Morning Edition

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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5:29am

Fri June 1, 2012
Business

Exxon Mobil Plans Huge Chemical Facility In Texas

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a new, multibillion-dollar chemical plant.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Exxon Mobil plans to build a huge chemical facility in Baytown, Texas. It reverses a company statement last year that said it has no plans for new chemical factories in the United States. According to Reuters, decades-low natural gas prices made the move too enticing to pass over. Natural gas is a key fuel in chemical production. By using its own natural gas, Exxon Mobil can run a chemical plant relatively cheaply.

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5:29am

Fri June 1, 2012
Around the Nation

Komen Donations Down After Planned Parenthood Dispute

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Susan G. Komen Global Race for the Cure takes place tomorrow here in the nation's capital. It's one of the breast cancer charity's biggest fundraisers. But this year, participation is way down. That follows Komen's controversial decision in February to stop funding Planned Parenthood programs. The decision was quickly reversed, but Komen's supporters worry about the long-term impact, as NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

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5:29am

Fri June 1, 2012
Business

Shilling Blames Rhode Island For Company's Downward Spiral

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 12:01 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's spend some time talking about the big money world of video games. In a moment, what may have been the biggest legal battle ever in the game industry. But first to former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Shilling. He is blaming the governor of Rhode Island for the meltdown of his video game company, 38 Studios. The company's failures have seen almost 400 workers lose their jobs and has Rhode Island taxpayers on the hook for close to $100 million. Ian Donnis of Rhode Island Public Radio has the story.

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5:20am

Fri June 1, 2012
NPR Story

Draghi Warns Euro Framework Is 'Unsustainable'

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene. The financial woes of Greece and other countries of the eurozone, have meant painful austerity measures in exchange for financial bailouts. Now, Irish voters have approved a European Union treaty to battle the debt crisis. It's an effort to enforce strict budget cuts or face financial penalties.

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5:20am

Fri June 1, 2012
NPR Story

'Call Of Duty' Creators Settle Lawsuit Against Activision

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now to an even bigger battle that's been playing in the world of video games.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO GAME)

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5:20am

Fri June 1, 2012
NPR Story

Court Rules Against Part Of Marriage Act

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Friday, it is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

In a unanimous ruling, a federal appeals court has struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act. The First Circuit Court of Appeals, in Boston, ruled the 1996 law unconstitutional because it denies giving gay couples the same rights afforded to heterosexual couples. As NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports, the ruling sets the stage for a potential battle at the U.S. Supreme Court.

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3:00am

Fri June 1, 2012
Iraq

Ignoring Critics, Iraq's Leader Consolidates Power

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 10:30 pm

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki (center) arrives on May 8 at Kirkuk airport in northern Iraq, on his first visit to the multi-ethnic city since taking office.
Marwan Ibrahim AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki recently held one of his traveling Cabinet meetings in the disputed city of Kirkuk in an effort to show Iraqi Arabs on the edge of the Kurdish-controlled north that he's working on their behalf, too.

But the fact that he felt obliged to bring in large numbers of heavily armed troops for the event illustrated the tension plaguing Iraqi politics.

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2:59am

Fri June 1, 2012
Planet Money

A Front-Row Seat At A Bank Run

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Petros Giannakouris ASSOCIATED PRESS

A decade ago, investors thought Greece would flourish on the euro. Money poured in, and banks started lending it out. Thefilos Papacostakis, a bank teller at Alpha Bank in Thessaloniki, got to hand out a lot of that money.

Last month, Thefilos says, his bosses called him in for a meeting. They told him things were about to get worse. When countries are in this kind of trouble, the bosses said, people panic and pull their money out of banks.

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2:57am

Fri June 1, 2012
StoryCorps

When Mom Is Right, And Tells Police They're Wrong

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 1:28 pm

Robert Holmes, 67, is a professor at Rutgers University.
StoryCorps

When Robert Holmes' parents moved to Edison, N.J., in 1956, they were one of the first African-American families to integrate the neighborhood.

"After we'd moved to Edison, there was a resentment that we had broken into the community," Holmes says.

Even at the age of 13, Holmes felt the animosity. The neighborhood had a private swim club that opened up to anyone who participated in the Memorial Day parade. Holmes was in the band.

"I arrived at the pool on Memorial Day having marched in the parade with my uniform still on, and they called the police," he says.

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12:03am

Fri June 1, 2012
Movie Interviews

Andrew Garfield, Disappearing Into Spidey's Suit

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:04 am

Andrew Garfield plays Peter Parker and his superheroic alter ego in The Amazing Spider-Man, Marvel Comics' reboot of the popular superhero film franchise, in theaters July 3.
Sony Pictures

Andrew Garfield is an actor on the verge of superstardom — and he's only 28 years old.

Although Garfield may be best known to American audiences for playing Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin in The Social Network, Garfield started acting in England, where he grew up. There, Garfield made notable turns in the critically acclaimed Red Riding Trilogy as well as in Never Let Me Go, based on the novel by Kazuo Ishiguro.

