Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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5:39am

Tue December 4, 2012
Regional Coverage

North side hookah lounge will not be allowed to reopen

A hookah lounge on Syracuse's north side will not be reopening for a second time. The Common Council has rejected a permit for the business to do so.

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4:11am

Tue December 4, 2012
Around the Nation

Manhattan Project Sites Part Of Proposed Park

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 6:55 am

The mushroom cloud of the first atomic explosion at Trinity test site in the southern New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945.
AP

Congress is considering whether to turn three top-secret sites involved with creating the atomic bomb into one of the country's most unusual national parks.

The Manhattan Project — the U.S. program to design and build the first atomic bomb during World War II — largely took place at three sites: Los Alamos, N.M.; Oak Ridge, Tenn.; and Hanford, Wash. On July 16, 1945, the first test of an atomic bomb took place at a site in the southern New Mexico desert. Hiroshima and then Nagasaki, Japan, were bombed less than a month after the test.

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4:07am

Tue December 4, 2012
Your Money

What's Next For The Daily Deal Business Model?

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 8:22 am

Despite their recent woes, "daily deal" companies Groupon and Living Social can be profitable, says analyst Arvind Bhatia.
NPR

Are the days of "daily deal" coupons about to expire? Shares of email coupon company Groupon are down nearly 80 percent since going public last year. And its smaller rival, Living Social, plans to lay off as many as 400 employees, after reporting a net loss of more than $560 million in the third quarter.

Those struggles have raised questions about the future of the daily deal strategy, and whether a company like Groupon can stay in business.

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3:50am

Tue December 4, 2012
Shots - Health News

The (Huge And Rarely Discussed) Health Insurance Tax Break

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 9:56 am

The largest tax break in the federal code doesn't appear on the forms the average person fills out each year.
iStockphoto.com

What's the largest tax break in the federal tax code?

If you said the mortgage interest deduction, you'd be wrong. The break for charitable giving? Nope. How about capital gains, or state and local taxes? No, and no.

Believe it or not, dollar for dollar, the most tax revenue the federal government forgoes every year is from not taxing the value of health insurance that employers provide their workers.

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3:39am

Tue December 4, 2012
Europe

Cat Fight In Rome: Beloved Shelter Faces Closure

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 10:23 am

A stray cat rests at the Torre Argentina ruins in Rome in October. Officials say a cat shelter that sits adjacent to the site must be shut down.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Anyone who has visited Rome and its antique monuments has also seen their four-legged residents: the many stray cats that bask in the sun amid the ruins.

One site in central Rome is known as "cat forum," thanks to its adjacent cat shelter. But Italian archaeology officials have issued the Torre Argentina Cat Shelter Association an eviction notice, and feline lovers from around the world are bracing for a cat fight.

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3:33am

Tue December 4, 2012
Middle East

A Rebel Fighter Sees Islamic Law In Syria's Future

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 8:18 pm

A Syrian rebel walks past the stairs of a bombed building in the Saif Al Duli district in Aleppo, Syria, on Sept. 10. The vast majority of those fighting against President Bashar Assad's regime are ordinary Syrians and soldiers who have defected, but Islamist rebels are also present among the fighters.
AP

It's about 9 o'clock in the morning, and already it's been a long day for Abu Anas. He has lost two men to a sniper serving the Syrian regime. Four more have been injured.

But Abu Anas walks with a striking calm through the bombed-out, ruined streets of Aleppo, a city that has been at war for months. He wears a black headband bearing Islam's holy creed: "There is no God but God. And Muhammad is his messenger."

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3:27am

Tue December 4, 2012
The Record

A $100 Guitar Makes A 30,000-Mile Odyssey

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 8:20 pm

The $100 guitar proves once again that it's not just the instrument, it's what you do with it.
Courtesy of The $100 Guitar Project

2:03am

Tue December 4, 2012
Music News

3 Strings And A Snakeskin: Okinawa's Native Instrument

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 9:37 am

In subtropical Japan, the sanshin is a ubiquitous part of life.
Collection of Museo Azzarini, Universidad Nacional de La Plata Wikimedia Commons

10:36pm

Mon December 3, 2012
Regional Coverage

New commanding general takes helm at Fort Drum

Major General Stephen Townsend has taken over as commanding general of Fort Drum and the 10th Mountain Division.

Major General Stephen Townsend has taken over command of Fort Drum and the 10th Mountain Division following a ceremony at the post yesterday morning.  

