Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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3:30am

Fri September 28, 2012
Books

Put Down Your E-Reader: This Book's Better In Print

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:28 am

"For two days and nights, Odysseus was alone in the wild water. The sea was so rough that he couldn't see beyond the nearest wave. Over and over again, he thought he was going to die."
Neil Packer Candlewick Press

Most people who read a lot have gotten used to reading on a screen, whether it's a laptop, a tablet or an e-reader. Some say they prefer it to the experience of reading a heavy, awkward print version of the book. But every now and then, a book comes along that just seems to insist on being physical — something about it simply can't be transferred to the screen.

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3:28am

Fri September 28, 2012
StoryCorps

Finding Health After Letting Go Of Hate

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:49 pm

Charlie Morris, 91, says he was at school in 1939 when he found out his brother was dead. For 10 years, his hatred consumed him and plagued his body with mysterious ailments. "When I began to forgive, there was all the answers to my illness," he says.
StoryCorps

In 1939, Jessie Lee Bond died. His death certificate says he drowned accidentally, but his family has always maintained that he was lynched after an argument with white shop owners — shot and thrown into the river.

No one has ever been charged with his death.

Decades later, his now-91-year-old brother, Charlie Morris, told StoryCorps in Memphis, Tenn., that he was at school when he was called down to the office and told that his brother had been murdered.

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3:28am

Fri September 28, 2012
Africa

Tunisians Battle Over The Meaning Of Free Expression

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:14 pm

Tunisian artist Nadia Jelassi with two of the sculptures from her exhibit that were attacked by a hard-line Muslim group. Secular Tunisians and Islamists have clashed over multiple issues related to freedom of expression.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Tunisia was the birthplace of the Arab Spring last year, and many regard it as the most Western-looking nation in the Arab world. Yet it's also waging a roaring debate over how to define freedom of expression in an evolving society.

Tunisian protesters attacked the U.S. Embassy recently in response to the anti-Muslim video Innocence of Muslims. This was just the latest of several episodes in which hard-line Muslims have acted out publicly to what they see as attacks on their religion.

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3:24am

Fri September 28, 2012
Economy

Easy Money May Boost Economy But At What Cost?

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:31 pm

Specialist David Pologruto works at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 13, as Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke holds a news conference in Washington. The world's central banks are easing credit, putting more money into the global economy.
Richard Drew AP

The world's central banks are pumping cash into their economies, pushing down interest rates in hopes the ready cash and lower rates will boost borrowing and economic activity. Everyone agrees the action is dramatic and unprecedented, but there's disagreement over whether they will do more harm than good.

Economists know very well the trillions of dollars being added by the central banks to the global economy can be risky.

"These are risks about long-term rises in inflation, housing bubbles potentially building up," says Jacob Kirkegaard of the Peterson Institute.

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3:24am

Fri September 28, 2012
Education

Parsing Fact From Fiction In 'Won't Back Down'

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:19 am

Nona Alberts (Viola Davis) and Jamie Fitzpatrick (Maggie Gyllenhaal) share a triumphant moment with Nona's son Cody (Dante Brown) and Jamie's daughter Malia (Emily Alyn Lind).
Kerry Hayes 20th Century Fox

Won't Back Down opens with a little girl's anguished face. It fills the entire screen. The camera hovers as she struggles to read a simple sentence on the blackboard out loud.

She's dyslexic. Not that anyone at Adams Elementary cares — least of all her second-grade teacher, who is berating or slapping kids around when she's not shopping for shoes online.

But if it was your kid who was struggling and nobody at school cared, what would you do? What could you do? That's how director Daniel Barnz hooks you.

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3:22am

Fri September 28, 2012
Space

NASA's Curiosity Finds Water Once Flowed On Mars

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

NASA says it has found proof that water shaped the rocks on the left, in a photograph taken by the Mars rover Curiosity (left). For comparison, the agency released an image of rocks from Earth (right).
NASA

NASA's newest Mars rover, Curiosity, has snapped photos of rocky outcroppings that jut out from the alien soil, and scientists say they look like the remnants of an ancient stream bed where water once flowed on the surface of the red planet.

The exposed rocks look like broken slabs of concrete sidewalk, about four inches thick, and are made of rounded bits of gravel in a sandy matrix. The rock has eroded a little bit, and some of the smooth pebbles — about the size of M&M candies — have fallen down into a little pile.

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11:37am

Thu September 27, 2012
The Upstate Economy

Awards JumpStart opportunities for small businesses in New York

The Cornell Center for Material Research (CCMR) in Ithaca, has announced the winners for the Fall 2012 JumpStart program.

