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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

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How To Take A Selfie With Your Dog

Oct 2, 2015

When you're trying to take a selfie with your dog, telling your pet to "say cheese" probably won't elicit a smile.

But a tennis ball perched on top of a smartphone is a real attention getter.

The "pooch selfie" is a simple attachment that allows dog owners to attach the fluffy ball.

It's been a hit on Kickstarter. Now to the bigger challenge — getting cats to focus.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency wants your old thermometers or thermostats. It’s an attempt to get mercury out of the waste stream.

If you look at an old thermometer or thermostat hanging around the house and see a ball of silver mercury in it, don’t throw it in the trash. Exposure to even small amounts of mercury can cause health damage to humans and wildlife.

Kathleen Carroll of Covanta, which runs Onondaga County’s trash burner, says they do have pollution controls that minimize the danger of the items containing mercury in the waste stream.

The largest police department in the country is changing the way it deals with the use of force by its officers.

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Kristen Brady was standing in a parking lot yesterday. It was the middle of the morning in Roseburg, Ore. She was chatting with a friend when they heard what they thought was a car backfiring.

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Adam W. / Flickr

Canadian media outlets report that the city of Montreal is suspending its plan to dump over two billion gallons of raw sewage into the St. Lawrence River. This comes after city officials received a stream of phone calls when the city’s plans to dump the wastewater became public.

Rescue Mission

Some big changes are taking place at the Rescue Mission in Syracuse as the organization continues to fight homelessness in central New York.  

A new $7.2 million wing will increase the number of beds for temporary shelter and for the first time, will offer that service to women, according to Rescue Mission CEO Alan Thornton.

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governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

One of the big questions in the wake of the state’s renovation of the New York state fairgrounds near Syracuse, was what will happen to Super Dirt Week once the grandstand and track come down. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, during his "Capital for a Day" visit in Syracuse Wednesday, announced that Oswego County will reap the economic benefits of the popular event.

A Fake Letter About Fake Deer In Wisconsin

Oct 1, 2015

Fake deer snuck into Wisconsin's annual deer count the past two years.

At least according to a letter sent out on Department of National Resources stationary.

Residents were asked to remove deer lawn ornaments so that they wouldn't be included in this years count.

The department took to Facebook on Wednesday to dispute the story, saying the letter is fake.

But many Wisconsinites had fun with it on Facebook.

Including this concern: "What about the very important annual gnome census?"

You know the British slogan: Keep calm, and carry on.

That attitude saw the British through World War II, and Americans through the financial crisis.

But apparently it does not apply when Facebook crashes.

Numerous police departments report receiving calls when the site goes down.

The last time it happened, Britain's Independent noticed that the Kingston police tweeted: please don't call us.

Houston, Texas, police also tweeted an advisory: "We cannot fix Facebook."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Karen Dewitt / WRVO News

A New York comedian, who is also an activist on prison rights issues, is drawing attention to the state’s practice of investing a small amount of its pension fund in the private prison industry.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The commissioner of the New York State Department of Transportation and the former mayor of Syracuse, Matt Driscoll, returned to Syracuse on Wednesday to give an update on the I-81 viaduct project. Engineers are currently analyzing each proposal for the interstate's future.

Driscoll says he is seriously considering three plans: a new viaduct replacement, a community grid with the boulevard option or a tunnel. While each plan has its pros and cons, Driscoll said money should not be a deterrent for any of the options. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul met with the Central New York Regional Economic Development Council on Wednesday to discuss the region's proposal to win a portion of the $1.5 billion Urban Revitalization Initiative competition. Seven regions are competing and three winners will receive $500 million each, which will go towards permanent private sector jobs and investments.

Hochul, who was in Syracuse for the governor's Capital for a Day event, said central New York’s council has made a good effort to reach out to the community for input about its submission.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Syracuse was “Capital for a Day” Wednesday.  That meant the heads of several government agencies fanned out across central New York to talk about everything from opioid addiction to state parks. Gov. Andrew Cuomo was the master of ceremonies, urging the region to focus on the positive.

One of the least expensive insurers on the New York health insurance exchange will be gone by the end of the year. Federal and state regulators intervened to shut down Health Republic Insurance of New York. With about 200,000 enrollees, it’s the fourth and also the largest co-op to get the ax this year.

Spokesperson for the New York State Department of Financial Services, Matt Anderson says the co-op was on the road to insolvency.

"The premiums that they charged simply were too low and didn’t ultimately cover their expenses," said Anderson.

It's a typical morning at the Dupont Veterinary Clinic in Lafayette, La. Dr. Phillip Dupont is caring for cats and dogs in the examining room while his wife, Paula, answers the phone and pet owners' questions. Their two dogs are sleeping on the floor behind her desk.

"That's Ken and Henry," Paula says, pointing to the slim, midsize dogs with floppy ears and long snouts. Both dogs are tan, gray and white, with similar markings. "I put a red collar on Ken and a black collar on Henry so I can tell who's who."

Dog Drives His Owner's Truck Into A Lake

Sep 30, 2015

This could happen to any dog owner. A man in Ellsworth, Maine, walked his Yorkshire terrier.

Which wanted to fight another dog. So the man put his terrier in his truck.

And the dog put the truck in gear.

It started rolling, downhill, 75 feet, into a lake.

And sank in 10 feet of water.

A family friend dove in to rescue the dog, and it's easy to imagine that dog's face - freshly bathed, completely oblivious, wondering where's the food.

Not all was lost in the sinking of the Titanic. And several of its artifacts will be auctioned online Wednesday.

They include a lunch menu offering grilled mutton chops ... and a ticket for the ship's Turkish baths.

Both survived in the pocket of a passenger who jumped into the "Money Boat," a notorious lifeboat taken over by a handful of millionaires who left everybody else behind.

The crumpled menu is expected to sell for $50,000.

At a Catholic Mass at the Magyar Szentek Plébánia church, in a leafy riverside area of Budapest, there is no extra collection for refugees. No canned food drive. No charity bake sale.

This church, like many across Hungary, is caught in the middle of a debate on how to help refugees — or whether even to help at all.

Pope Francis has called on all of Europe's Catholics to take in refugees, but in Hungary, a predominantly Catholic country, church leaders have been hesitant.

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Ellie George, Paradox Lake, NY

If you’re been anywhere near a lake or a river this summer, you may have seen a big white bird diving into the water to catch fish. Ospreys have made a big comeback. But for many years, the bird was threatened. On Wellesley Island, for example,  Ospreys  are everywhere.

Max Klingensmith / Flickr

Teachers say they hope Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s newly appointed education commission will fix problems with the controversial Common Core learning standards. But they say a lot has to change, including the unpopular tests associated with the standards.  

The task force will include educators, teachers, parents, officials from the New York State Education Department and the teacher’s unions,” Cuomo said in a pre-recorded web video.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The American Society of Civil Engineers issued gave New York’s infrastructure and gave an overall grade of C- on its 2015 report card. Syracuse officials hope infrastructure funding will come soon from the state and federal governments.

Larry Goldstein is trying to find drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease. A biologist in cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Goldstein also just started testing something he hopes will enable paralyzed people to walk again.

For both lines of research, he's using cells from aborted fetuses.

"The fetal cells are vital at this time because, to our knowledge, they have the best properties for the kinds of experiments that we need to do," Goldstein says.

On the 18th floor of the Atlanta Financial Center, tech entrepreneurs recently pitched to potential investors over wine and brie.

John Duisberg, co-founder of Cooleaf, which makes a mobile app for employee engagement, tells the crowd he needs $500,000 to double the size of his company. It's got most of that money secured.

Two years ago, it was a different story.