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4:07pm

Mon December 3, 2012
Monkey See

PBS Remixes 'Reading Rainbow,' Delights Map And Book Nerds Everywhere

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 4:48 pm

LeVar Burton and 7 year old Shane Ammon exploring the all Reading Rainbow adventure app at the "Reading Rainbow Relaunch" event in June.
AP

9:03am

Mon December 3, 2012
Startups

60 seconds on the clock, a pitch for co-founders

Participants pitch their ideas for startups with the hope of gaining teammates at Startup Weekend.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Microphone in hand, hopeful entrepreneurs began their pitches: a way to track when the next bus is coming, a more portable sailboat, a social network for food lovers.

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9:00am

Mon December 3, 2012
Politics and Government

Should Thruway Authority merge with transportation department?

The leader of the New York state Assembly Republicans is proposing to do away with the state’s Thruway Authority and merge it into the state Department of Transportation, in an attempt to avoid excessive toll hikes.

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8:54am

Mon December 3, 2012
Politics and Government

DEC: no fracking decision before health review is done

The Cuomo Administration says it will not be ruling on whether to allow hydrofracking in New York until an on-going health review is finished.  The delays have resulted in the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation having to open another public comment period, which begins December 12.

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7:31am

Mon December 3, 2012
Animals

Russian School Kids Entertain Lion Cub

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. An elementary school pet is typically an animal that can be kept in a terrarium or a small cage, like say a hamster. For a few hours, some Russian village kids cared for a far wilder creature - a lion cub they found in a field after it escaped from the trunk of a car. Waiting for police to come and take it to a local zoo, the kids played with it in the gym. The cub reportedly swiped the air but did not bite. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:18am

Mon December 3, 2012
Around the Nation

Virginia Man Bowls Perfect Game

With a modified wheelchair and a $20 bowling ball from a yard sale, a Virginia man rolled a perfect game last week. George Holscher had 12 strikes in a row, according to The Virginian-Pilot. Holscher is the second wheelchair bowler on record to rack up 300 points.

4:57am

Mon December 3, 2012
Middle East

Israeli Settlement Plan

Originally published on Thu December 20, 2012 3:19 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

For years the United States has urged the Israelis and Palestinians to negotiate a peace accord based on a two-state solution. Well, there are growing concerns within the international community that the chances of that ever happening are dimming.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Palestinians angered Israel last week by securing a symbolically important vote at the United Nations General Assembly, upgrading their status from a non-member entity to a non-member state. Israel responded with reprisals.

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4:57am

Mon December 3, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 7:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, the subject of our last word in business today may not change the world, but it is kind of snazzy. It is called the Air Umbrella. Now, picture an umbrella handle and nothing else, sort of like a wand.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Yeah. We are entering a magic world, here. That wand apparently keeps you dry by releasing a shield of air. The tech website Mashable says it's still a design concept, but in theory, you could adjust the power and size of your invisible air shield depending on how heavily it's raining.

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4:57am

Mon December 3, 2012
Middle East

Egypt's Draft Constitution Divides Nation

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 5:12 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, who took power last June, is facing a rebellion against his rule. It all started with a set of controversial decrees by the president that put him above the law until a constitution is in place. That move has polarized the country. Judges are on strike and critics say the president is pushing through an illegitimate constitution.

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3:26am

Mon December 3, 2012
It's All Politics

Pick A Number: Let's Play 'Cap Those Deductions'

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 8:35 am

In the presidential debate on Oct. 16, Mitt Romney presented a hypothetical way to cap deductions and raise revenue.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner says it's up to congressional Republicans to take the next step in budget talks to avoid the pending automatic spending cuts and tax increases at the end of the year.

Appearing on the Sunday talk shows, Geithner said there's "no path to an agreement" until Republicans are willing to accept higher tax rates on the rich.

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3:24am

Mon December 3, 2012
All Tech Considered

In Eye Control, A Promise To Let Your Tablet Go Hands-Free

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 4:57 am

In an image from an Eye Tribe video, a man uses his eyes to play the Fruit Ninja game, slicing fruit in half as it appears on the screen.
The Eye Tribe

Forget touch screens and voice recognition — what if you could control your computer just by looking at it? Gaze-based interaction has been around for 20 years, used mainly by people with disabilities. But the technology could be available to the masses soon, allowing users to move a cursor with their eyes, or turn the pages of an e-book without lifting a finger.

