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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

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What did President Trump tell Russia's foreign minister?

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Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

There are calls for a criminal investigation of some questionable stipend payments to some New York state senators. One of the senators who received those payments is giving it back, while another is calling the controversy a “witch hunt.”

Several senators who are part of a breakaway group of Democrats known as the Independent Democratic Conference were paid extra stipends — ranging from $12,500 to $18,000 a year — for serving on various Senate committees controlled by the majority party Republicans.

A Binghamton University professor says he's running for Congress because he thinks science and technology is ignored in Washington.

“I am pleased, terrified out of my mind, excited -- I don’t know what you want to call it -- to be running for Congress in New York’s 22nd District," said Patrick Madden, computer science professor, on the Binghamton University campus Monday morning.

Madden is running as a Democrat and hopes to challenge freshman Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-New Hartford) in 2018.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

While the town hall went on inside, protesters vented their frustrations about Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) outside the venue at Onondaga Community College. The rally organized by CNY Solidarity, objected to the rules and random selection of audience members at the town hall.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Monday night, 130 people were allowed in to what Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) labeled a town hall event, televised live by CNY Central’s NBC3/CBS5 television stations last night. 

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Anna Sazonkina never used to go to rallies. The 41-year-old viola teacher and her husband, an oboist, were too busy raising their four boys.

But on Sunday, the couple went out to protest for the first time in their lives, joining thousands rallying in downtown Moscow to save their homes from the wrecking ball.

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And we're going to begin this morning in North Korea. The North has successfully launched yet another missile. It's a missile some say could signal some new technological advances.

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Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Town halls have become the political hot potato for members of Congress ever since Donald Trump became president. Activists have been dogging lawmakers since Trump’s inauguration, and one of their big complaints has been a lack of forums to air out their concern. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

School districts across the state are holding votes on their budgets Tuesday. While almost all of them are keeping their spending requests within the mandatory tax cap, some districts wonder whether the cap is sustainable over the long term.

The property tax cap is now in its sixth year, and according to David Albert with the New York State School Boards Association, most of the state’s nearly 700 school districts are asking for increases that are within the limits of the cap.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Syracuse Common Councilor Joe Nicoletti has won the Democratic Party's designation in the race for the city’s next mayor. Nicoletti will likely have to face a primary in September.

Nicoletti has made several unsuccessful attempts at running for mayor before, but he has insisted that just shows his commitment to Syracuse. Nicoletti has previously said he will work to improve the city’s relationships with the county and state governments if he is elected.

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A new Texas law banning sanctuary cities has outraged Democrats, immigrant advocates and police chiefs. Joining the opposition is a tiny, defiant city on the Mexican border.

El Cenizo is a city that fought for its very existence. It's all of half a square mile, located on the twisting Rio Grande just east of Laredo. It has fewer than 4,000 residents and only eight city employees.

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Green buildings, better workers?

May 12, 2017
Joh739 / Flickr

Companies are always looking for ways to make their employees more productive. Now, a new study shows that making buildings more environmentally friendly, or “green,” can make them healthier for the workers inside -- and improves those workers' cognitive functions. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Piers MacNaughton, an associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment. Dr. MacNaughton was the project manager for the study.

When President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey on Tuesday, Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska was one of several Republicans in Washington voicing concern. As details unfolded throughout the week, Sasse, who sits on the Judiciary Committee, continued to call the timing of the firing "troubling," though he maintains there is not yet a need for an independent investigation or special prosecutor to look into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

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Protests have been steadily building in Caracas, Venezuela — the capital of the once-prosperous, oil-rich nation that's now in economic and political turmoil. Earlier this week, amid the ongoing chaos, a young man named Wuilly Arteaga started playing his violin.

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