All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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4:47pm

Thu March 20, 2014
Around the Nation

Rural Appalachia Helps Some Women Save For Retirement

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 5:22 pm

Anita Wallace runs a child care service in rural Athens County, Ohio. She hadn't saved much for retirement before the Appalachian Savings Project offered to match half of her savings up to $600.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Anita Wallace has run a day care in her home in rural Athens County, Ohio, for eight years. The schedule is more family-friendly than when she logged 60 hours a week as a manager at Wal-Mart, and the pay is about $27,000 a year — not bad for the area.

Wallace adores the children, getting down on the floor to let toddlers snuggle on her shoulder. But Wallace, 40, and her husband, 47, also have three of their own kids to raise.

"They're very expensive!" she says, laughing, as her own children — two still live at home — inform her of the new track uniforms they need.

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4:47pm

Thu March 20, 2014
Shots - Health News

Never Mind Eyesight, Your Nose Knows Much More

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 8:14 am

Your schnoz deserves more respect.
epSos .de/Flickr

The human eye can distinguish more than 2 million distinct colors. But scientists studying smell now say they have their vision colleagues beat: The human nose, they say, can distinguish more than a trillion different smells.

Yes, trillion with a T.

That new figure displaces a much more modest estimate. Until now, smell researchers have been saying the human nose can distinguish about 10,000 smells.

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4:47pm

Thu March 20, 2014
Found Recipes

This Simple Stew Is A Battleground In A Bowl

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 12:10 pm

John Currence and Punish Stew may share a checkered past, but so many people in his life have loved this easy, hearty soup, he can't help but love it too — or at least act like he does.
iStockphoto

Ask award-winning chef John Currence for a comfort food recipe, and you may hear him tell a story filled with a hefty share of discomfort. In his cookbook, Pickles, Pigs & Whiskey, he shares a simple, hearty soup that he's taken to calling "my purgatory on Earth — I love to hate it, and I hate to love it." For short, he calls it Punish Stew.

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3:10pm

Thu March 20, 2014
Education

Syracuse leaders come together to advocate for pre-K funding

Supporters of pre-K, including Syracuse Common Councilor Nader Maroun, hold up banner at news conference Thursday.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Syracuse-area advocates of universal pre-kindergarten want lawmakers to include it in the state budget expected to be approved in Albany in the next ten days. Supporters crystallized their argument for pre-K  at a news conference at Delaware School on Syracuse’s west side Thursday.

The call to  include universal pre-K in the state budget came from business leaders, like Centerstate CEO president Rob Simpson

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6:05pm

Wed March 19, 2014
Around the Nation

Long, Hot Winter Puts Western Fire Officials On Edge

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:16 pm

Flames approach the Blakiston Ranch in California last May during the Springs fire. It eventually torched more than 24,000 acres.
David McNew Getty Images

The view from atop Conejo Mountain is postcard-worthy. It's 360 degrees of Southern California: mountains, coastline, cookie-cutter homes.

But if you look closer, the greens, blues and browns of Conejo are charred away, burnt a charcoal black.

Mike Lindbery, a captain with the Ventura County Fire Department, was here on this mountain last spring when a wildfire raced up the hillside on its way to torching more than 24,000 acres.

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4:31pm

Wed March 19, 2014
News

In First Press Conference, New Fed Chair Goes Vague

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Federal Reserve policymakers say it's not your imagination, there has been an economic slowdown over the past few months. The pullback was partly due to the harsh winter weather. And today was Fed chair Janet Yellen's first opportunity to face the Washington press corps at the end of a two-day meeting.

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4:31pm

Wed March 19, 2014
Sports

Far From Home, South Sudanese Basketballer Finds Footing On Court

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

In three years, Mooseheart High School's basketball team went from also-ran to champion. One of the reasons? Mangisto Deng, a 6-foot-7-inch player from South Sudan. He tells of his journey and team.

4:31pm

Wed March 19, 2014
Technology

U.S. Pulls Out Of ICANN — What Does That Spell For Internet Users?

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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3:46pm

Wed March 19, 2014
Education

Utica City School District discusses layoffs to help balance budget

The Utica City School District is looking at another year of layoffs, though the final budget has not been completed.
Gino Geruntino WRVO

For the fourth straight year, the Utica City School District is facing a deficit, causing the school board to consider layoffs. School Business Official Maureen Albanese says right now the district, which is among the state's poorest, is having trouble balancing its nearly $146 million budget.

"We had a $3.8 million deficit in the general fund, and we're looking at a $2.6 [million] deficit in our federal grants, which brought our total budget deficit to $6.4 million," Albanese said.

