Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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3:26am

Thu January 3, 2013
Around the Nation

Hurricane Sandy Brings One Family Closer

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 8:26 am

The day after their neighborhood was flooded, the Hardys returned to their house to start bagging up the garbage. The contents of the fridge were spread all over the kitchen floor and even outside. There were sausages in the street. The kitchen floor was a mess of muddy puddles.
Courtesy of Heather Hardy

The Hardy family goes back generations in a tiny neighborhood called Gerritsen Beach at the southern end of Brooklyn. For them, Superstorm Sandy has created something like an extended family reunion.

Their 2 1/2 bedroom house is currently just barely livable. They removed a fallen tree, replaced drywall, fixed the electricity and heat, and threw down rugs to keep the dust and mold from overwhelming them until they do the work the house really needs.

The Hardy family is more closely knit than a lot of people could stand.

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3:24am

Thu January 3, 2013
Television

'Downton Abbey' Cast: It's More Fun Downstairs

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:41 pm

Hugh Bonneville (left) stars as Lord Grantham and Jim Carter as Mr. Carson, the formidable butler of Downton Abbey.
Joss Barratt Carnival Films

With the third season of the sumptuously upholstered period drama Downton Abbey coming to PBS Masterpiece Classic on Jan. 6, Morning Edition's David Greene sat down with a half-dozen members of the cast to talk about what's in store.

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12:55am

Thu January 3, 2013
The Record

Patti Page, Who Dominated The '50s Pop Charts, Dies

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 6:27 am

Patti Page, whose comforting voice made hits of heartbreaking ballads ("Tennessee Waltz") and novelty songs ("How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?"), died Tuesday in Encinitas, Calif. She was 85 years old.

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6:23pm

Wed January 2, 2013
It's All Politics

Democratic Leader Pelosi to GOP Colleagues: 'Take Back Your Party'

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 9:00 am

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks at a Dec. 19 news conference on Capitol Hill.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says she has urged Republican colleagues in Congress to "take back your party" from "anti-government ideologues" in their ranks.

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10:35am

Wed January 2, 2013
Television

Who's Gay On TV? Dads, Journalists, Investigators And Footmen

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 8:24 pm

Partners Bryan (Andrew Rannells) and David (Justin Bartha) decide to use a surrogate to expand their family in The New Normal.
Trae Patton AP

The pop culture gay flavor of the minute? White gay dads.

"We're having a baby, Bri!" croons one of the leads on NBC's The New Normal. "This is our family. You, me and that kid forever."

It's a mini-boomlet, says real-life white gay dad and sociology professor Joshua Gamson. Not too long ago, he says, pop culture mainly defined gay men as promiscuous and deviant, rather than monogamous and devoted to their families.

"It does seem like a strong counter-stereotype of how gay men have been portrayed over the past, whatever, 50 years," he says.

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9:21am

Wed January 2, 2013
The Upstate Economy

North Country housing market tight as Fort Drum deployments smaller, shorter

Nearly all of Fort Drum's soldiers are at the post right now, not on deployments – and that's a first for the region since the installation's expansion in 2001. That has tightened the region's housing market, for soldiers, who have fewer choices, and for civilians, who don't receive housing assistance like soldiers do and are looking for affordable housing.  

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9:11am

Wed January 2, 2013
Environment

Last year's Christmas tree is this spring's mulch

Onondaga County will be collecting Christmas trees to be turned into mulch.
lizard10979 via Flickr

If you're putting away Christmas decorations and taking ornaments off the tree, Onondaga County's recycling agency wants to make sure that old tree gets re-purposed.

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7:30am

Wed January 2, 2013
Around the Nation

Staten Island To Get Largest Ferris Wheel

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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7:27am

Wed January 2, 2013
Animals

Bird Sighting Record Broken In Canada

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:09am

Wed January 2, 2013
NPR Story

Bowl Guys Aim To Attend Every Bowl Game

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, as Frank pointed out, a lot of illegal sports betting is spurred by college basketball. But college football also keeps plenty of bookies in business, especially these past few weeks with all these bowl games.

(SOUNDBITE OF ESPN BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ohio, Louisiana-Monroe Advocare V-100 Independence Bowl, Rutgers-Virginia Technology, Russell Athletics Bowl, Minnesota-Texas Tech, Mineke Car Bowl of Texas...

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:09am

Wed January 2, 2013
NPR Story

What Was Left Out Of 'Fiscal Cliff' Compromise?

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's talk about everything that was left out of the fiscal cliff compromise approved by Congress yesterday. The measure does raise taxes for the wealthy and preserve tax cuts for others, and extend unemployment insurance again, among other things. But it left a huge amount of fighting for the New Year.