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3:23am

Mon December 3, 2012
Monkey See

Neil deGrasse Tyson Helps His New 'Bud' Superman Get A Glimpse Of Home

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 8:29 am

From Action Comics 14, Neil deGrasse Tyson greets Superman to help him with a problem.
DC Comics

On Monday's Morning Edition, Hayden Planetarium director and pop-culture go-to science guy Neil deGrasse Tyson tells NPR's David Greene the story of how he came to lend a hand to Superman.

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3:20am

Mon December 3, 2012
Books

No Rules In The Great 'Game' Of Afghan Politics

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 4:57 am

Courtesy of PublicAffairs

The story of Afghanistan — its history, its culture — is a narrative writer Tamim Ansary says he "carries in his bones." Ansary was born there to an Afghan father, educated in the United States, and an American mother.

He spent much of his 1950s childhood in the town of Lashkar Gah. There, his father worked on a massive irrigation project, funded by the U.S. and aimed at turning a dusty valley into fertile farms.

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3:19am

Mon December 3, 2012
Shots - Health News

Social Media Help Diabetes Patients (And Drugmakers) Connect

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 9:20 am

Cameron Harris, who has had Type 1 diabetes since he was 8 years old, explains the ins and outs of using glucagon for blood sugar lows. Harris hosts a video podcast series called "In Range" on YouTube.
Harwood Podcast Network YouTube

When Kerri Sparling was 7 years old, she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Her family didn't know anyone with the disease, so they sent her to diabetes camp — "where every single camper had Type 1 diabetes," she says.

"That was my first sense of not only other people who had diabetes, but a true community," says Sparling.

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5:58am

Sun December 2, 2012
All Tech Considered

The Sight Of Road Kill Makes A Pretty, Data-Rich Picture

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 4:26 pm

When wildlife ecologist Danielle Garneau finds roadkill, she uploads data about it onto her smartphone.
Sarah Harris NCPR

Wildlife ecologist Danielle Garneau is making a habit of tracking down roadkill. She actually seeks it out, hunting for clues about larger ecological trends. Garneau records it all on a free smartphone app, EpiCollect.

Standing by the side of the road in upstate New York, phone in hand, Garneau peers down at a dead, bloody and smelly skunk.

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8:00am

Sat December 1, 2012
Energy

Expiring tax credits for renewables blow an ill wind

70 new turbines dot the horizon in Clinton, NY.
Sarah Harris NCPR

Over the last decade, new wind farms have changed America’s landscapes – and its power sources. The growth has been spurred by a production tax credit wind companies get in exchange for producing energy. But the credit is due to expire at the end of the year if Congress doesn’t renew it.

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9:13am

Fri November 30, 2012
Politics and Government

Activists protest Valesky office, asking him to stick with Democrats

Activists outside state Sen. Dave Valesky's office
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

While the balance of the New York State senate remains unclear, as votes continue to be counted in a pair of close Senate races, activists are calling on a breakaway political coalition to stick with the Democrats. A coalition of union and community groups believe some important issues depend on it.

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8:59am

Fri November 30, 2012
The Upstate Economy

Plastic maker breaks ground on expansion in Auburn

Economic development officials and company workers held a groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion of Currier Plastics in Auburn.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

The walls on the 55,000 square foot expansion started going up a few weeks ago, but company owners and state and local economic development officials still gathered Thursday at Currier Plastics in Auburn to throw some dirt around with gleaming shovels.

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7:05am

Fri November 30, 2012
Strange News

Toilet-Paper Thief Returns 80 Rolls To University

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The holidays bring out the spirit of giving and giving back what you've pilfered. Recently, we told you about a 1930s teapot returned to the Waldorf Astoria. This morning: a tale of toilet paper. Eastern New Mexico University received a gift box filled with 80 rolls of toilet paper and a Christmas card apologizing for stealing rolls from a dorm years ago. Another inspiring holiday moment, or another TP prank? It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:05am

Fri November 30, 2012
Digital Life

Woman Turns To Facebook To Help Find Beloved Hat

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
NPR Story

Idaho's Rep. Labrador On Immigration Jobs Bill

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 8:06 am

Renee Montagne talks with Rep. Raul Labrador, Republican from Idaho and one of the congressmen who introduced the bill that's set for a vote Friday. The STEM Jobs Act allows people who are in the U.S. legally who are getting advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and math to stay and get their green cards, he says.

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