Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

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Karen DeWitt / WRVO News File Photo

The state Legislature is off this week, but the session so far has featured an unusual amount of protests and arrests, and more actions are expected when lawmakers return. 

Twice in the first few weeks of the 2017 legislative session, protesters have been arrested at the state Capitol.

Eight people were arrested in late January. They were demonstrating against Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s veto of a bill that would have provided funding for legal services for indigent New Yorkers.

“We want lawyers!” they shouted.

Host Alex Trebek Raps 'Jeopardy!' Category

Feb 21, 2017

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(SOUNDBITE OF MERV GRIFFIN'S "THINK!")

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. I hope you were watching "Jeopardy!" last night. The category was Let's Rap, Kids. Contestants made a choice. Host Alex Trebek rapped the answer.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "JEOPARDY!")

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Now the story of how one Mexican artist is trying to revive Spanish-language bookstores here in the U.S. Simon Rios reports from member station WBUR in Boston.

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In Canada, humanitarians ask: Is the U.S. still safe for refugees?

Feb 21, 2017
Jimmy Emerson / Flickr

Several aid organizations and pro-immigrant groups are pressuring the Canadian government to pull out of a controversial program which turns away almost all refugees coming in through the United States.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

Dan White of Apalachin is a freshman at SUNY Broome, near Binghamton. At first, he thought about attending the University of Buffalo, but decided to live at home, save money, and work at a local Subway sandwich shop. Dan admits he thought college would be like a harder version of high school. But it was definitely tougher than that.

"It was just kinda new for me, you know, trying to figure out how to study and all that," he said. "Then all of the sudden in one of my classes, you know, I get an email...and it's just like, 'hey you're doing a really good job!'"

WRVO News / File Photo

Syracuse City Auditor Marty Masterpole is among several Democrats looking for enough party support to be the democratic nominee in the race for mayor of Syracuse. 

Masterpole, 43, has one thing other declared candidates for mayor of Syracuse don’t have: legislative experience in both the Onondaga County Legislature and the Syracuse Common Council. And he suggests that, along with six years as city auditor, makes him a candidate who can make deals with anyone from developers to other governments.

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Presidents Day is a time to reflect on the giants. Lincoln. Jefferson. Washington.

And of course, mattress sales.

"You go hunting when the ducks are flying," says Kevin Damewood, the executive vice president of sales and marketing at Kingsdown, a mattress manufacturer.

He says three-day weekends are when people have time to shop for a new mattress. It's also when many people decide to move, and consequently when many people are in the market for a new mattress.

Copyright 2017 Classical New England. To see more, visit Classical New England.

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Malaysia and North Korea are wrangling over whether a man who died at the Kuala Lumpur airport last week is indeed Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Among the many countries trying to figure out what to make of it is North Korea's neighbor and sole ally, China.

Officially, China has said little except that it is closely monitoring the situation. But in China, Kim Jong Nam's apparent assassination has triggered a debate about what it means and how to respond.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

A leading budget watchdog group is accusing Gov. Andrew Cuomo of fudging the numbers in his state budget to appear to stay within his self-imposed two percent per-year spending cap.

Ellen Abbott

Researchers at SUNY Upstate Medical University continue to work on ways to better diagnose, and treat, ALS, a deadly neurodegenerative disease that affects the nerve cells of the brain and spinal cord.

Upstate ALS Research and Treatment Center Director Eufrosina Young says studies center on something called transcranial magnetic stimulation. It helps doctors connect what’s happening in the brain with what’s happening in other parts of the body, in a disease that can often be difficult to diagnose and treat.

The Environmental Protection Agency has a pretty simple mission in principle: to protect human health and the environment. It's a popular purpose too. Nearly three out of four U.S. adults believe the country "should do whatever it takes to protect the environment," according to a 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center.

Political support for the EPA, though, is less effusive.

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Congressman Elijah Cummings has questions, questions about President Trump's administration.

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It is Cummings' job to ask. He is the top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

At a time when refugees are mired in political debate, one Syracuse elementary school held a rally to support for its refugee population.

Making a case against sugar

Feb 17, 2017
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Scientific evidence continues to grow about the negative impacts of consuming sugar. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with investigative science journalist Gary Taubes. Taubes is the author of the new book "The Case against Sugar" and argues that sugar is as unhealthy as smoking.

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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Monopoly, the board game, is getting a revamp. Makers of the game want to pick the next generation of game pieces, you know, the car, the battleship, the top hat.

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Keep it upside down for luck.

This weekend marks 75 years since President Roosevelt's executive order that sent Japanese-Americans to internment camps.

Roy Ebihara and his wife, 82-year-old Aiko, were children then, and both were held in camps with their families.

At StoryCorps, 83-year-old Roy told Aiko about what happened in his hometown of Clovis, N.M., in the weeks just before the executive order was issued.

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Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

Municipalities across New York State are expected to be paying more in energy costs because of the state's nuclear subsidies. That is according to a report from the Alliance for a Green Economy, which opposes the nuclear subsidies. The report estimated the extra cost for six of the state's largest cities. The city of Syracuse is expected to pay an additional $1.4 million over the next 12 years. Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner said that number does not scare her.

Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

New York's attorney general is encouraging state residents to test their internet speeds and let his office know if they are not living up to the performance promised by their internet provider.

The suggestion by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman comes after his office filed suit earlier this month against Charter Communications and its subsidiary Spectrum, formerly known as Time Warner.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The Republican majority of the Onondaga County Legislature is coming out against Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan for government consolidation and the Consensus plan to merge the city of Syracuse and county governments. Some legislators said the governor and the Onondaga County executive are alone in their support for a merged government.

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