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11:25am

Thu September 27, 2012
Regional Coverage

Stand Against Suicide offers help while increasing awareness

Stand Against Suicide

Some central New Yorkers are taking a Stand Against Suicide. An Elbridge-based organization is trying to raise awareness about the risks of mental illness that can sometimes lead to suicide.

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11:15am

Thu September 27, 2012
Politics and Government

Cuomo endorses candidate across party lines

Governor Andrew Cuomo has crossed party lines and offered a political endorsement to Republican state Senator Roy McDonald, who lost a primary this month after voting to support same sex marriage in 2011.

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11:10am

Thu September 27, 2012
Regional Coverage

Memorial service for homeless woman calls for understanding

Community members in Syracuse attend the memorial service for Michelle Noce, a homeless woman who lived in the area.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The deaths of two homeless people in Syracuse in the last week has put the spotlight on the people who live under bridges and overpasses of central New York. A memorial service for a woman who was found unconscious, and who later died, ended with calls for patience and help for the homeless.

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7:30am

Thu September 27, 2012
Around the Nation

Florida Police Arrest Inebriated Horse Rider

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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7:20am

Thu September 27, 2012
Around the Nation

Pittsburgh Officials Scold Crosswalk Vigilante

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Somebody in Pittsburgh took the law into his own hands. More precisely, the person took a paintbrush into his own hands. He or she is apparently upset that in 2009 the city denied requests to paint crosswalks in the Polish Hill neighborhood. This unknown person painted unofficial crosswalks. Authorities are publicly scolding the crosswalk vigilante. But by coincidence, they're also promising to install real crosswalks within weeks. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

5:24am

Thu September 27, 2012
World

Clinton: Al-Qaida May Be Linked To Libya Attack

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has suggested a connection between al-Qaida in North Africa and the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. She did not give any further details on what role the al-Qaida affiliate may have played in the attack

5:19am

Thu September 27, 2012
Sports

Regular NFL Refs Will Be Back On The Job Thursday

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We are pleased to announce this morning that NPR has ended its lockout of Mike Pesca. The network reached a deal with our sports correspondent after his replacement repeatedly confused adjectives with adverbs. OK, that's a joke, but in reality the NFL reached a deal with referees after the replacements made a series of brutally criticized calls. Mike Pesca has been following developments.

Mike, good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: And that was a goodly decision. Oh, wait a minute. I've done it too.

(LAUGHTER)

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4:50am

Thu September 27, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 6:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

There is at least one group of musicians out there who don't seem to have any money problems. Our last word in business is: Kiss. They know what their fans want.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROCK N' ROLL ALL NIGHT" )

KISS: (Singing) I wanna rock and roll all night and party every day. I, wanna rock and roll...

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You know you're moving your head as if you're playing a guitar onstage right now.

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4:50am

Thu September 27, 2012
Politics

How Early Voting Changes The Way People Vote

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 6:22 am

Those who have made up their minds, both Democrats and Republicans, take advantage of early voting. Paul Gronke, a Political Science professor at Reed College, talks to David Greene about who votes early, and how early voting has changed the way people go to the polls. Gronke is Director of the Early Voting Information Center.

4:50am

Thu September 27, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 6:44 am

Kareem Serageldin is accused of hiding mortgage security losses during the financial crisis. He faces extradition to the U.S. A former senior trader for Credit Suisse, Serageldin is the highest level Wall Street executive to be charged in a case related to the 2008 financial meltdown.

4:44am

Thu September 27, 2012
NPR Story

America's Failure To Treat, Prevent Cancer

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 6:37 am

Oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee has written an article in Newsweek about what he calls America's current failure to treat and prevent cancer — and a failure to make funding cancer research a priority. Dr. Mukherjee tells David Greene there is a lag in designing cancer drugs as well as funding cancer research in the U.S.

4:44am

Thu September 27, 2012
NPR Story

Obama Encourages Ohio Supporters To Vote Early

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 7:00 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Renee Montagne is talking with voters in Colorado this morning for our series First and Main.

It is hard to believe but we are finally nearing the end of a presidential campaign that in many ways started back in January 2009.

INSKEEP: Iowa begins early voting today. Other states begin soon, and the presidential candidates are preparing for a final expensive and possibly brutal final act.

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4:44am

Thu September 27, 2012
NPR Story

Romney Also Campaigns In Buckeye State

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 7:12 am

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's swing through Ohio took him from the suburbs of Columbus through parched cornfields and pumpkin patches to industrial corridors near Cleveland and Toledo. Romney says his policies will make things better for struggling Americans.

