All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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8:11pm

Tue June 18, 2013
Shots - Health News

House Passes Bill That Would Ban Abortions After 20 Weeks

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 8:43 pm

Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., was chosen by House Republican leaders to manage a bill that would ban many abortions.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The House has passed one of the most far-reaching abortion bills in decades. But it's unlikely to ever become law.

By a mostly party-line vote Tuesday of 228-196, lawmakers passed the "Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act," which would ban nearly all abortions starting 20 weeks after fertilization.

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8:08pm

Tue June 18, 2013
Code Switch

How The Civil Rights Movement Was Covered In Birmingham

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 1:47 pm

A 17-year-old Civil Rights demonstrator is attacked by a police dog in Birmingham, Ala., on May 3, 1963. This image led the front page of the next day's New York Times.
Bill Hudson ASSOCIATED PRESS

As the Civil Rights Movement was unfolding across the US in 1963, the entire nation had its eyes on climactic events taking place in Southern cities like Birmingham, Ala., and Jackson, Miss. But there's a stark difference between how the national press covered the events in Birmingham and how Birmingham's papers covered their own city.

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6:42pm

Tue June 18, 2013
Education

Home-Schooled Students Fight To Play On Public School Teams

Advocates of allowing home-schooled students to play on public school teams have dubbed legislation allowing it "Tim Tebow bills," after the former NFL quarterback who was home-schooled in Florida.
Stephen Brashear AP

Legislative battles are being fought around the country over whether or not to let home-schooled students play on public high school teams.

Roughly half of U.S. states have passed laws making them eligible to play on the teams. Advocates have dubbed them "Tim Tebow bills," after the NFL quarterback who was home-schooled when he played on a high school team.

But an attempt by Indiana to find a middle ground may not have solved the problem in that state.

Somewhere In The Middle

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6:32pm

Tue June 18, 2013
Architecture

Change Is On The Horizon For London's Famous Skyline

London's 122 Leadenhall Street (nicknamed the "Cheese-Grater") is shown under construction on March 5. Once complete it will be London's second-tallest building. The recent construction of numerous skyscrapers has sparked concern that views of historic landmark buildings, such as St Paul's Cathedral, are being obscured.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

Cities are defined by their skylines — while Paris is composed mostly of low-rise apartment buildings, New York is a city of tall office towers. But London is a city in transition. On Tuesday, Boris Johnson, the mayor of the British capital, attends a "topping out" ceremony for one of London's latest skyscrapers in a city where tall buildings cause a lot of controversy.

Until recently, London has been a low-rise city.
 Even now, a 12-story building is considered rather tall.
 But a spate of new skyscrapers is raising questions about the kind of city London should be.

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5:33pm

Tue June 18, 2013
History

A Look Back At How Newspapers Covered The Civil Rights Movement

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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5:06pm

Tue June 18, 2013
Shots - Health News

Patients Lead The Way As Medicine Grapples With Apps

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 10:39 pm

How many calories in that bite? My Fitness Pal and other fitness and nutrition apps can help find the answer.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Christine Porter is hooked on the MyFitnessPal app. In October, after deciding to lose 50 pounds, Porter started typing in everything she eats, drinks and any exercise she gets.

"This is my main page here," says Porter. "It's telling me I have about 1,200 calories remaining for the day. When I want to record something I just click the 'add to diary' button. I'm on it all day either through my phone or through the computer."

She says she's lost 42 pounds in nine months.

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4:38pm

Tue June 18, 2013
NPR Story

Congressman On NSA: Checks And Balances Prevent Abuse

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

After today's hearing, I spoke with one of the members of the House intelligence committee, Republican Mac Thornberry of Texas. He has defended the NSA's surveillance programs as both legal and vital to security. I asked if anything about the amassing of millions of Americans' phone records troubles him.

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4:38pm

Tue June 18, 2013
NPR Story

Immigration Reform Bill Under Republican Pressure

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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3:52pm

Tue June 18, 2013
All Tech Considered

Mexico's Tech Startups Look To Overcome Barriers To Growth

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

Enrique Lima is a co-founder of Publish 88, a Mexican startup that develops software for publishing companies.
Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

In the past decade, Mexico's tech industry has flourished, growing three times faster than the global average. Most of that growth has been fueled by demand from the United States. But as Mexico's startups strive to make it in foreign markets, they say they need more engineers and ways to finance their growth.

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1:42pm

Tue June 18, 2013
Music Reviews

Kanye's 'Yeezus' Packs A Bite

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 6:18 pm

Kanye West at his album listening party at Milk Studios last week in New York City.
Shareif Ziyadat FilmMagic

6:40pm

Mon June 17, 2013
The Salt

Dirty Spuds? Alleged Potato Cartel Accused Of Price Fixing

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 4:09 pm

Clearly, he's as surprised by the allegations as the rest of us.
iStockphoto.com

Editor's Note: Many of you noted that the price for a 10-pound bag of potatoes cited in the lawsuit seems ridiculously high. So we look into the matter further — you can read what we found in this follow-up post.

