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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand was in North Syracuse on Tuesday and she responded to Sen. Charles Schumer’s decision to vote against the Obama administration’s Iran nuclear deal, which would lift U.S., China, Russia and European Union sanctions on Iran in exchange for limits put on Iran’s nuclear program.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Democratic candidates for Onondaga County Legislature are calling for tougher financial disclosures among elected officials and more accountability to the public. Among the four candidates proposing changes are Kevin Tees, running in the 14th District based in Clay, and Tim Rudd, running for the 15th District in Syracuse.

All four have listed five items they believe the county government can do differently.

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Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There are no issues too small for Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), who is expected to become the next majority leader in the U.S. Senate. Schumer visited central New York Monday to put some heft behind the complaint one small town has against a big corporation.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

As the fourth anniversary of the devastating storms Irene and Lee approaches, the Cuomo administration says it’s more ready than ever for hurricanes, floods, and other adverse weather events .

Since Gov. Andrew Cuomo took office in 2011, there’s been a succession of severe storms, including hurricanes Irene and Lee that brought massive flooding to upstate and Superstorm Sandy in 2012 that flooded beach front communities on Long Island and submerged portions of the New York City subway system in corrosive salt water.

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Primary voting day for New York will be held on a Thursday this year instead of the traditional Tuesday. 

This change is important for the city of Watertown. Voters are expected to choose which mayoral candidates will move onto the general election that day. Watertown city officials hope the date switch won’t keep people from the polls.

With two of the Tuesdays in September falling during the Jewish holidays Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur,  Gov. Andrew Cuomo approved changing the primary voting day to Thursday, September 10. 

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The education programs that serve New York’s prison population are streamlining the path to a college degree. Private organizations offer college classes in 19 state facilities. Now several of the groups have formed a consortium to help students make it to graduation day.

In the past, transfer to a new prison often meant the end of an education for people working on their degrees. Many facilities don’t offer college programs. And even if they do, there are uncertainties: Will credits transfer? Are spots in the program open?

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An advocate for victims of violent crime is asking a provocative question. Danielle Sered wonders, what if the young black men who died in police confrontations in Ferguson and Staten Island had actually survived, alive but injured?

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Ellen Abbott / WRVO News file photo

Workers are putting the finishing touches on a couple of model rooms at the former Hotel Syracuse this week.

Most of the interior of hotel has been taken down to its studs as part of a $57 million dollar renovation. That includes floors two through nine which will be home to 261 rooms in the new Marriott Downtown Syracuse.  

Al Gough, chief financial officer for Hotel Syracuse Restoration, says it’s important to have these model rooms available well before the hotel opening, anticipated next spring.

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been making frequent trips to upstate cities this summer, touting his success in reviving the regions’ faltering economy. But a new report from the New York state comptroller on job creation shows there is still some work to do.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Onondaga County and its biggest union are close to agreeing to a contract. As WRVO’s Ellen Abbott reports, the county and CSEA leadership have agreed to the terms within a fact-finding report from the New York State Employment Relations Board.

The deal includes modest wage increases over five years, and raises health insurance contributions from employees. County Executive Joanie Mahoney says that reflects a changing trend in contracts for government employees, who traditionally were paid less than private sector counterparts, but had better benefits packages.

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Taking a vacation and a break from the stresses of everyday life may seem like a healthy thing to do in and of itself. But recently a new trend has emerged called wellness tourism. It incorporates a range of ways to get healthy while you travel. This week, On WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with journalist Ismat Sarah Mangla of International Business Times. Mangla has written about the growing business of wellness tourism.

An intern at apartmentlist.com wanted to increase the size of his burrito at Chipotle, and he discovered some secrets. First, order a burrito bowl, not a burrito, and get tortillas on the side. Also when you ask for two meats, they split them up but give a bigger overall portion. Same goes for when you get two different kinds of rice and beans. The intern weighed the ingredients back at the office and - voila - he got a burrito 86 percent bigger.

GPS Locates True Greenwich Meridian Line

Aug 14, 2015
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When bioengineer Christina Smolke started her own research lab, she was only 29-years-old. But that didn't stop her from setting colossal goals.

Smolke immediately began to work on what many considered to be a holy grail in bioengineering: yeast that can literally brew narcotic drugs. Achieving that, she knew, could open the door to the quick development of better medications of all sorts.

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U.S. Department of Agriculture

During summer vacation, many low-income kids depend on free lunch programs. Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul visited a summer meal site in Elmira Thursday to talk up state support for such efforts, but programs in rural areas, lilke Chemung County, still struggle with a big challenge.

Kids who participate in the government’s free summer meal program must show up at a designated site during scheduled hours to get their food. That can be a problem in rural areas.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

Syracuse Common Councilor-at-Large Kathleen Joy is negotiating with Mayor Stephanie Miner’s chief of staff Bill Ryan, to settle a lawsuit brought by a majority of common councilors who refused to sign a computer use policy. Those councilors have been without computer access since the beginning of July. A judge rejected a petition from Syracuse councilors to make city officials restore their computer access while the two sides negotiate a new computer use policy.

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