Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

Local Host(s): 
Jason Smith
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dfe1c8bbad399ea0c2|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Pages

3:52am

Mon October 1, 2012
Movies

The Best James Bond: Who's No. 1 As 007?

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:42 am

Daniel Craig plays James Bond in Skyfall, the 23rd film in the Bond franchise. Cast your vote this week on which actor was the best at being Bond.
Sony Pictures/Photofest

The role of James Bond has been played by six different actors in the Bond film franchise that started in 1962. Each actor brought his own strengths to the rakish British spy, from brooding physicality (Sean Connery, Daniel Craig) to smooth charm (Roger Moore, Pierce Brosnan).

For every actor who has portrayed Bond, there are fans who think he defined the character, and that the others merely toiled in his shadow. Craig will try to solidify his place in the Bond pantheon next month when the franchise releases its 23rd film, Skyfall.

Read more

3:32am

Mon October 1, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Nail Biting: Mental Disorder Or Just A Bad Habit?

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 9:54 am

Pathological nail biting may be a form of grooming on steroids, but it also makes the biter feel good, unlike fear-driven OCD.
Andrea Kissack for KQED

Do you bite your nails? For 30 years, I did. We nail biters can be "pathological groomers" — people for whom normal grooming behaviors, like skin picking or hair pulling, have become virtually uncontrollable.

Read more

3:31am

Mon October 1, 2012
Fiscal Cliff Notes

For High Earners, Expiring Tax Cuts Would Hit Hard

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 5:22 pm

This story is part of our occasional series Fiscal Cliff Notes.

If the Bush-era tax cuts are allowed to expire, the majority of Americans will see their taxes rise. Those who will see the largest increase are the wealthy.

Dr. Hamilton Lempert, an emergency room doctor in Cincinnati, works almost exclusively on overnight shifts.

Read more

3:30am

Mon October 1, 2012
Race

Integrating Ole Miss: A Transformative, Deadly Riot

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:07 pm

Meredith, center with briefcase, is escorted to the University of Mississippi campus by U.S. marshals on Oct. 1, 1962.
AP

Fifty years ago — Oct. 1, 1962 — the first black student was admitted to the University of Mississippi, a bastion of the Old South.

The town of Oxford erupted. It took some 30,000 U.S. troops, federal marshals and national guardsmen to get James Meredith to class after a violent campus uprising. Two people were killed and more than 300 injured. Some historians say the integration of Ole Miss was the last battle of the Civil War.

It was a high-stakes showdown between President Kennedy and Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett.

Read more

12:39am

Mon October 1, 2012
The Record

The CD, At 30, Is Feeling Its Age

Originally published on Wed October 17, 2012 1:01 pm

Today marks the 30th anniversary of a musical format many of us grew up with: the compact disc. It's been three decades since the first CD went on sale in Japan. The shiny discs came to dominate music industry sales, but their popularity has faded in the digital age they helped unleash. The CD is just the latest musical format to rise and fall in roughly the same 30-year cycle.

Compact discs had been pressed before 1982, but the first CD to officially go on sale was Billy Joel's 52nd Street.

Read more

12:15pm

Fri September 28, 2012
Regional Coverage

Watertown Airport recieves federal grant for improvements

The Watertown International Airport has seen huge growth in the past year, with a switch from nine-seater to 44-seater planes and direct connections to Chicago. Now the airport will be able to catch up on some overdue infrastructure, with a $2 million grant from the federal government.

Read more

12:12pm

Fri September 28, 2012
Business

Bank Of America To Pay $2.43 Billion In Settlement

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with more fallout from the financial crisis.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more

9:47am

Fri September 28, 2012
Regional Coverage

Syracuse awarded federal grant to fight gang violence

The city of Syracuse is taking some new steps in the fight against gun crime and gang violence. "Syracuse Truce" will bring police and community organizations together to deter crime.

Read more

9:40am

Fri September 28, 2012
Politics and Government

GOP state senator who voted for gay marriage drops out of race

The Republican state senator who lost a primary after voting for gay marriage is dropping out of the race. Senator Roy McDonald says he will not campaign on the Independence Party line in the general election and will instead back his former primary opponent. 

Read more

8:29am

Fri September 28, 2012
Asia

China's Communist Party Expells Disgraced Politician

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A sensational political scandal in China involves murder, abuse of power, and an attempted defection. And the case of senior politician Bo Xilai took another twist today. After months of speculation, it has just been announced that he has been expelled from the Communist Party and will face criminal charges. NPR's Louisa Lim is on the line with us from Beijing, and Louisa, what kind of charges is Bo Xilai going to face?