3:40am

Thu September 27, 2012
Business

In Solyndra's Wake, Solar Company Sees Bright Spot

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 9:59 am

SoloPower is betting it will succeed where others have failed with a $197 million loan from the Department of Energy.
SoloPower/PRNewsFoto AP

A small solar power company hopes to become a winner in a market littered with losers.

San Jose, Calif.-based SoloPower is opening a $60 million manufacturing facility in Portland, Ore., Thursday as it works toward receiving a major government loan — like the one given to now-bankrupt Solyndra. SoloPower thinks it has a strategy to succeed where Solyndra failed.

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3:39am

Thu September 27, 2012
The Salt

New Anti-Obesity Ads Blaming Overweight Parents Spark Criticism

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 4:50 am

A controversial ad by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota shows an overweight shopper and her daughter buying junk food.
courtesy Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota

This week, a new anti-obesity media campaign launched in Minnesota has been getting a lot of attention, and not necessarily the good kind.

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3:38am

Thu September 27, 2012
Research News

Big Quakes Signal Changes Coming To Earth's Crust

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 9:31 am

A prison official examines the damage a day after a powerful earthquake hit the west coast of Indonesia in Banda Aceh on April 12.
Adek Berry AFP/Getty Images

On April 11 of this year, an extraordinary cluster of earthquakes struck off Sumatra. The largest shock, magnitude 8.7, produced stronger ground-shaking than any earthquake ever recorded. And it surprised seismologists by triggering more than a dozen moderate earthquakes around the world.

The quakes are also a sign of big changes to come in the Earth's crust.

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3:37am

Thu September 27, 2012
National Security

Army Seeks To Curb Rising Tide Of Suicides

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 9:04 pm

U.S. troops from the 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment patrol at dawn in Kandalay, Afghanistan on Aug. 4, 2011. A worldwide stand down for troops to take part in suicide prevention training Thursday is part of the Army's response to an alarming suicide rate of nearly one per day.
Romeo Gacad AFP/Getty Images

At Fort Myer, Va., a small Army base across the river from Washington, D.C., Chaplain Mark Worrell is talking to about 100 soldiers, reciting the grim numbers.

"This year, 2012, there have been more suicides in the Army than combat deaths," he says.

Worrell paces in front of the stage in a small auditorium and talks with the soldiers for more than an hour about the warning signs of suicide. He asks them what they would do if a friend starting selling his tools and lost interest in his favorite hobbies.

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12:03am

Thu September 27, 2012
The Record

YouTube Shares Ad Revenue With Musicians, But Does It Add Up?

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 10:04 am

Donna Summer in 1976. YouTube's Chris Maxcy says the company targets advertising to videos by artists like her and gives a share of the revenue from it to the track's label and publisher.
Keystone Getty Images

YouTube is well-known for videos, but a recent Nielsen study revealed 64 percent of teens and young adults go to it to listen to and discover music. The free website, which is owned by Google, has set up advertising deals to help musicians get compensated. But it's not clear how they're getting paid — or how much.

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1:26pm

Wed September 26, 2012
Education

Raising graduation rates will benefit NY economy

Rochester City School District is trying to increase the rate of high school graduates.
Frontline PBS

New York State has similar rates of student disengagement as the rest of the nation.

With dropout rates at almost 30 per cent in New York, the Alliance for Excellent Education warns that this crisis is damaging to the economy as well as the future of individuals.

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10:36am

Wed September 26, 2012
Europe

Greeks Take To Streets In Anti-Austerity Protests

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

People are not getting much work done in parts of Europe. Last night, there were violent protests in Spain. They were protests against austerity measures, which is also the case in Greece, where a nationwide strike came today. It closed businesses and schools, and reporter Joanna Kakissis is following the story from Athens.

Joanna, what's been happening?

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9:57am

Wed September 26, 2012
Politics and Government

"Use It or Lose It" could cause Creekwalk funds slip away

Senator Charles Schumer in Syracuse talking to the press about Creekwalk funds
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The city of Syracuse could be penalized for coming in under-budget in the Creekwalk Project. U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer was in Syracuse Tuesday and promised to try help cut through red tape.

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9:07am

Wed September 26, 2012
Politics

Cuomo says "extremists" challenged pro-gay marriage GOP senators

Both pro- and anti-gay marriage forces are claiming victory after a split primary result in two key state senate races. Meanwhile, Governor Andrew Cuomo says two pro-same sex marriage Republican senators who survived primary challengers were targeted by “extremists” within the GOP.

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7:13am

Wed September 26, 2012
Food

Cheap Cheese Smuggled Across Canadian Border

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 11:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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