High-tech spying with satellites. Intimidation. Price fixing.

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5:45pm

Mon June 17, 2013
Code Switch

How Do You Teach The Civil Rights Movement?

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 9:37 pm

A protestor is carried away from a demonstration in Jacksonville 50 years ago.
Jim Bourdier AP

Note: As part of NPR's series on the summer of 1963, reporter Cory Turner headed to Jackson, Miss. to take a look at how folks are teaching the Civil Rights movement to kids who weren't a part of it — and making the lessons stick.

Much has changed in the past 50 years, since the height of the Civil Rights movement. But how do you teach the Civil Rights to kids who haven't ever experienced it? In Jackson, Miss., Fannie Lou Hamer Institute's Summer Youth Workshop tackles that question.

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5:45pm

Mon June 17, 2013
Monkey See

Teens Find The Right Tools For Their Social-Media Jobs

When you need to illustrate a story about proliferating social-media platforms, it's good to know that an enterprising stock photographer has probably thought about it already.
Anatoliy Babiy iStockphoto.com

Once upon a time, it was MySpace. (Huh. Turns out you can still link to it.) Then Facebook happened. And Twitter. And beyond those two dominant social-media platforms, there are a host of other, newer options for staying in touch and letting the digital universe get a look at your life. And for certain kinds of sharing, some of those other options make more sense to tech-savvy teens than the Big Two do.

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5:45pm

Mon June 17, 2013
Shots - Health News

The Human Voice May Not Spark Pleasure In Children With Autism

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 11:31 am

Instructional assistant Jessica Reeder touches her nose to get Jacob Day, 3, who has autism, to focus his attention on her during a therapy session in April 2007.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

The human voice appears to trigger pleasure circuits in the brains of typical kids, but not children with autism, a Stanford University team reports. The finding could explain why many children with autism seem indifferent to spoken words.

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1:27pm

Mon June 17, 2013
The Salt

Italian University Spreads The 'Gelato Gospel'

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 4:12 pm

Thousands of students from around the world flock to courses near Bologna, in central Italy, at the headquarters of Carpigiani, the leading global manufacturer of gelato-making machines.
Giuseppe Cacace AFP/Getty Images

Italy has secured its place in the global diet with the likes of espresso, cappuccino, pasta and pizza.

The latest addition to the culinary lexicon is ... gelato, the Italian version of ice cream.

And despite tough economic times, gelato-making is a booming business.

At Anzola dell'Emilia, a short drive from the Italian city of Bologna, people from all over the world are lining up for courses in gelato-making.

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5:56pm

Sun June 16, 2013
National Security

Privacy Past And Present: A Saga Of American Ambivalence

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:17 pm

Protesters gather outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday to rally against the National Security Agency's recently detailed surveillance programs.
Win McNamee Getty Images

America's privacy concerns go back to the origins of the country itself.

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5:02pm

Sun June 16, 2013
Author Interviews

A Posthumous Tribute To Guns From A Sniper Shot To Death

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:17 pm

Firearms designer John Browning submitted this design for the M1911 pistol to the U.S. Patent Office in September 1910.
Courtesy William Morrow

A killing on a Texas gun range in February captured the headlines. The victim was Chris Kyle, considered by many to be the most deadly sniper in American military history.

The man who admitted to killing him was a veteran as well — a young, disturbed man who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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3:58pm

Sun June 16, 2013
Music Interviews

'Glee' Guy Matthew Morrison On His First Love: Broadway

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:22 pm

Matthew Morrison's musical life didn't start on TV; the Glee star is a Tony-nominated stage actor. Where It All Began is his second album of show tunes and standards.
Courtesy of the artist

Long before became known as Will Schuester — the lovable Spanish teacher and show choir director on TV's Glee — Matthew Morrison was dancing and singing, garnering Tony nods for his work on the Broadway stage.

Through it all, there was one song he always kept at the ready: "On the Street Where You Live" from My Fair Lady.

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3:54pm

Sun June 16, 2013
Author Interviews

Dr. Brazelton On Guiding Parents And Learning To Listen

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:17 pm

For the better part of the past century, Dr. T. Berry Brazelton has studied babies, helping change the way we think about and care for them — right from the time they take their first breaths.

The renowned pediatrician hosted the long-running TV show What Every Baby Knows, and has written more than 30 books about child development. Hospitals worldwide rely on his newborn assessment known as the Brazelton scale.

At age 95, he's still going strong.

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6:25pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Around the Nation

Water Wars: Who Controls The Flow?

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 7:39 pm

Cattle stand in a heavily irrigated pasture in Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin. The state has ordered ranchers in the region to shut down irrigation. The move is aimed at protecting the rights of Indian tribes who live downstream.
Amelia Templeton for NPR

So often, we take water for granted. We turn on the faucet and there it is. We assume it's our right in America to have water. And yet, water is a resource. It's not always where we need it, or there when we need it.