Read more

7:44am

Fri September 28, 2012
Movies

'Flight': A Few Million Little Creatures That Could

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 10:19 am

"Supergenerations" of monarch butterflies migrate over 2000 miles from Canada to Mexico.
SK Films

A young boy in Canada wondered where butterflies go in the winter — and spent 40 years trying to answer that question.

In 1973, Dr. Fred Urquhart — all grown up by then — placed an ad in a newspaper in Mexico looking for volunteers to tag and observe butterflies and find their destination. A woman named Catalina Aguado and her American husband, Kenneth Brugger, answered that ad. They spent two years searching in remote parts of Mexico.

Read more

6:48am

Fri September 28, 2012
World

Briton Walks On Water In Human Hampster Wheel

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more

6:27am

Fri September 28, 2012
Around the Nation

Candidate's Wife Douses Reporter With Water

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more

4:49am

Fri September 28, 2012
NPR Story

Business News

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

PNC Bank says its website is the latest victim of a denial of service attack. Users who tried to access the bank's websites had trouble loading the pages, or couldn't get into their accounts. But officials say the accounts were not compromised.

4:49am

Fri September 28, 2012
NPR Story

With Senate Control At Stake, Key Wis. Race Tightens

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:39 am

Former Gov. Tommy Thompson in Madison, Wis., ahead of the Aug. 14 Republican primary for Wisconsin's open Senate seat. He was one of four candidates.
Andy Manis AP

One of the most important seats in the battle for control of the U.S. Senate is in Wisconsin, where Democrat Herb Kohl is retiring. Early polls showed popular former Gov. Tommy Thompson might easily flip the seat to the GOP, but he's now trailing Democratic Rep. Tammy Baldwin. It's a race that's going down to the wire in this almost evenly divided state.

Read more

4:49am

Fri September 28, 2012
NPR Story

Syrian Rebels Secure Another Crossing With Turkey

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Rebels in Syria are making slow but steady advances in the north of their country. Last week, they captured a third major border crossing between Syria and Turkey, and they claim to now control a similar border crossing with Iraq. The rebels say it's all part of a strategy to secure a kind of safe zone in the north, as they try to topple the regime of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad.

Read more

4:49am

Fri September 28, 2012
Around the Nation

Obama, Romney Mine For Swing Voters In Ohio

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:15 am

Coal miners listened as GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney spoke during a rally last month in Beallsville, Ohio. Both Romney and President Obama have made the state a focal point of their campaigns.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Undecided voters in Ohio got a lot of attention this week from President Obama and GOP rival Mitt Romney. Coal may be the key to many swing voters in the Buckeye State, which remains a top coal producer.

It's an issue weighing on coal miner Rick Carpenter's mind at the Barnesville Pumpkin Festival in southeastern Ohio.

"Save coal — fire Obama. Yeah, I've got one of those signs in my yard," he says.

Read more

3:30am

Fri September 28, 2012
Books

Put Down Your E-Reader: This Book's Better In Print

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:28 am

"For two days and nights, Odysseus was alone in the wild water. The sea was so rough that he couldn't see beyond the nearest wave. Over and over again, he thought he was going to die."
Neil Packer Candlewick Press

Most people who read a lot have gotten used to reading on a screen, whether it's a laptop, a tablet or an e-reader. Some say they prefer it to the experience of reading a heavy, awkward print version of the book. But every now and then, a book comes along that just seems to insist on being physical — something about it simply can't be transferred to the screen.

Read more

3:28am

Fri September 28, 2012
StoryCorps

Finding Health After Letting Go Of Hate

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:49 pm

Charlie Morris, 91, says he was at school in 1939 when he found out his brother was dead. For 10 years, his hatred consumed him and plagued his body with mysterious ailments. "When I began to forgive, there was all the answers to my illness," he says.
StoryCorps

In 1939, Jessie Lee Bond died. His death certificate says he drowned accidentally, but his family has always maintained that he was lynched after an argument with white shop owners — shot and thrown into the river.

No one has ever been charged with his death.

Decades later, his now-91-year-old brother, Charlie Morris, told StoryCorps in Memphis, Tenn., that he was at school when he was called down to the office and told that his brother had been murdered.

Read more

3:28am

Fri September 28, 2012
Africa

Tunisians Battle Over The Meaning Of Free Expression

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:14 pm

Tunisian artist Nadia Jelassi with two of the sculptures from her exhibit that were attacked by a hard-line Muslim group. Secular Tunisians and Islamists have clashed over multiple issues related to freedom of expression.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Tunisia was the birthplace of the Arab Spring last year, and many regard it as the most Western-looking nation in the Arab world. Yet it's also waging a roaring debate over how to define freedom of expression in an evolving society.

