King As U.S.-Saudi Divisions Deepen

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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5:27pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Politics

Voting Rights Fight Takes New Direction

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

An election official checks a voter's photo identification at an early-voting polling site in Austin, Texas.
Eric Gay AP

It's that time again, when primary voters start casting their ballots for the midterm elections. As in recent years, voters face new rules and restrictions, including the need in 16 states to show a photo ID.

But this year, some voting rights activists say they're seeing a change — fewer new restrictions and, in some places, even a hint of bipartisanship.

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5:27pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Book Reviews

Book Review: 'How To Dance As The Roof Caves In'

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 6:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Making poetry out of something as messy as the recent housing crisis may sound like a tall order, but Nick Lantz has done it. The collection is called "How to Dance as the Roof Caves In." Our reviewer, Tess Taylor says calls it biting but tender.

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4:31pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions.
Lucy Reading-Ikkanda

Using the labor of dozens of undergraduate students, scientists have built a customized yeast chromosome from scratch.

It's a milestone in the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology, where organisms can be tailored for industrial use. In this case, the near-term goal is to understand the genetics of yeast, and eventually the genetics of us.

This was quite an undertaking. Yeast have about 6,000 genes packed in 16 tidy bundles called chromosomes. Each chromosome is an enormous molecule of DNA packed in proteins.

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4:12pm

Thu March 27, 2014
Politics

Internal Report Clears Christie Of Bridgegate, But Dems Don't Buy It

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

We now have the results of an internal investigation into the George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal. Today's report was commissioned by the administration of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, and it finds the governor did nothing wrong. It won't be the last word. Critics question the report's credibility, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

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4:12pm

Thu March 27, 2014
History

When A Record Quake Struck Alaska, One Small Church Survived

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Fifty years ago today, the most powerful recorded earthquake in North American history struck Alaska. The quake, which measured 9.2 on the Richter scale, was also the second largest in recorded history. The trembler and the ensuing tsunami resulted in 30 deaths and caused massive destruction, including landslides that destroyed scores of city blocks in Anchorage.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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6:56pm

Wed March 26, 2014
All Tech Considered

From The Birth Of The iPhone To An Era Of Lawsuits

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

One of the earliest iPhone prototypes. This system was pieced together to test early versions of the iPhone's software.
Courtesy of Apple

Next week Apple and Samsung are heading back to court. The two technology giants have been locked in an ongoing patent battle for years.

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6:30pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Shots - Health News

Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:03 am

Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots.
iStockphoto

The symptoms of autism may not be obvious until a child is a toddler, but the disorder itself appears to begin well before birth.

Brain tissue taken from children who died and also happened to have autism revealed patches of disorganization in the cortex, a thin sheet of cells that's critical for learning and memory, researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Tissue samples from children without autism didn't have those characteristic patches.

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6:14pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Books

In Karen Russell's World, Sleep Is For The Lucky Few

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:14 am

cover detail
Atavist Books

Getting much sleep lately? The citizens of Karen Russell's dystopian novella, Sleep Donation, haven't been getting any. It's the near future, and America has been suffering from an insomnia crisis where hundreds of thousands of cases are terminal. And so an agency called Slumber Corps has been established to battle the problem.

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5:51pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Sports

NLRB Sides With College Football Players Hoping To Unionize

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A ruling by the National Labor Relations Board today could really shake up big-money college sports. The board took the first step in favor of allowing Northwestern University's football players to unionize. A regional director for the board ruled that these college athletes meet the definition of university employees under federal law.

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5:31pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Environment

Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Brings 'Bad Juju' And Pain 25 Years Later

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 9:54 pm

Scott Pegau, a scientist at the Prince William Sound Science Center, studies the effects of spilled oil on the environment in Cordova, Alaska.
Debbie Elliott NPR

At Ross Mullins' home in Cordova, Alaska, you have to slam the front door extra hard to make it close. The former commercial fisherman lives in a small wood-frame house that's in need of repair. Some of the windows are cracked and he leaves the water faucets dripping to protect uninsulated pipes from the harsh Alaskan winter.

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground and started leaking oil 25 years ago, the disaster drastically changed the fishing industry in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Mullins has never recovered from that blow.

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5:22pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Parallels

How Russia's Annexation Of Crimea Could Hurt Its Economy

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:05 am

A street vendor in Simferopol, Crimea, sells eggs with the dual currency price tags in Russian rubles and Ukrainian hryvnias. Russia's annexation of Crimea mean it will now have to prop up the peninsula's weak economy.
Dmitry Serebryakov AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin's swift move to annex Crimea is seen as a sign of strength by many Russians, and it has boosted Putin's popularity at home. But when it comes to Russia's economy, many analysts think Russia's prospects are looking weaker.

In recent days, we've seen Russians rallying in the streets, waving flags and celebrating Putin's move to reclaim Crimea as part of Russia.

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4:31pm

Wed March 26, 2014
All Tech Considered

Backlash To Facebook Buying Virtual Reality Firm Comes Swiftly

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:08 am

Attendees wear Oculus Rift HD virtual reality headsets at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

When Facebook purchases a company, you can often hear a collective groan go around the Internet — "There goes the neighborhood."

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3:35pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Business

Kodak puts Eastman Business Park on the market

Eastman Business Park
wxxi file photo

The Eastman Business Park (EBP) in Rochester is officially up for sale, Kodak announced Tuesday.

Company spokesman Chris Veronda says it’s the right time to hand development of the industrial and technology park over to a new entity.

"Kodak believes the site can best continue its transformation under the ownership of a firm that’s focused on its redevelopment. And, at the same time, the sale of EBP will allow Kodak to focus on its customers in the commercial imaging business."