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4:35am

Wed January 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Research: A Little Extra Fat May Help You Live Longer

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 9:09 am

An analysis of many studies finds a small spare tire may be associated with longer life. But skeptics say that conclusion is rubbish.
iStockphoto.com

Being a little overweight may tip the odds in favor of living a long life, according to a new analysis. Researchers say there may be some benefit to having a little extra body fat.

This isn't the first time researchers have raised questions about the link between body weight and how long someone will live. While there's no debate that being severely obese will raise the risk of all kinds of illnesses and even cut some lives short, it's less clear what happens to people who are less overweight.

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3:49am

Wed January 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Pete Stark, Health Policy Warrior, Leaves A Long Legacy

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:25 am

Rep. Pete Stark, a California Democrat, was defeated in November. Stark leaves a long-lasting mark on the nation's health care system.
Jeff Chiu AP

The 113th Congress will be the first one in 40 years to convene without California Rep. Pete Stark as a member.

Stark was defeated in November by a fellow Democrat under new California voting rules. Stark may not be a household name, but he leaves a long-lasting mark on the nation's health care system.

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3:49am

Wed January 2, 2013
World

Pakistan's 'Patriot Act' Could Target Politicians

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

A policeman stands guard at the Parliament building in Islamabad, Pakistan, in June. The Lower House recently passed a bill similar to the United States' Patriot Act, touching off a debate about privacy in the country.
Ahmad Kamal Xinhua/Landov

Earlier this month, Pakistan's powerful Lower House of Parliament passed what analysts have dubbed Pakistan's Patriot Act. Its name here is "Investigation for Fair Trial Bill."

It has been presented to the Pakistani people as a way to update existing law and usher the rules for investigation in Pakistan into the 21st century. Among other things, it makes electronic eavesdropping admissible as evidence in court.

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3:48am

Wed January 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Mosquito Maven Takes Bites For Malaria Research

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:47 am

Chiara Andolina, a malaria researcher in Thailand, feeds her mosquito colony by letting the insects bite her right arm. These mosquitoes are picky and will dine only on live human blood.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Most of us do everything possible to avoid mosquitoes. But one Italian researcher literally sacrifices her right arm to keep the lowly insects alive.

Chiara Adolina is studying a new malaria drug, and she needs the little suckers for her experiments. So she feeds them each day with her own blood.

She extends her arm into a mosquito cage to give the insects "breakfast." Several dozen mosquitoes spread across her forearm and jam their proboscises into her skin. "Can you see how fat they become?" she says. "Look at that tummy."

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1:48am

Wed January 2, 2013
Sweetness And Light

New Jersey Tries To Horn In On Nevada's Gambling Turf

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:16 am

iStockphoto.com

For those dearly devoted of you who paid attention to me in September, I noted that the best bet in the NFL had proven to be whenever a West Coast team played an East Coast team at night, because the Pacific players had their body clocks better set.

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9:45am

Tue January 1, 2013
Politics

'Fiscal Cliff' Measure Heads To The House

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 12:39 pm

A compromise deal to stop broad spending cuts and tax increases is headed to the House of Representatives, after receiving strong support in the Senate. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., talks with Steve Inskeep about a possible House vote on the "fiscal cliff" deal.

Cole, the House deputy majority whip who also serves on the Appropriations Committee, says he expects the House to approve the Senate bill, calling it "a pretty big win."

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7:00am

Tue January 1, 2013
Arts

What's Landmark Theatre's economic impact on Syracuse

The Landmark Theatre opened in 1928, with seating for just under 3,000 people, as a silent movie theater. It was first known at Loew's State's Theatre.
Landmark Theatre

Most major centers for the arts, like an old theater downtown, usually don't turn a profit. They're not really expected to. But last month at a forum at downtown Syracuse's Landmark Theatre, the argument was made that grandiose theaters shouldn't be viewed as charities.

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6:50am

Tue January 1, 2013
Health Care

Hobby Lobby Plans To Defy Health Care Mandate

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This New Year could mean a new cost for the craft store chain Hobby Lobby. The federal health care law requires employee insurance plans to cover emergency contraceptives. Hobby Lobby's owners did not want to do that. They say drugs commonly known by names like the morning-after pill are tantamount to abortion.

Now, the Supreme Court has turned aside Hobby Lobby's request to block the mandate. So, starting today, the company could be fined as much as $1.3 million per day for defying the law.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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6:50am

Tue January 1, 2013
Around the Nation

School Wants 'Bucket List' To Kick The Bucket

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Michigan's Lake Superior State University issued its annual list of annoying expressions to banish. The list includes: trending, bucket list, kick the can down the road and spoiler alert. The top one to ban: fiscal cliff.