Tunisian protesters attacked the U.S. Embassy recently in response to the anti-Muslim video Innocence of Muslims. This was just the latest of several episodes in which hard-line Muslims have acted out publicly to what they see as attacks on their religion.

Read more

3:24am

Fri September 28, 2012
Economy

Easy Money May Boost Economy But At What Cost?

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:31 pm

Specialist David Pologruto works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 13, as Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke holds a news conference in Washington. The world's central banks are easing credit, putting more money into the global economy.
Richard Drew AP

The world's central banks are pumping cash into their economies, pushing down interest rates in hopes the ready cash and lower rates will boost borrowing and economic activity. Everyone agrees the action is dramatic and unprecedented, but there's disagreement over whether they will do more harm than good.

Economists know very well the trillions of dollars being added by the central banks to the global economy can be risky.

"These are risks about long-term rises in inflation, housing bubbles potentially building up," says Jacob Kirkegaard of the Peterson Institute.

Read more

3:24am

Fri September 28, 2012
Education

Parsing Fact From Fiction In 'Won't Back Down'

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:19 am

Nona Alberts (Viola Davis) and Jamie Fitzpatrick (Maggie Gyllenhaal) share a triumphant moment with Nona's son Cody (Dante Brown) and Jamie's daughter Malia (Emily Alyn Lind).
Kerry Hayes 20th Century Fox

Won't Back Down opens with a little girl's anguished face. It fills the entire screen. The camera hovers as she struggles to read a simple sentence on the blackboard out loud.

She's dyslexic. Not that anyone at Adams Elementary cares — least of all her second-grade teacher, who is berating or slapping kids around when she's not shopping for shoes online.

But if it was your kid who was struggling and nobody at school cared, what would you do? What could you do? That's how director Daniel Barnz hooks you.

Read more

3:22am

Fri September 28, 2012
Space

NASA's Curiosity Finds Water Once Flowed On Mars

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

NASA says it has found proof that water shaped the rocks on the left, in a photograph taken by the Mars rover Curiosity (left). For comparison, the agency released an image of rocks from Earth (right).
NASA

NASA's newest Mars rover, Curiosity, has snapped photos of rocky outcroppings that jut out from the alien soil, and scientists say they look like the remnants of an ancient stream bed where water once flowed on the surface of the red planet.

The exposed rocks look like broken slabs of concrete sidewalk, about four inches thick, and are made of rounded bits of gravel in a sandy matrix. The rock has eroded a little bit, and some of the smooth pebbles — about the size of M&M candies — have fallen down into a little pile.

Read more

11:37am

Thu September 27, 2012
The Upstate Economy

Awards JumpStart opportunities for small businesses in New York

The Cornell Center for Material Research (CCMR) in Ithaca, has announced the winners for the Fall 2012 JumpStart program.

Read more

11:25am

Thu September 27, 2012
Regional Coverage

Stand Against Suicide offers help while increasing awareness

Stand Against Suicide

Some central New Yorkers are taking a Stand Against Suicide. An Elbridge-based organization is trying to raise awareness about the risks of mental illness that can sometimes lead to suicide.

Read more

11:15am

Thu September 27, 2012
Politics and Government

Cuomo endorses candidate across party lines

Governor Andrew Cuomo has crossed party lines and offered a political endorsement to Republican state Senator Roy McDonald, who lost a primary this month after voting to support same sex marriage in 2011.

Read more

11:10am

Thu September 27, 2012
Regional Coverage

Memorial service for homeless woman calls for understanding

Community members in Syracuse attend the memorial service for Michelle Noce, a homeless woman who lived in the area.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The deaths of two homeless people in Syracuse in the last week has put the spotlight on the people who live under bridges and overpasses of central New York. A memorial service for a woman who was found unconscious, and who later died, ended with calls for patience and help for the homeless.

Read more

7:30am

Thu September 27, 2012
Around the Nation

Florida Police Arrest Inebriated Horse Rider

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more

7:20am

Thu September 27, 2012
Around the Nation

Pittsburgh Officials Scold Crosswalk Vigilante

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Somebody in Pittsburgh took the law into his own hands. More precisely, the person took a paintbrush into his own hands. He or she is apparently upset that in 2009 the city denied requests to paint crosswalks in the Polish Hill neighborhood. This unknown person painted unofficial crosswalks. Authorities are publicly scolding the crosswalk vigilante. But by coincidence, they're also promising to install real crosswalks within weeks. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:24am

Thu September 27, 2012
World

Clinton: Al-Qaida May Be Linked To Libya Attack

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has suggested a connection between al-Qaida in North Africa and the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. She did not give any further details on what role the al-Qaida affiliate may have played in the attack

Pages