Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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3:01am

Fri March 22, 2013
Movies

Not Doing So 'Boffo,' 'Daily Variety' Drops Print Edition

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Print versions of Daily Variety, like this one from 2003, will no longer be available on L.A. newsstands. Variety will continue online and in a print weekly, but the daily print edition is being dropped.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

For eight decades, Daily Variety has been a Hollywood must-read for everyone from studio heads to actors looking for a big break. But the days of assistants running out to grab the "trades" are over: This week, the Los Angeles institution published its last daily edition.

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3:00am

Fri March 22, 2013
Business

Google's Eric Schmidt Heads To Another Isolated Asian Nation

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman and former CEO, stands near a statue of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang in January. He's headed now to Myanmar, another largely untapped market.
David Guttenfelder AP

Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, who went to North Korea in January, is making a short visit Friday to Myanmar, also known as Burma.

Why is the senior executive of a U.S. technology powerhouse visiting some of the poorest and least wired countries in Asia?

Schmidt will be the first top U.S. executive to travel to the Southeast Asian nation since it began emerging from decades of international isolation under a military dictatorship.

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2:01am

Fri March 22, 2013
StoryCorps

Living And Loving Through The Bubonic Plague

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

John Tull, 63, and Lucinda Marker, 57, survived a bout of the bubonic plague in 2002.
StoryCorps

The bubonic plague killed about one-third of Europe's population during the Middle Ages, but today the bacterial infection rarely shows up in the U.S. Only a handful of people catch it each year.

But in 2002, Lucinda Marker and her husband, John Tull, were bitten by fleas infected with the plague near their home in New Mexico. They then took a trip to New York City.

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12:03am

Fri March 22, 2013
Movie Interviews

Tina Fey, Movie Star? Not Quite Yet, She Says

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Tina Fey stars as Princeton University admissions counselor Portia Nathan in the new comedy Admission. Fey says the movie's frankly manic depiction of the college application melee appealed to her.
David Lee Focus Features

Writer, actor and producer Tina Fey stars in a new movie out today called Admission, a film that's nominally about getting into college. Fey plays an admissions officer at Princeton University, one of those diligent bureaucrats who cull thousands of applications in search of a small cadre of brilliant young people who will be the freshman class.

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10:30am

Thu March 21, 2013
Business

Gillibrand pushes for national $10 minimum wage

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) is pushing for a $10.10 federal minimum wage.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

New York's junior senator is staging a fight to raise the federal minimum wage to more than $10 an hour.

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9:32am

Thu March 21, 2013
Energy

Will hydropower from Quebec supply New York City?

Power generation at Beauharnois
Credit Courtesy Hydro-Québec

In Québec, electricity is cheap. Hydro-Québec, a state-owned utility, has over 60 generating stations that use the province’s rivers to produce power. One of them is Beauharnois, southwest of Montreal on the St. Lawrence River.

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9:23am

Thu March 21, 2013
Around the Nation

TSA Finds Sword Hidden In Cane At Dulles Airport

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Guards at Dulles Airport outside Washington have a sense of humor. I once asked a guy at a checkpoint in the basement how he was doing, and he answered: Living that dream. Too bad we don't now what Dulles guards said when a woman put her cane in the scanner. There was a sword inside. It was a sword cane. The woman had no idea.

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9:23am

Thu March 21, 2013
Animals

Broadway Understudy Is Less Than 'Purrfect'

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Last night was opening night for the Broadway show "Breakfast at Tiffany's," but The New York Times reports it was also curtains for one of the actors. Montie Corelli was fired. He had been the main understudy for Vito Vincent in the role of a cat. The black-and-white feline apparently refused to follow stage directions. But hey, he's a cat. And likely the casting process to replace Monti was a lot like herding cats.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

9:04am

Thu March 21, 2013
Politics and Government

Budget accord reached; lawmakers still filling in details

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders agreed to a framework for a new state budget Wednesday evening, but say they are still working out many of the details.

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5:10am

Thu March 21, 2013
Politics

House, Senate Budget Plans Offer Different Future

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 1:36 pm

House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., holds a copy of his budget plan during a news conference last week. On Thursday, the Republican-controlled House narrowly passed the measure. The Senate is not expected to follow suit.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan's House GOP budget balances in a decade and re-shapes Medicare. That is, it would if the measure passed by the House on Thursday ever became law — which it won't.