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5:00pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Theater

Deepwater, Center-Stage: Disaster Through Survivors' Eyes

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:50 pm

Gary Barthelmy, Oyster Fisherman is a portrait by Reeva Wortel, used in conjunction with the production of Spill, a play that runs through March 30 at the Swine Palace in Baton Rouge.
Reeva Wortel

Eleven died and hundreds of millions of gallons of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico when BP's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in 2010. But beneath the tragedy, there's a complex story about people's relationships to oil. That's what's explored in Spill, a new play by one of the creators of The Laramie Project.

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4:21pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Around the Nation

Report: Emergency Response Inadequate In Airport Shooting

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Bad communication, faulty technology, and poor planning - those are just some of the issues highlighted in a report about the deadly shooting last year at Los Angeles International Airport. A TSA worker was killed in that attack and three people were wounded. NPR's Nathan Rott has more.

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4:21pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Law

Nevada Court Quagmire Waits — And Waits — For Voters To Solve It

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The courts are clogged in Nevada. The state's Supreme Court says it is the busiest in the country. Nevada is one of just 10 states without an intermediate appeals court. A proposal to create one is on the ballot this fall.

And as Will Stone of Reno Public Radio reports, voters have rejected that idea in the past.

WILL STONE, BYLINE: On a given day, Barbara Buckley sees just about any kind of legal issue out there.

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2:35pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Fishing

Fish stocking program boosting Lake Ontario's viability

Fishers on the Salmon River, a tributary to Lake Ontario.
David Chanatry/New York State Reporting Project

Lake Ontario is boasting some of the best sport fishing among the Great Lakes, thanks to a successful stocking program by New York state's environmental management agency.

The Department of Environmental Conservation pumps ample supplies of trout and salmon into Lake Ontario and its tributaries every year. It attracts anglers from all over -- more than 2.5 million each season.

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5:15pm

Mon March 17, 2014
Politics and Government

Schumer calls for more airline passport checks

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) during his visit to Syracuse Monday.

As the search continues for a missing Malaysian Airlines plane, Sen. Charles Schumer is proposing legislation that would close what he calls a "major gap" in airline security, exposed because of the incident.   
Schumer notes that two passengers on the plane got on board using stolen passports, apparently very easily. And he says most countries don’t require airlines to check the Interpol database to see if passports are stolen.

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4:30pm

Mon March 17, 2014
All Tech Considered

With Google's Robot-Buying Binge, A Hat Tip To The Future

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 8:56 pm

A BigDog robot at Boston Dynamics in 2010. The BigDog is being developed to help soldiers carry heavy equipment in the field. It can follow a human being, walking across wet/sandy/rocky terrain, just like a dog would.
Suzanne Kreiter Boston Globe via Getty Images

In less than a year, Google has bought more than a half-dozen robotics companies, setting the industry abuzz. But when I ask Google what it's up to with all these robots, the company won't say a thing.

"They are very careful — they haven't disclosed what they are doing," says Richard Mahoney, the director of the robotics program at SRI International, a nonprofit technology accelerator in Menlo Park, Calif. Mahoney also served on the board of Redwood Robotics, one of the companies Google bought.

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4:30pm

Mon March 17, 2014
Parallels

A Syrian Refugee Camp With Girl Scouts And A Safeway Store

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 8:57 pm

An informal Girl Scout group at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan sings: "We want to learn and rise up to fulfill our dreams."
Nabih Bulos NPR

On a sunny afternoon in the dusty, overcrowded Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, a group of Syrian girls recites a familiar pledge and hope to change their future. The youngsters promise to serve God and country, to help people at all times and live by the laws of the Girl Scouts.

The troop was organized by Hanna Vazquez, a volunteer with Mercy Corps, a U.S.-based humanitarian group.

"We are going to do the Girl Scout music badge," she says, as the girls gather around.

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4:30pm

Mon March 17, 2014
Europe

The Ukrainian Reaction To Secession And Sanctions

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 6:33 pm

Following Sunday's referendum in Crimea, Robert Siegel speaks with the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Geoffrey Pyatt, to find out his reaction to the vote in favor of secession.

6:40pm

Sun March 16, 2014
Music

Ambrose Akinmusire: 'Music Can Tell You What It Wants To Be'

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 11:02 am

Ambrose Akinmusire's latest album is the imagined savior is far easier to paint.
Autumn DeWilde Courtesy of the artist

For a jazz trumpet player, you couldn't be more on top of the world than Ambrose Akinmusire. The 32-year-old is looking good on the cover of this month's DownBeat, and he's managed to please the jazz critics and connect with audiences.

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6:35pm

Sun March 16, 2014
Book Reviews

Novel Reflects Desperate But Futile Search For Answers

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

All week, NPR has been reporting on the missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370. And to help us make sense of the news, we turn now to literature. Here's author Jonathan Evison.

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6:35pm

Sun March 16, 2014
Digital Life

Christian Missionaries 'Called Together' By Online Dating Site

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

It seems these days, there's a dating site for everyone.