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11:06am

Thu May 31, 2012
Economy

U.S. Economic Growth Falls Short Of Expectations

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with starts with some discouraging numbers.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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9:29am

Thu May 31, 2012
Regional Coverage

New York to bring back iconic tourism ad campaign

Governor Andrew Cuomo is attempting to revive New York’s iconic "I Love New York" tourism promotion campaign with some new ads.

The governor says the state not been aggressive enough in its promotions in recent years.

The "I Love New York" campaign, with its distinctive logo featuring a red heart, was a major advertising and promotional innovation in the 1970s, when it was created.  In fact, says Governor Cuomo and his top economic development aids, it was too successful, and countless other groups and causes have adapted the now iconic image.

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7:29am

Thu May 31, 2012
Around the Nation

Youngest Speller Eliminated From Competition

Lori Anne Madison has been eliminated from this week's Scripps National Spelling Bee. At six years old, she's the youngest ever to compete.

7:22am

Thu May 31, 2012
Latin America

Brazilian DJ Finds Being Green Isn't Easy

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:33am

Thu May 31, 2012
Around the Nation

Black Voters Feel Targeted By Election Restrictions

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the disputes over voter eligibility extend well beyond Florida. New voter ID laws, and other voting restrictions, have been enacted in a number of states since the last major election. And that has raised special concern among African-Americans, who feel they are being targeted.

Black church leaders and the Congressional Black Caucus met yesterday here in Washington, D.C., to discuss how to make sure African-American voters aren't discouraged from turning out in November.

Here's NPR's Pam Fessler.

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5:21am

Thu May 31, 2012
Pop Culture

Happy Birthday Incredible Hulk

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 6:52 am

Fifty years ago this month, comic book artists Stan Lee and Jack Kirby introduced the Incredible Hulk to the world. The Hulk is the volatile alter ego of Dr. Bruce Banner, a physicist who's inadvertently exposed to radiation. As a result, whenever Dr. Banner gets angry or upset, he transforms into a giant, raging monster, capable of stunning feats of strength.

5:21am

Thu May 31, 2012
Asia

Chinese Security Forces Round Up Tibetan Protesters

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 6:42 am

In recent days, three Tibetans have set themselves on fire to protest Chinese rule. In the past year, it's been reported that more than 30 people have set themselves on fire and most have died. Renee Montagne talks to Robert Barnett, an expert on Tibet, for more on why Tibetans have been protesting Chinese repression by setting themselves on fire.

5:21am

Thu May 31, 2012
Around the Nation

Legislation Could Thwart Return Of Holocaust Art

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 4:20 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Many families who lost artwork during the Holocaust have spent decades trying to reclaim their treasures. Now they could face a new obstacle: proposed legislation that would protect American museums from these families' claims. David Maxon of member station WNYC has more.

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5:21am

Thu May 31, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 7:11 am

Economists had predicted the growth of Asia's third-largest economy would continue to slow this year. But the latest data suggests the Indian economy is in worse shape than many analysts thought. The country's growth in the first quarter of this year was only 5.3 percent, compared to 9.2 percent last year.

5:21am

Thu May 31, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 7:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is: Big Gulp. Actually, make that moderately-sized gulp.

New York City Mayor, Michael Bloomberg has proposed a ban on sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces, which means a large Slurpee or a Grande Frappuccino, would still be legal. Restaurants, movie theaters, and food trucks would all have to abide by the rule, which is aimed at rising obesity rates. Fruit juices and alcoholic drinks would be exempt.

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5:21am

Thu May 31, 2012
Sports

Americans Don't Fare Well Early In French Open

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's only the first week of the French Open tennis tournament and already it has been horrendous for the Americans. When the fading Andy Roddick lost in the first round, that was greeted with shrugs. Much more shocking was when Serena Williams also lost in the first round - the first time she's ever gone out that early in a major. Then yesterday her sister Venus was defeated as well in the second round. Sport Illustrated's Jon Wertheim is one American who's still standing at Roland Garros in Paris.

Jon, good morning.

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3:40am

Thu May 31, 2012
It's All Politics

World War II Vet Caught Up In Florida's Voter Purge Controversy

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 1:56 pm

Bill Internicola, a 91-year-old veteran of World War II, was one of the voters targeted by Florida as a potential noncitizen. Internicola was ordered to prove his citizenship or lose the right to vote. He is flanked by U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, who called on Florida Gov. Rick Scott to stop the purge of voter rolls immediately.
Taimy Alvarez MCT/Landov

Bill Internicola, a 91-yar-old World War II veteran, was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., and now lives in Florida's Broward County. He recently received a letter from county elections officials asking him to show proof he was a U.S. citizen or be removed from the voting rolls.

Internicola says he was "flabbergasted."

"To me, it's like an insult," he says. "They sent me a form to fill out. And I filled out the form and I sent it back to them with a copy of my discharge paper and a copy of my tour of duty in the ETO, which is the European Theater of Operations."

