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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

Kramchang / Flickr

A wage board convened by Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to vote to raise the hourly minimum rate for fast food workers in New York state from the current $8.75 cents an hour to as high as $15 an hour when it meets on Wednesday.

The board was appointed by Cuomo when Republicans in the New York State Senate did not agree to raise the minimum wage any higher than the current phased-in increase, which will bring the minimum wage to $9 an hour by the end of this year.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

The numbers of synthetic marijuana cases called into the Upstate New York Poison Center continues to be off the charts. Officials say there could be more than 800 by the end of the year if the cases don’t abate.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News file photo

New York state’s comptroller finds that local and school property taxes will increase by the lowest percentage in decades, under the rules of the tax cap program recently renewed by the state legislature.

According to the law, property taxes are capped at 2 percent per year or the rate of inflation, whichever is less. The projected rate of inflation for the 2016 calendar year is less than 1 percent, at .73 percent, says Comptroller Tom DiNapoli.

Brazil hosted the World Cup last year. Next year, it will host the Summer Olympics. On Sunday, though, the country played host to another international gathering of talented competitors: the Rubik's Cube World Championship.

This past weekend, hundreds of "speedcubers," as they're known, descended on Sao Paulo from over 40 countries, to take part in three days of intensive competition.

Federal regulators are looking to place tighter controls on the export of cyberweapons following the megabreaches against the Office of Personnel Management and countless retailers.

The Commerce Department wants to ensure that software that can attack a network — the kind that can break in, bypass encryption and steal data — can't be shipped overseas without permission. But the cybersecurity industry is up in arms.

It's family vacation time, and I've taken the kids back to where I grew up — a small plot of land off a dirt road in Kansas.

For my city kids, this is supposed to be heaven. There are freshly laid chicken eggs to gather, new kittens to play with and miles of pasture to explore.

But we're not outside.

I'm sitting in my childhood bedroom watching my 7-year-old son and his 11-year-old-cousin stare at a screen. The older kid is teaching the younger the secrets of one of the most popular games on Earth: Minecraft.

How Should Republicans Deal With Donald Trump?

Jul 20, 2015
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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

David. Hey, David.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yeah?

MONTAGNE: What am I - what am I thinking?

GREENE: (Laughter) I have no idea. I'm not a mind reader.

You could see being upset if you came to a concert to hear a band — and they suddenly stopped playing.

That happened Saturday night at Wonder Bar on the Jersey shore.

Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers were just 20 minutes into their set when ... Bruce Springsteen crashed the show. He played for nearly two hours.

The Houserockers had no hard feelings.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Plantigrade Pastry Purloiner Persnickety

Jul 17, 2015

A Colorado bear recently had itself a heck of a breakfast: 24 pies.

The owners of the Colorado Cherry Company bakery between Lyons and Estes Park say they've experienced bear break-ins before, but this one was a little choosy.

Apparently during his early morning ransack, the bear went for apple and cherry pies — but left the strawberry rhubarb pies untouched.

When you have visitors you can't get rid, sometimes you just have to embrace them. That's the idea behind a festival on this week in the remote Siberian town of Berezniki, which is celebrating mosquitoes.

Revelers dress in mosquito costumes, vie to catch the most mosquitoes — and, perhaps oddest of all, hold a "most delicious girl" competition.

A panel of judges inspect contestants for who can get the most bites. The winner two years back had over 100.

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

Copyright 2015 Capital Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.capradio.org.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

On Thursday, President Obama became the first sitting president in U.S. history to visit a federal prison, taking a tour of the El Reno Federal Correction Institution in Oklahoma. Earlier in the week, he addressed the NAACP in Philadelphia, calling for reforms in the criminal justice system — with the hopes of helping people who have served time turn their lives around.

Oshea Israel, whom listeners first met through StoryCorps in 2011, has done just that.

As you know, here at The Salt we've been a little obsessed with yogurt lately.

But there's a flip side to the story of the yogurt boom. What about that other product made from fermented milk that had its boom from 1950 to 1975, and has been sliding into obscurity ever since?

Cottage cheese took off as a diet and health food in the 1950s.

Syria's civil war has created the worst refugee crisis in the world, with more than 4 million people fleeing the country. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, though we rarely hear from them.

Over the past year, NPR's Morning Edition has spoken three times with Saeed al-Batal, a photographer and filmmaker who doesn't use his real name for security reasons.

Seagulls don't get a lot of respect; they seem to be all screeching and scavenging for food. But at least one sea gull showed the guts of a hero recently.

Photographer David Canales caught what he called this "epic aerial battle" while kayaking in Alaska: A bald eagle, one seagull trapped in its talons, under ferocious assault from another gull.

Unfortunately, for all its fellow seagull's daring, the eagle's snack did not appear to escape.

It's happy hour in Illinois. Well, not right this instant, but many are happy that happy hour is back.

Alcoholic drink specials were banned in the state more than 25 years ago, but Gov. Bruce Rauner overturned that yesterday.

There are still some restrictions: So-called volume specials — like two-for-one, or all-you-can-drink — are not allowed.

Happy hour also has to end by 10 p.m. That's fine with your hard-working, overnight-hours Morning Edition staff, so long as happy hour can start at noon.

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo for the first time as governor, has an approval rating below 50 percent in a new Siena College poll that also finds only 39 percent of New Yorkers think he’s doing a good job in office.

Chamber of Marine Commerce

People along the St. Lawrence River love to watch and take photos of the huge freighters that move through the water every season.  If you’ve been wondering what the ships are carrying this year, the answer is tons of rocks. 

By rocks, we’re talking about literal boatloads of sand and stone that’ll be used as road fill to expand interstates in Wisconsin.

Ships are also on their way to Cleveland, Detroit, Milwaukee and Chicago carrying cement and steel for big construction booms there.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo reached a key milestone that he might not be happy about. Cuomo, for the first time as governor, has an approval rating below 50 percent in a new poll.

Siena College, which conducted the poll, found Cuomo's popularity to be at 49 percent. Siena pollster Steve Greenberg says 50 percent is considered a “magic number” in the political world, that politicians strive to stay above.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And for more now on the Iran nuclear deal, we're joined by Karim Sadjadpour, who's senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment.

Welcome.

KARIM SADJADPOUR: Great to be with you.

City of Syracuse

The president of Syracuse’s Police Benevolent Association is calling for more cops on the street, in the wake of a violent stretch in the city. Over the 4th of July weekend, 10 people were shot in a 24-hour span.

In a letter to the editor on Syracuse.com, PBA president Jeff Piedmonte suggests residents contact Mayor Stephanie Miner, urging her to hire 50 more police officers. Piedmonte says there are currently 417 police officers on the streets, the lowest number since the 1970s. He says that’s dangerously low, especially at a time of an uptick in crime.

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