Rivers don't follow political boundaries — they flow through states and over international borders. And there are endless demands for water: for agriculture, drinking, plumbing, manufacturing, to name just a few. And then there's the ecosystem that depends on water getting downstream.

So what are our legal rights when it comes to water? And who decides?

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5:03pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Around the Nation

Fighting Unwanted Cat Calls, One Poster At A Time

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

New York artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh uses posters to combat unwanted cat calls and attention from men in her neighborhood.
Courtesy of Tatayana Fazlalizadeh

It's hard to go unnoticed in New York City, with everyone checking out the latest fashions and hairstyles. As the weather warms, some women who are shedding those winter layers are finding themselves the object of more cat calls, whistles and roving eyes than they'd like.

Artist Tatayana Fazlalizadeh is not going to take it anymore.

Under the cover of darkness, wearing a black knit hit, black leather jacket and black Chuck Taylors, Fazlalizadeh is nearly invisible. She's scouring Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, for a blank canvas.

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5:03pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Author Interviews

Telling Stories About Ourselves In 'The Faraway Nearby'

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

Brian Jackson iStockphoto.com

Rebecca Solnit begins her new memoir, The Faraway Nearby, with a question: "What's your story?"

"It's all in the telling," she says. "Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and prisons out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of the world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice."

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5:03pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Middle East

Obama's Dilemma: Arming The Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

The White House is taking its first tentative steps toward arming Syrian rebels. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent with The Atlantic, about the U.S.' ongoing struggle to determine when is the right time to intercede. They also discuss moderate candidate Hasan Rowhani's victory in the Iranian presidential election.

4:43pm

Sat June 15, 2013
Music Interviews

Terence Blanchard Turns A Tragic Champion Into An Opera Hero

Originally published on Sat June 15, 2013 6:19 pm

Terence Blanchard is one of today's foremost jazz composers.
Nitin Vadukul Courtesy of the artist

1:04pm

Sat June 15, 2013
The Picture Show

Pakistani Photographers Take A Personal Picture Of Pakistan

Originally published on Thu June 20, 2013 10:35 am

A young man stitches decorative seat covers and curtains in Rawalpindi, where he works for more than 12 hours a day.
Noor Za Din

Last year, National Geographic offered a photo camp for emerging Pakistani photographers to explore the tribal areas of their country.

Seventeen photographers spent six days around Islamabad learning to tell stories with photos.

And just this week, a selection of those photos were on display at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C., in an exhibit called Pakistan Through Our Eyes.

A few of the photographers joined NPR's Jacki Lyden to discuss their experiences.

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6:12pm

Fri June 14, 2013
Shots - Health News

Rule Would List All Chimps As Endangered, Even Lab Animals

Originally published on Tue June 18, 2013 9:45 am

Chimpanzee Toni celebrated his 50th birthday at the Hellabrunn Zoo in Munich on Nov. 22, 2011.
Sven Hoppe DPA/Landov

This week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed a new rule that would extend "endangered species" protections to chimpanzees held in captivity. Nearly half of all the chimps in the U.S. live in research facilities, and the regulation changes would make it more difficult to use these animals in medical experiments.

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5:28pm

Fri June 14, 2013
Business

Housing Market Watchers Edgy As Mortgage Rates Keep Climbing

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:12 pm

Home values have been rising in recent months, but mortgage rates have taken a rapid turn upward as well. Some investors are worried that the housing recovery may stall if mortgage rates jump too quickly.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Mortgage rates have seen a relatively sharp rise this month. The average 30-year fixed-rate loan hit 4 percent earlier in June — a big jump from the record lows of recent years. Some investors are now concerned that the housing recovery could be stifled if rates continue to rise quickly.

The Federal Reserve has two main missions: to maximize employment and minimize inflation. Right now, there are few, if any, signs that prices for goods are spiking, and the job market is still crawling out of its long, deep slump.

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5:23pm

Fri June 14, 2013
Code Switch

11-Year-Old Keeps Singing In Face Of Hate

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 7:59 pm

Sebastien de la Cruz gave an encore performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" before the NBA Finals game on Thursday.
David J. Phillip AP

It's not often an 11-year-old boy gets to sing the national anthem twice during the NBA Finals.

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4:44pm

Fri June 14, 2013
NPR Story

Pentagon Hopes Brain Tissue Research Will Help Prevent Injuries

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:12 pm

More than 260,000 cases of traumatic brain injury have been reported by American service members sent to Iraq and Afghanistan. Now the Department of Defense has created a tissue bank where the brains of deceased service members will be studied, in an effort to treat and prevent brain injury from combat. Melissa Block speaks with the director of the brain tissue repository, Dr. Daniel Perl.

4:44pm

Fri June 14, 2013
NPR Story

Some Turkish Protesters Optimistic After Meeting With Leaders

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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