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3:38am

Thu May 31, 2012
The Picture Show

On The Way Back To Base: 'We're Gonna Get Shot At'

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 1:01 pm

Sgt. Kyle Gonzales, a sniper with the 82nd Airborne, smokes a cigarette after a battle near the village of Babaker, Ghazni province. The soldiers have been engaged in gun battles every time they push into the hamlets north of their forward operating base.
David Gilkey NPR

U.S. and Afghan forces are fighting to gain control of a major crossroads in a part of Afghanistan that has seen so few NATO troops that one village elder mistook the Americans for Russians — from the long-ago Soviet war.

"It's an absolutely crucial area," says NPR photographer David Gilkey, who has been embedded with U.S. troops involved in the offensive in eastern Afghanistan's Ghazni province.

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3:36am

Thu May 31, 2012
Election 2012

The Fine Political Art Of Jobs Forecasting

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 8:17 am

A sign outside a McDonald's restaurant in Chesterland, Ohio, advertises job openings earlier this month.
Amy Sancetta AP

Friday is jobs day, when the federal government releases its monthly unemployment report. It's also just about five months before the presidential election.

When the two presidential contenders talk about unemployment, they're trying to balance their rhetoric between optimism, pessimism and reality.

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3:28am

Thu May 31, 2012
Music News

Requiem For A Cabaret: The Oak Room Closes

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 5:21 am

The entrance to the Algonquin Hotel on West 44th Street in New York City.
Peter Kramer Getty Images

New York's historic Algonquin Hotel has been famous for a lot of things: the roundtable where some of the greatest American wits, from George S. Kaufman to Dorothy Parker, held forth in the 1920s and '30s; generations of cats — named either Hamlet or Matilda — who haunt the lobby; and, since 1980, the Oak Room, one of New York's most loved cabaret spaces.

When Marriott purchased the hotel and closed it for renovations early this year, they announced that the Oak Room would not be reopening — instead, it will be a lounge for preferred customers.

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3:27am

Thu May 31, 2012
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Queen's Jubilee

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 6:18 pm

Queen Elizabeth II arrives for an event with The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, in London on Wednesday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call "Word of Mouth." This month, Brown shares reading recommendations on Queen Elizabeth II and the royal family. The Diamond Jubilee takes place over the weekend, marking 60 years of the queen's reign in Britain.

A Queen At 25

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2:54am

Thu May 31, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

As Psychiatric Wards Close, Patients Languish In Emergency Rooms

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 7:45 am

HealthOne is a Colorado hospital chain that is opening a psychiatric ward to take pressure off its hospitals' emergency rooms, including the one on the billboard.
Eric Whitney/CPR

Last fall, Kathy Partridge got a phone call from a local emergency room, telling her that her daughter, Jessie Glasscock, was there — and was OK.

Glasscock had gone missing overnight. She was away at college, and had a history of manic episodes. Police had found her in a Dumpster and brought her to the ER for her own safety. It was a huge relief for her mother. But she was completely surprised by what happened next.

"I went down to this emergency room and just found her by herself, basically locked in a closet," says Partridge.

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2:52am

Thu May 31, 2012
Youth Radio

Matchmaker, Matchmaker, Find Me A Part-Time Job

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 5:21 am

An image from the TaskRabbit website shows one of the company's workers assembling a piece of furniture — a task the site says will pay $45.
NPR

The unemployment rate is 8.1 percent, but the underemployment rate — that's people who work part time but want full-time work — is much higher. For many people, making ends meet means cobbling together various part-time jobs. And there are some apps for that.

Shannon Mills has blanketed the floor in a spacious home in Corte Madera, Calif., with protective plastic. Now she's taping off the trim, getting ready to paint over the peach-colored living room walls with the more neutral "bisque" shade waiting in cans at her feet.

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2:51am

Thu May 31, 2012
Europe

Stumbling Upon Miniature Memorials To Nazi Victims

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 8:59 am

Brass bricks known as Stolperstein, or "stumbling stones," in front of a home in Raesfeld, Germany, where five members of a single family were forcibly removed by the Nazis. Across Germany, the stones commemorate the millions of victims of the Nazi regime.
Jeffrey Katz NPR

Brick by brick, Guenther Demnig is working to change how the Holocaust is publicly remembered in Germany.

On a recent afternoon, the 62-year-old Berlin-born artist is on his knees on a sidewalk in a prosperous section of Berlin's Charlottenburg district, working a hammer and small trowel. He is installing dozens of small, square brass bricks, each one inscribed with the name — and details about the death of — people who once lived in apartment houses on Pestalozzi Strasse.

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11:02am

Wed May 30, 2012
Health

Needle exchange program gives options to individuals in Syracuse

The needle exchange program van.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

All of New York state is now covered by a needle exchange program sponsored by the state health department.

Syracuse was one of the last communities to join the  program, and so far, it's working well.

The program's big silver van has a small sign that says, “Safety First: Syringe Exchange Program.” This is where IV drug users and others can exchange their dirty needles for  clean ones.

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