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5:06pm

Tue March 25, 2014
Media

Resignation Revives Doubts About Bloomberg China Coverage

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Bloomberg News finds itself under unwelcome scrutiny once again, as its parent company's chairman suggests that reporting on the corruption of China ruling elites isn't part of its core mission. A key China editor also revealed this week that he had quit Bloomberg in protest of a decision not to publish a subsequent investigation.

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4:43pm

Tue March 25, 2014
Regional Coverage

Oswego County Legislature to consider new fiber optic Internet plan

Gino Geruntino WRVO

The chairman of the Oswego County Legislature wants to bring another option for high-speed fiber-optic broadband service to the county. Kevin Gardner introduced the plan during his recent State of the County address, saying it would begin by connecting county-owned properties and then making the service available to town governments.

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4:42pm

Tue March 25, 2014
The Salt

In Ranchers Vs. Weeds, Climate Change Gives Weeds An Edge

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

A tall, rubbery weed with golden flowers Dalmatian toadflax is encroaching on grasslands in 32 U.S. states.
pverdonk/Flickr

Most climate models paint a bleak picture of the Great Plains a century from now as a hot region besieged by heavy rainstorms and flooding.

And new studies suggest that climate change may bring farmers another headache: more invasive plants.

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4:16pm

Tue March 25, 2014
News

At Nuclear Summit, Ukraine Questions Dominate The Day

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

President Obama wrapped up a two-day nuclear security summit in The Hague today. He's been operating on two tracks on this trip. At the summit, he's been urging countries to get rid of their nuclear material. On the sidelines, he's been organizing the global community to isolate Russia, following it's annexation of Crimea.

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4:16pm

Tue March 25, 2014
Global Health

The Sources And Symptoms Of A Disease With A Global Reputation

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 7:28 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Some facts now about the Ebola virus. It was discovered in 1976 after an outbreak in Zaire, which was the name then of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. There are five strains, named for the site of the outbreak where they were first identified. So the outbreak in Guinea is of the Zaire strain. The other strains are Sudan, Ivory Coast, Bundibugyo - that's in Uganda - and Reston. That's in northern Virginia.

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2:31pm

Tue March 25, 2014
Sports

Amid pressure over name, Redskins create foundation

Keith Allison Flickr

The Oneida Indian Nation in upstate New York supports the creation of a new foundation by Washington D.C.'s professional football team, though it says it's not a solution.

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5:07pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Parallels

Short On Dollars, Venezuela Tries To Halt Black-Market Trading

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 9:45 pm

Venezuelans line up to buy goods at a store in Caracas on March 10. Protesters have been taking to the streets for weeks over the country's troubled economy and other issues. The government introduced a new foreign currency exchange system on Monday, seeking to stabilize the bolivar, which has lost much of its value against the U.S. dollar.
Leo Ramirez AFP/Getty Images

The Venezuelan capital, Caracas, can be one of the most expensive cities in the world — or one of the cheapest. It all depends on how you exchange your dollars.

At a fast food restaurant in the city recently, a pretty tasty plate of chicken and rice cost me 160 bolivars. At the official exchange rate set by the government, that works out to a little more than $25; at the black market rate, it's just $2.

Needless to say, most anyone who can change money on the black market in Venezuela does so.

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5:03pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Television

Fans Of 'The Good Wife' Rocked By [Spoiler Alert]

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Matthew Goode (left) as Finn Polmar and Josh Charles (right) as Will Gardner in Sunday night's episode of CBS's The Good Wife.
CBS

The CBS legal drama The Good Wife centers on smart, attractive Chicago lawyer Alicia Florrick. She's "the good wife" because she stood by her politician husband when he cheated on her.

But the show's most compelling story line has always been between Alicia and another lawyer, Will Gardner. And if you don't want to know what happened in that storyline last night, stop reading NOW.

No, Really: Major Spoiler Ahead

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5:00pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Architecture

In The Face Of Disaster, Pritzker Winner Shigeru Ban Designs Solutions

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 9:19 pm

Cardboard Church, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Stephen Goodenough Photographer Shigeru Ban Architects

Each year the Pritzker Architecture Prize goes to a star architect with a long list of glamorous commissions around the globe. This year's winner is a little different.

Shigeru Ban has designed museums, homes and concert halls. But Ban is best known for a more humble kind of work: The temporary structures he's built for refugees and evacuees all over the world.

Ban may be the only architect in the world who makes buildings out of paper — cardboard paper tubes, to be precise.

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4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
The Salt

Carp(e) Diem: Kentucky Sends Invasive Fish To China

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 9:47 pm

Commercial fisherman Ronnie Hopkins (left) and his assistant, Armondo, catch Asian carp on Lake Barkley, Ky.
Paul Rister AP

The invasive Asian carp has now been found in 12 states and in the Great Lakes watershed, gobbling up native fish, jumping aggressively into boats and reproducing like crazy. Researchers have tried various ways to slow the spread of the fish as it prowls other waterways.

And, so far, efforts to introduce the big, bony fish to American diners haven't caught on. So now a processing plant in Kentucky is trying the latest method of Asian carp disposal: sending them to China.

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4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
News

Madoff Aides Found Guilty For Role In Massive Ponzi Scheme

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Five of Bernie Madoff's former employees were found guilty of helping him fleece investors of $17 billion. They were convicted on charges of securities fraud, conspiracy and tax evasion.

4:24pm

Mon March 24, 2014
Technology

Weaned On Youth, Silicon Valley Keeps Older Workers On Sidelines

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish and now to All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

CORNISH: Botox, plastic surgeries, an obsession with youth. We're not talking about Hollywood. That's the new culture of Silicon Valley, according to writer Noam Scheiber. His article for the New Republic is titled "The Brutal Ageism of Tech." And it describes how the infusion of power and money in Silicon Valley has sidelined older workers.

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