Washington Sen. Patty Murray's Democratic budget raises almost $1 trillion in taxes by closing loopholes and adds $100 billion in new spending on infrastructure. But it won't become a reality, either.

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5:10am

Thu March 21, 2013
Pop Culture

Bracket Frenzy Isn't Just For Basketball

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's always interesting to see what's trending on Twitter. Last night, there were all sorts of tweeted opinions about President Obama's NCAA bracket, that he took the time to fill one out, what teams he picked.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Glad to see that he picked Indiana to win it all. Oh, the bracket drama. Now the thing about March Madness is that everyone is in on the bracket frenzy.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIO CLIPS)

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5:10am

Thu March 21, 2013
National Security

Pentagon May Take Over CIA's Drone Program

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

We're learning this morning of a possible change in the American use of unmanned drones. The change, if it happens, would affect who gives the orders and possibly how much the public learns.

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9:43am

Wed March 20, 2013
Regional Coverage

Fracking Rule Delays Rile New Yorkers

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Horizontal hydro-fracking has transformed the energy market. Drillers get natural gas out of the ground by drilling down, then sideways, using water pressure to unlock energy - natural gas. But for all the money coming out of the ground in some places, the technique is contentious and New York does not allow it; which causes landowners to feel they're being left behind.

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8:31am

Wed March 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Arizona State's Sun Devil To Get Another Makeover

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with an update on Sparky, the Arizona State Sun Devil. The university mascot is a devil with a pitchfork and horns. He got a makeover with help from Disney. But as we've reported, this effort to make a friendlier, more accessible devil created a monster. Many students hate the new Sparky with an almost religious fervor, so the university has surrendered. Authorities will re-redesign the devil costume and let alumni and others vote on the design.

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8:25am

Wed March 20, 2013
Around the Nation

$3 Flee Market Find Proves Valuable

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 7:03 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

We hear, occasionally, about a flea market find that turns out to be a valuable work of art. This morning the tale of a tiny Chinese bowl, pretty and looking like an open blossom. It was bought for $3 at a tag sale in New York. The bowl sat for several years on a mantel before the owner wondered where it came from, turns out the Song Dynasty a thousand years ago. Yesterday, the bowl sold at auction for $2.25 million.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:51am

Wed March 20, 2013
Energy

New York's coal-fired power plants: repower or take offline?

NRG's power plant in Dunkirk, N.Y. is one of many coal-fired plants facing an uncertain future.
Kate O'Connell Innovation Trail

It's a tough environment for coal-plants in New York state. The state is home to some of the oldest power facilities in the country, which operate under stricter emissions regulations introduced by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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7:35am

Wed March 20, 2013
Politics and Government

Lawmakers say weekend budget session increasingly likely

The New York state budget is crawling to a conclusion, as legislative leaders and Gov. Andrew Cuomo continue closed door meetings to try to strike a final deal.

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6:54am

Wed March 20, 2013
NPR Story

Obama Begins Middle East Trip

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. President Obama is making his first visit to Israel since he's been in the White House. His past relations with Israel's government have not always gone well. Though the two nations insist they're reached new levels of security cooperation, they have publicly debated issues ranging from Iran to the Mideast peace process.

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6:54am

Wed March 20, 2013
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Twinkies, Ho Hos and Ding Dongs will go to a pair of private equity firms. Wonder Bread will be sold to snack food maker Flowers Food. The Beefsteak brand of bread will go to a Mexican company.

6:54am

Wed March 20, 2013
NPR Story

Dramatic Testimony Marks Start Of Guatemalan Genocide Trial

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's hear now about a dramatic trial in Guatemala. That country's former dictator is charged with genocide and crimes against humanity, stemming from the killings that happened in the early 1980s. Seventeen hundred indigenous Guatemalans - the Ixils people - died during one of the bloodiest periods of the country's three-decade-long war, a war that ultimately claimed more than 200,000 lives. At the time the U.S.-backed strongman, Ephraim Rios Montt, ruled the country.

