All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Pages

3:49pm

Thu June 26, 2014
Politics

Kessner likely to drop challenge to Senator Valesky

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Jean Kessner has gotten her wish and will likely drop her challenge of state Sen. Dave Valesky in Democratic Party primary.

Kessner, a Democrat herself and Syracuse Common Councilor, was circulating petitions to challenge Valesky (D-Oneida), unless he rejoined the mainstream Democrats in the state Senate.

Valesky has been a member of the Independent Democratic Caucus, which controls the Senate along with the minority Republicans, since 2011.

Read more

7:52pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Code Switch

Arrivals And Departures: Films Explore The Immigrant Experience

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:30 pm

Marion Cotillard stars in The Immigrant, director James Gray's film about a Polish woman's experience after she disembarks at Ellis Island.
Anne Joyce Courtesy of the Weinstein Company

Immigrant stories are integral threads in the American narrative. And while there are many monuments and museums that testify to Americans' origins as immigrants, few films do the same.

Read more

5:54pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Europe

For A Spanish Princess, An Indictment On Laundering Charges

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:30 pm

Just days after her brother's coronation, Spanish Princess Infanta Cristina has been charged with money laundering. She faces 11 years behind bars for allegedly embezzling public money through fake charities created with her husband. It will be the first-ever criminal trial of a Spanish royal, and it comes at a time when the monarchy's popularity is at a historic low.

Read more

5:53pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Parallels

Angry At Shiite-Led Government, Sunnis Are Loath To Help Calm Iraq

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:30 pm

A leading Sunni tribal chief, Sheik Abu Ali al-Jubbouri says he misses former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, who favored his sect.
Hussein Malla AP

Iraq is looking increasingly like a state partitioned along sectarian lines. Shiites control the south, but Sunni militants are sweeping through the north and west — and they're doing it with help from local Sunni populations.

Interviews with Sunni leaders show how hard it will be to build the kind of trust needed to put the country back together under one functioning authority.

Read more

5:06pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Sports

A Warning For Soccer Parents: Wait To Let Your Kids Go Headfirst

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:30 pm

A new campaign is working to begin a national conversation on the dangers of heading the ball in youth soccer. To find out more, Melissa Block speaks with former U.S. women's soccer team player Cindy Parlowe Cone, who has grappled with post-concussion syndrome.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Read more

4:40pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Law

Strike Against Utah Gay-Marriage Ban Paves Way For Supreme Court Ruling

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 7:24 am

Peggy Tomsic (center), attorney for three same-sex couples, claps in celebration after the 10th Circuit Court in Denver rejected a same-sex marriage ban in Utah on Wednesday in Salt Lake City.
George Frey Getty Images

A federal appeals court in Denver struck down Utah's ban on gay marriage Wednesday, paving the way for a U.S. Supreme Court decision on the issue as soon as next year. The ruling by the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals was the first by any federal appeals court on the issue to date.

While the ruling struck down the Utah ban, it applies to the other five states in the circuit: New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas and Oklahoma.

Read more

4:15pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Latin America

A World Cup Surprise: Arias In The Heart Of The Amazon

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Of all the Brazilian cities staging games at the World Cup, none is more exotic than Manaus. It's nestled in the heart of the Amazon jungle. You can only get there by plane or boat - an unlikely place to host soccer games. And there's something else in Manaus that's unexpected - a centuries-old theater and opera house. NPR's Russell Lewis took a break from soccer and paid a visit.

RUSSELL LEWIS, BYLINE: The first thing you notice about the Teatro Amazonas is how lovely it is. Then the beauty melts away and it's what you hear.

Read more

4:15pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Remembrances

After 7 Decades A Star Of Stage And Screen, Eli Wallach Dies At 95

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

He played a heck of a bandit and his list of credits highlights a prolific career. Eli Wallach has died the age of 98. Tom Vitale has this look at his long and celebrated career.

TOM VITALE, BYLINE: Eli Wallach was best known for two roles as Mexican outlaws. In 1960 he won acclaim for his portrayal of the bandit Calvera, facing off against the sect head of gunslingers in "The Magnificent Seven."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN")

Read more

3:39pm

Wed June 25, 2014
Politics

Kessner continues to pursue run against Valesky because of IDC alignment

Jean Kessner (far left), looks on as Assemblyman Sam Roberts discusses his support for her possible run against Sen. Dave Valesky (D-Oneida)
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Syracuse Common Councilor Jean Kessner continues collecting petition signatures for a possible Democratic primary run for the state Senate seat held by Dave Valesky (D-Oneida). On Tuesday, Kessner supporters rallied in front of the State Office Building in Syracuse.