6:33am

Tue January 1, 2013
Around the Nation

Mayor Settles Council Election Tie With Coin Toss

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Democracy sure works in mysterious ways. In Seguin, Texas, a December city council election ended in a dead tie. Both candidates received 141 votes. So it was up to the mayor to settle things. The law gave him some options: drawing straws or tossing dice. He chose an old coin toss. The silver dollar landed, it was tails, and immediately Jeannette Crabb was sworn into a four-year term. She's coming to office with quite a mandate.

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6:32am

Tue January 1, 2013
Environment

Reintroducing Atlantic salmon to the Salmon River

Fishers on the Salmon River
David Chanatry/New York State Reporting Project

In recent years both the federal and New York state governments have been studying how best to re-introduce – salmon -- to New York’s Salmon River.  That might come as a surprise to anyone who’s ever fished the river, known for its salmon of eye-popping size. 

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6:05am

Tue January 1, 2013
Technology

New technologies can help seniors "age in place"

AgeLab agelab.mit.edu

As the number of seniors citizens in America grows each year, the issue of how to make life easier for older people is growing in importance as well. One researcher, Joe Coughlin, has made it his passion to use technology to help people live longer and live better. WRVO's Catherine Loper spoke with Coughlin, who has roots in upstate New York, when he was in Syracuse this fall.

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4:59am

Tue January 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 10:08 am

Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012.
Heather Charles MCT/Landov

The past year has seen more debate about the best way to find breast cancers.

A recent analysis concluded that regular mammograms haven't reduced the rate of advanced breast cancers — but they have led more than a million women to be diagnosed with tumors that didn't need to be treated.

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4:59am

Tue January 1, 2013
Business

What Does Senate Budget Deal Mean For You?

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year.

Let's start with the upside. Congress has yet to rattle the financial markets so far in 2013.

GREENE: Of course, the markets are closed on this New Year's Day, as the House considers a deal on taxes and spending. The Senate has already approved that plan by a huge majority.

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4:59am

Tue January 1, 2013
Latin America

Mexico's President Alters Tactics Against Drug Crimes

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It has been a busy year in Mexico's war on drugs. The administration of former President Felipe Calderon struck major blows to the country's largest cartels, slowing the violence that has claimed more than 50,000 lives.

But the new president, Enrique Pena Nieto, says he'll change tactics. He wants to go after the crime associated with drug trafficking instead of taking down crime bosses. His new attorney general says this is the right strategy, since the number of crime gangs working in the country has grown significantly.

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3:04am

Tue January 1, 2013
Southword

Coming Home — And Out — In The South

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:17 pm

Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, based in Washington, D.C.
Dave Anderson Oxford American magazine

Many years ago, a young Chad Griffin left his hometown of Arkadelphia, Ark., to pursue a career in politics. Today, he's the newest head of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) — a powerful gay rights group based in Washington, D.C.

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3:00am

Tue January 1, 2013
Science

The Year Of The Higgs, And Other Tiny Advances In Science

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of the Higgs boson on July 4, the long-sought building block of the universe. This image shows a computer-simulation of data from the collider.
Barcroft Media/Landov

It's a year-end tradition to cobble together a list of the most important advances in science. But, truth be told, many ideas that change the world don't tend to spring from these flashy moments of discovery. Our view of nature — and our technology — often evolve from a sequence of more subtle advances.

Even so, chances are good that this year's list-makers will choose the discovery of the Higgs boson as the most important discovery of 2012.

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3:00am

Tue January 1, 2013
Law

Justice Wants Banks To Be Quasi Cops

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

Assistant U.S. Attorney General Lanny Breuer announces a nearly $2 billion money laundering settlement with British bank HSBC on Dec. 11 in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Every year, banks handle tens of millions of transactions. Some of them involve drug money, or deals with companies doing secret business with countries like Iran and Syria, in defiance of trade sanctions.

But if the Justice Department has its way, banks will be forced to change — to spot illegal transactions and blow the whistle before any money changes hands.

Federal prosecutors have already collected more than $4.5 billion from some of the world's biggest financial institutions — banks charged with looking the other way when dirty money passed through their accounts.

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2:49am

Tue January 1, 2013
Deceptive Cadence

Was 2012 The Year That American Orchestras Hit The Wall?

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

In Minneapolis, the locked-out musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra are appealing for public support.
Courtesy of the Musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra

2012 will go down as a year of orchestral turmoil in the U.S.: Strikes, lockouts and bankruptcies erupted time and again as once seemingly untouchable institutions struggled financially.

There's been particularly little seasonal cheer in Minnesota's orchestral community. Protests erupted after management at the Minnesota Orchestra and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra each locked out their musicians, after the musicians had rejected contracts that cut their salaries by tens of thousands of dollars and reduced the size of the orchestras.

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