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3:22am

Wed March 20, 2013
Regional Coverage

A new plan to bring back the Hotel Syracuse

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) speaks in front of the Hotel Syracuse.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Sen. Charles Schumer is bringing his influence to the latest plan to revive the Hotel Syracuse.  The Democrat senator believes a federal tax credit program would help draw investors that would be willing to spend the millions it would take to restore the Warren Street historic landmark.

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3:18am

Wed March 20, 2013
Sports

Good Luck With That 'Perfect' March Madness Bracket. You'll Need It

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Kansas center Jeff Withey (left) and Kentucky guard Darius Miller battle under the boards during the second half of the NCAA championship on April 2, 2012.
Mark Humphrey AP

Basketball fans have one more day to fill out their March Madness brackets. They'll need to predict not just the champions and their route to victory, but also the paths of all the losers. It's not easy. In fact, no person or computer has yet been able to do it.

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3:16am

Wed March 20, 2013
Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship

How To Be The Good Guy With A Gun At School

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Stockton Unified School District Police Officer Myra Franco and Chief Jim West patrol 50 schools in California's Central Valley region. One of the campuses was the site of a 1989 shooting massacre.
Richard Gonzales NPR

Ever since the Newtown, Ct., school shooting, there's been a raging debate over how to keep America's schoolchildren safe. National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre proposed stationing an armed guard in every school in the country. Critics said that idea was impractical and would be too expensive to carry out.

But many schools and school districts already have armed police officers. Since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999, about one-third of the schools in the U.S. have added some kind of armed security, according to federal data.

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3:09am

Wed March 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

Law Says Insurers Should Pay For Breast Pumps, But Which Ones?

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Some insurers prefer to pay for manual breast pumps, but some working moms prefer more expensive, electric models.
iStockphoto.com

Pediatricians and health officials are eager to encourage breast-feeding as one of the best and most economical ways to protect a baby's health.

To that end, the federal Affordable Care Act requires that health insurance plans provide new mothers with equipment and services to help make those feedings easier.

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10:03pm

Tue March 19, 2013
Sweetness And Light

What's The Score On Spirited Sports Banter At Bars?

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

iStockphoto.com

The more I travel, the more I see sports bars. They've been around for years, usually in obvious places, like in college towns or near arenas.

But now they're everywhere, even in airports and hotels, places where you'd expect generic bars. Sports bars are becoming ubiquitous and ordinary — merely, as my wife calls them, public man caves.

All bars, of course, have forever been places where men talk about sports. Other prime saloon subjects include women, the traffic and the weather.

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9:38am

Tue March 19, 2013
Europe

Cyprus Proposes Exempting Smaller Deposits From Tax

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawmakers in Cyprus are trying to ease rage over a proposed tax on all bank deposits by exempting people who have relatively small accounts. It's part of a bailout plan for that Mediterranean country negotiated with the E.U. and IMF over the weekend, but the compromise on taxes may not be enough for Cyprus' parliament to pass the plan.

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9:28am

Tue March 19, 2013
Environment

New York's forests in need of healthier regeneration

Deer on the Stackhouse property is a very common sight
Sidsel Overgaard/WRVO

Imagine a New York autumn with almost no red or orange -- just brown, brown, brown. Experts say that could be the scene 50 years from now if people don’t start paying more attention to what’s going on with the shrubs, bushes and saplings in the forest. 

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9:12am

Tue March 19, 2013
Politics and Government

State budget talks to go another day

New York state lawmakers are close to agreeing on a new spending plan that would include a deal to raise taxes on the wealthy and raise the minimum wage.  They failed to seal a pact Monday night, but say they will be back Tuesday morning to try again.

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8:35am

Tue March 19, 2013
Energy

$1 billion "green bank" would invest in clean tech projects

An energy-efficient heating and cooling system being tested at the Syracuse Center of Excellence.
Syracuse Center of Excellence

More energy-efficient technologies, from water heaters to wind turbine, have been coming onto the marketplace for decades.

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7:52am

Tue March 19, 2013
Around the Nation

A Guilty Conscience Needs No Accuser

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A guilty conscience needs no accuser. The Barry County Sheriff's Department in Michigan received $1,200 in cash yesterday with an emotional letter. The writer admitted stealing $800 from a convenience store some 30 years ago; writing, quote, "I can't begin to say how sorry I am, but have lived with this guilt too long."

A noble gesture but keeping up with inflation, the robber would technically owe another $600.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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