Kessner says she only wants to run if Valesky stays aligned with the Independent Democratic Conference, a group of breakaway Democrats that, along with Republicans, control the state Senate.  

Read more

5:49pm

Tue June 24, 2014
Politics

Meet The New Stars Of Campaign Ads: Mom And Dad

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., talks with her father, former New Orleans Mayor Moon Landrieu, on Feb. 1. The two appear together in recent television ads for her re-election campaign.
Gerald Herbert AP

It's the summer of a campaign year and once again the airwaves, the Internet, and likely your own Facebook and other social media feeds are full of political ads.

In the primaries, we've already seen ads featuring cartoon turtles, gator wrestling, lots of dogs, horses and, of course, guns — propped against pickup trucks or resting over shoulders.

Read more

5:38pm

Tue June 24, 2014
All Tech Considered

A New Jersey Law That's Kept Smart Guns Off Shelves Nationwide

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 11:51 am

The Armatix smart gun is implanted with an electronic chip that allows it to be fired only if the shooter is wearing a watch that communicates with it through a radio signal. It is not sold in the U.S.
Michael Dalder Reuters/Landov

A gun that fires only in the hands of its owner isn't science fiction anymore. A so-called smart gun is already on sale in Europe. But you won't find it on store shelves in this country — in part because of an obscure New Jersey law that's had unintended consequences for the rest of the nation.

Basically, the Childproof Handgun Law of 2002 says that once "personalized handguns are available" anywhere in the country, all handguns sold in New Jersey must be smart guns within 30 months.

Read more

5:28pm

Tue June 24, 2014
Deceptive Cadence

New York Philharmonic's Lead Fiddler Rests His Bow

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 11:58 am

Glenn Dicterow joined the New York Philharmonic as its concertmaster in 1980. He has performed as its soloist every year since.
Chris Lee Courtesy of the artist

Most people who attend symphony performances can spot the concertmaster. That's the first chair violinist who enters before the conductor and helps tune the orchestra. But the all important position calls for much more than that — from playing tricky solos to shaping the sound of the string section.

Read more

4:30pm

Tue June 24, 2014
Code Switch

'Freedom Summer' And 'The Watsons': Powerful TV About A Civil Rights Journey

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 4:15 pm

Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegates and supporters stage a demonstration on the boardwalk in front of the Atlantic City Convention Center in 1964.
Courtesy of George Ballis/Take Stock

As part of NPR's "Book Your Trip" series, TV critic Eric Deggans looks at a different kind of summertime journey, described in two books that became TV shows: PBS's documentary Freedom Summer, debuting tonight, and The Hallmark Channel's The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

Read more

4:18pm

Tue June 24, 2014
Asia

In Rift Over Interfaith Ban, A New Fault Line For Burmese Politics

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

Myanmar's parliament is now considering a bill that would restrict marriages of people from different religions. Buddhist nationalists hope it will protect their religion from the spread of Islam and claim it's a way to prevent coerced conversions, but critics lambaste the proposed law as targeting the country's Muslim minority.

Read more

4:15pm

Tue June 24, 2014
Asia

Iraqi Crisis Brings Focus On Indian Migrants Who Seek Profit Amid Peril

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. When ISIS militants took control of wide swaths of northern Iraq, foreign workers in those areas ended up being trapped. India is working to win the release of some 40 of its citizens abducted in the Iraqi city of Mosul. There are also hundreds more in other locations who are clamoring to leave. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

Read more

7:13pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Code Switch

Congressman Rangel Battles For Political Survival

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:13 pm

Rep. Charles Rangel, a Democrat from New York, speaks during a June interview in New York.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Charles Rangel, who for 44 years has represented an Upper Manhattan district that includes Harlem, faces off against three opponents in the New York Democratic primary Tuesday. The most serious challenge comes from state Sen. Adriano Espaillat.

Rangel was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1970, defeating the legendary Adam Clayton Powell Jr. — the first African-American elected to Congress from New York. He has held the seat ever since, rising to power in Washington and at one time serving as head of the powerful Ways and Means Committee.

Read more

6:22pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Book Reviews

Strange And Beautiful Love Stories Light Up 'Paper Lantern'

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:07 pm

"iStockphoto

Like Alice Munro and her small towns of Ontario, Stuart Dybek is a short story writer whose work is often closely associated with a specific place: the working-class neighborhoods of Chicago. But in both cases, referring to the geographical connection doesn't begin to get at the expansiveness of the work. I'd hardly read much Dybek before, and so my understanding of the kind of writing that interests him was limited. I imagined stories that were beautifully written, but beyond that, I didn't know about the strangeness, beauty and engagement with memory that are central to his work.

