HealthLink on Air

Sundays at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.
  • Hosted by Amber Smith

“HealthLink on Air” is a 60-minute program produced since 2006 by Upstate Medical University, the academic medical center in Syracuse, NY.

“HealthLink on Air” provides a weekly dose of information on health and medical issues affecting central New Yorkers. The program showcases health professionals and researchers from Upstate Medical University, Upstate University Hospital, the central New York community and those visiting the region who are involved with health care issues and events. The interviews are permanently archived online.

For more information, visit the HealthLink on Air website.

Ways to Connect

This week, Dr. Leonard Weiner explains a mysterious polio-like illness affecting children in California.

Plus, Cristina Pope weighed nearly 250 pounds when she decided to get serious about losing weight. Within a year she shed more than 100 pounds by carefully watching her nutrition intake and working out regularly. Now, almost two years later, she's kept the weight off.

We'll share her secrets to success, which include exercising in a variety of ways and eating plenty of vegetables.

This week: how lubricants affect fertility

Mar 14, 2014
Upstate University Hospital

Couples trying to conceive may be surprised to learn that many sexual lubricants act as spermicides, reducing their changes of pregnancy.

Several commercial products and household oils are harmful to sperm and can slow the movement of sperm, according to a study conducted through the andrology laboratory at Upstate Medical University. We'll discuss the study and it's implications with the director of andrology services, Kazim Chohan, and Dr. Renee Mestad.

Then, Dr. Antonia Culebras explains how to reduce stroke risk for people with irregular heartbeats.

Upstate University Hospital

For a woman in her late 40s to early 60s, just hearing a healthcare provider assure that "you're not alone, and you're not going crazy," can be a source of comfort.

Heather Shannon, director of the midwifery program at Upstate Medical University, says that the end of childbearing years for many women comes with a multitude of symptoms: hot flashes and night sweats, depression or anxiety and mood swings. Also during this time, women may develop problems with their thyroid and/or adrenal glands. It can leave women frustrated.

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