(SOUNDBITE OF BLACKPEOPLEMEET.COM COMMERCIAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: At the largest dating site for black singles, BlackPeopleMeet.com.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHRISTIANMINGLE.COM COMMERCIAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Joining is easy and free. Find God's match for you at ChristianMingle.com.

(SOUNDBITE OF OURTIME.COM COMMERCIAL AD)

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5:55pm

Sun March 16, 2014
National Security

Uniform Rule May Keep Religious Americans From Military Service

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:23 pm

Dr. Kamal Kalsi had to apply for special permission from the Department of Defense in order to keep his beard and turban while serving in the military.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Monday, 105 lawmakers from both parties sent a letter to Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, urging him to change a relatively obscure uniform requirement for the U.S. armed forces that some argue infringes on religious beliefs.

People who observe religions that require specific hair or dress traditions have to seek an accommodation from a superior to break the Defense Department's uniform requirements.

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5:33pm

Sat March 15, 2014
Sports

Predicting Top Seeds For March Madness 2014

It's the most wonderful time of the year for NCAA college basketball fans. NPR's Arun Rath talks with A Martinez of member station KPCC about March Madness.

5:33pm

Sat March 15, 2014
Politics

CIA Pulled Out Of The Shadows With Feinstein's Charge

Sen. Dianne Feinstein accused CIA staff of improperly accessing Senate computers on Tuesday. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times and ex-Rep. Jane Harman about the conflict.

5:33pm

Sat March 15, 2014
Middle East

Reflecting On 3-Year Syrian War: 'There But For The Grace Of God'

Saturday is the three-year anniversary of the war in Syria. Nigel Timmins of Oxfam talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the humanitarian crisis there and the Syrian people he has met.

5:35pm

Fri March 14, 2014
This Week's Must Read

Malaysia Flight 370 And The World's Attention

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 6:33 pm

A Vietnamese Air Force plane returns from a search operation over Vietnam's southern sea.
HOANG DINH NAM AFP/Getty Images

It's been a week since the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight 370, a week filled with misinformation, wild theorizing and the anxiety of the passengers' families. The story, and especially its lack of information, has the world watching and wondering.

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5:35pm

Fri March 14, 2014
Movie Interviews

Rapper, Mother, Superstar: Ana Tijoux Finds Her Words

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 6:33 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Since you listened to NPR, you probably know by now that this week is the South by Southwest Music Festival. Among the performers is Ana Tijoux.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BLOCK: Tijoux is one of the most influential hip hop artists in Latin America. Here in the U.S., fans of the TV show "Breaking Bad" might recognize this song of hers.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "1977")

ANA TIJOUX: (Singing in foreign language)

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5:35pm

Fri March 14, 2014
Remembrances

A Fond Farewell For The Voice That Welcomed Viewers To Theaters

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 6:33 pm

Voiceover artist Hal Douglas died recently at age 89. Filmmaker Casimir Nozkowski discusses the life and work of the prolific speaker, who narrated thousands of movie trailers in a gravelly baritone.

2:35pm

Fri March 14, 2014
Regional Coverage

Hunger increasing in central and northern New York

The number of people who are hungry in central and northern New York is climbing. The latest survey from the Food Bank of Central New York shows an increase in food requests as well as some changes in the kinds of people who are asking for help.

At the height of the recession in 2008-2009, the Food Bank of Central New York saw a 12 percent increase in the number of meals requested across its 11-county service area. Those numbers stabilized, but now they are going back up -- climbing seven percent last year.   

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2:22pm

Fri March 14, 2014
Regional Coverage

Oswego County Legislature votes to oppose Cuomo's tax freeze plan

Gino Geruntino WRVO

The Oswego County Legislature is joining several other counties across New York to oppose Gov. Andrew Cuomo's proposed property tax freeze plan. They voted to support another option proposed by the New York State Association of Counties, to eliminate the cost of state funded mandates instead. The final vote was 16 to 8, with 1 absentee.

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6:43pm

Thu March 13, 2014
Around the Nation

A Terrible Winter Wreaks Havoc On Roads, Pipes And City Budgets

Potholes on Chicago's Lake Shore Drive, one of which is about half-a-car-length long and at least a foot deep. The city of Chicago says it has filled an estimated 240,000 potholes this winter, 100,000 more than last winter, at a cost of more than $2.8 million.
David Schaper NPR

Bitter cold has returned to parts of the Midwest, mid-Atlantic and Northeast, following another heavy snowstorm that left 1 to 2 feet of snow from Ohio to New England.

And when all this snow finally melts, it'll expose the physical toll of this brutal winter: potholes, broken water mains, collapsed catch basins and other infrastructure problems.

"This winter's crazy, crazy busy," says John Polishak, a foreman for the Chicago Department of Water Management. "Everybody's been working 16 hours a day, seven days a week. It's exhausting."

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