Read more

6:02pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Men In America

The New American Man Doesn't Look Like His Father

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 11:36 am

While life has changed significantly for American men in the past half-century, notions of masculinity remain tied to those that may have been passed down from this father to the son on his shoulders.
Evans/Three Lions Getty Images

This summer, All Things Considered is exploring what it means to be a man in America today. In some ways, the picture for men has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. More women than men are going to college, and the economy is moving away from jobs that traditionally favored men, like manufacturing and mining. Attitudes have also changed on the social front, with young men having more egalitarian attitudes toward women and expectations of being involved fathers.

Read more

5:02pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Shots - Health News

Pharmaceutical Companies Accuse Hospitals Of Misusing Discounts

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:07 pm

David Chance recuperates at Oregon Health and Science University.
Kristian Foden-Vencil Oregon Public Broadcasting

In 1992, the federal government told drugmakers they had to give steep discounts to hospitals that treat a large percentage of poor patients.

The law got bipartisan support and it was a boon for hospitals and the federal government. In the decades that followed, the discount program has grown by leaps and bounds.

Read more

4:40pm

Mon June 23, 2014
All Tech Considered

Digital Detox, Step 1: Step Away From The Phone

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 11:15 am

Take a break from catching up on social media and emails — even if it's only for a few days.
iStockphoto

The summer months are upon us again. It's the season to sit outside, decompress and finally put those accumulated sick days to good use: It's vacation season.

Vacation traditionally means taking a break from all of the stresses, worries and routines of our daily lives. We put the work down in order to pick up a cool drink and a new novel.

So let's make sure we have everything:

Flip-flops? Check.

Suntan lotion? Check.

Cellphone? Laptop? iPad? Hmm.

Read more

4:30pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Music Interviews

To The Left, To The Left: Behind The Beyoncelogues

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:07 pm

YouTube

For more conversations with music-makers, check out NPR's Music Interviews.

Read more

4:24pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Politics

In Oklahoma Senate Race, A Choice Between Two Deep Shades Of Red

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:07 pm

State Rep. T.W. Shannon (left) talks with U.S. Rep. James Lankford following a June 6 Republican candidate forum for the open U.S. Senate seat in Lawton, Okla.
Sue Ogrocki AP

In Oklahoma, Republicans will vote Tuesday on a nominee to finish the term of current GOP Sen. Tom Coburn, who is retiring at year-end with two years left to spare. For the two front-runners, Rep. James Lankford and former state House Speaker T.W. Shannon, immigration has suddenly become an issue in the race.

Read more

4:07pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Middle East

World's Chemical Weapons Watchdog Clears Syria

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more

4:07pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Health

Are Life Spans Getting Longer? It Depends On How Wealthy You Are

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 8:07 pm

While life expectancies are getting longer for those who are well off, life spans for poor women are actually getting shorter. The stories of two women, from two very different places, illustrate the reasons for the gap.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more

5:45pm

Sun June 22, 2014
Politics

Congress Keeping Close Watch On Obama's Plans In Iraq

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 6:25 pm

President Obama pauses while speaking about the situation in Iraq on Thursday. Obama said the U.S. will send up to 300 military advisers to Iraq and set up joint operation centers.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

After bowing out of Iraq when the last American forces left two and a half years ago, the U.S. military is back.

Up to 300 military advisers started arriving there this weekend. President Obama said he sent them to help Iraq's military confront the Sunni militants who've overrun much of northern Iraq. He said Thursday that U.S. would not take on another combat role in Iraq, but he didn't rule out all types of military support.

Read more

5:09pm

Sun June 22, 2014
World

With Changes To Guantanamo Trials, A New Feel To Proceedings

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 6:25 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more

5:09pm

Sun June 22, 2014
Europe

Eastern Ukraine Torn By Allegations Of Cease-Fire Violations

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 6:25 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more

5:09pm

Sun June 22, 2014
Business

Puma's Pink And Blue Cleats Make A Bold Play At The World Cup

Originally published on Sun June 22, 2014 6:25 pm

Italy's Mario Balotelli sports Puma's new evoPOWER Tricks cleats.
Frank Augstein AP

Athletes aren't the only ones battling for supremacy on the World Cup pitch: Shoe brands are fighting for glory, too.

For the most part, it's the fluorescent Nike Vapors versus the Adidas Adizero Battle Pack cleats. But while those brands dominate the soccer market, Kyle Stock of Bloomberg Businessweek says Puma has a counterattack: the mismatched pink and blue soccer cleats called Tricks.

"You see a lot of yellows out there and oranges and reds, but in the blur of the feet, you notice [the Tricks]," Stock tells NPR's Arun Rath.

Read more

6:19pm

Sat June 21, 2014

6:19pm

Sat June 21, 2014
Digital Life

On Display At Video Game Showcase: A Struggle For Diversity

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more

Pages