Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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5:04am

Mon July 30, 2012
Technology

Samsung Fight Among Many In Apple's Patent War

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:01 am

Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S (left) and Apple's iPhone 4 are displayed at the headquarters of South Korean mobile carrier KT. Apple claims some of Samsung's designs violate its patents.
Ahn Young-joon AP

An epic battle between the two biggest smartphone makers begins Monday in a federal district court in San Jose, Calif., where computing giant Apple is asking for more than $2.5 billion from rival phone maker Samsung for patent violations.

The suit would be the most expensive patent violation in history, and it's just one front in Apple's war against phones running Google's Android operating system.

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4:58am

Mon July 30, 2012
Crime In The City

Writer Has A Down-Home Feel For Atlanta's Dark Side

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 8:24 am

Writer Karin Slaughter has seen the fallout of some of Atlanta's most gruesome crimes and most dramatic transitions.
David Goldman AP

Best-selling crime novelist Karin Slaughter (yes, that's her real name) grew up just south of Atlanta in the 1970s and '80s, when the city saw some of its most gruesome crimes: A rash of child murders in which dozens of African-American children disappeared, their bodies turning up in nearby woods and rivers. The realization that horrid crimes can happen even to children changed Slaughter's life.

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4:58am

Mon July 30, 2012
Book Reviews

A Portrait Of A Country Awash In 'Red Ink'

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 5:15 pm

As the federal debt balloons, reducing it would seem more and more pressing. Yet policymakers remain far apart. Debt, deficit and budget rhetoric is often accompanied by numbers cherry-picked to support a particular political view.

But a new book by Wall Street Journal economics writer David Wessel lays out the numbers that both political parties face.

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10:33pm

Sun July 29, 2012
Poetry Games

'Lifting,' And Lifted By, Words

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 10:13 am

Ron Tanovitz

Poet Ouyang Yu comes to NPR's Poetry Games representing two continents: Asia, where he was born (in China); and Australia, where he moved in 1991. He is a prolific writer of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, literary translation and criticism in English and Chinese.

Of his poem "Lifting," he writes: "Much as I admire weightlifting heroes or heroines, I can't help reminding myself that, however powerful a weightlifter is, he or she can't lift himself or herself up. The magic of the word is that, when well lifted, it has the power to transform."

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11:44am

Fri July 27, 2012
The Salt

McDonald's Food Has A Healthy Glow, At Least In China

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 11:34 am

Tomatoes getting a splash of water reinforces the notion that McDonald's food is wholesome in China, as seen in this video screengrab.
McDonald's China

Here in the U.S., McDonald's food is not usually considered all that healthy. But in China, it is.

That's because Chinese consumers trust American brands more than their own, says Shaun Rein, founder of China Market Research, who studies Chinese consumer behavior. Rein says that in China, McDonald's is seen as providing safe and wholesome food.

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8:30am

Fri July 27, 2012
Regional Coverage

Community meetings take aim at “bath salts” drugs

Jefferson County Sheriff's Detective David Pustizzi speaks to dozens of community members gathered at South Jefferson High School in Adams on Wednesday.

Community meetings are popping up as fast as the bizarre stories surrounding a drug known as bath salts or glass cleaner. The drugs are sold in head shops and convenience stores – they are not typical bath products or window cleaners. Three meetings in Jefferson County this week aimed to address the growing drug problem.

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7:44am

Fri July 27, 2012
Strange News

Freed Inmate Re-Incarcerated For Refusing To Leave

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 11:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer with the opposite of a jailbreak. Rodney Dwayne Valentine was released from jail. He asked police officers for a ride to a motel and the officers said no. They told him to call a cab. Instead, Valentine decided to stay put. He refused to leave the jail. The Greensboro News and Record reports that Valentine was then arrested for trespassing. He's back in the slammer. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:44am

Fri July 27, 2012
Sports

Olympic Gymnasts Take The (Hot Pink) Floor

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 11:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

As the U.S. men's gymnastics team struggles to adjust to the London arena, where they will compete, they're thinking more about pink than gold. That's because the competition floor is covered in hot pink. In a room Barbie would love, the men's team says it's not about gender norms but rather an array of colors making it hard to spot the high bars. As one gymnast put it, real men do compete on pink floors.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

1:13am

Fri July 27, 2012
AIDS: A Turning Point

Greece's Latest Crisis: Rising HIV Cases

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 11:58 am

Nurse Maria Vatista draws blood from a Greek drug addict for an HIV test in a mobile testing van in Athens last year. HIV infection rates are rising, as Greece's financial crisis has led the government to cut health and social services, including a successful needle exchange program.
Yannis Behrakis Reuters/Landov

One of the alarming consequences of the financial crisis in Greece appears to be a sharp rise in the rate of HIV infection.

The country, which is struggling through a historic debt crisis and a deep recession, still has one of the lowest HIV infection rates in Europe. But budget cuts to health and social services seem to be driving a recent and dramatic increase, especially among injecting drug users.

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1:13am

Fri July 27, 2012
Planet Money

How To Set Up An Offshore Company

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 2:51 pm

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Setting up an offshore company in a tax haven is surprisingly easy. A simple Google search offers up thousands of companies willing to help you do it.

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1:13am

Fri July 27, 2012
Poetry

Honoring The Games, And The Past, With Poetry

Originally published on Sun July 29, 2012 10:34 pm

Ron Tanovitz

In the days of the ancient Greeks, poetry and sport went hand in hand at athletic festivals like the Olympics. Poets sang the praises of athletic champions and, at some festivals, even competed in official events, reciting or playing the lyre. Here at NPR, we're reviving that tradition with our own Poetry Games.

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1:13am

Fri July 27, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama Would Pay More — Romney, A Lot More — If Bush-Era Tax Cuts End

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 3:42 pm

President George W. Bush signs tax cut legislation on June 7, 2001. The cuts from this and a subsequent bill are set to expire at the end of 2012.
Stephen Jaffe AFP/Getty Images

An occasional series, Fiscal Cliff Notes breaks down the looming "fiscal cliff" of expiring tax cuts and deep automatic spending cuts set to hit around the first of year.


About 80 percent of Americans would see their taxes go up if all the tax cuts signed into law by President George W. Bush were to expire as scheduled at the end of this year. And nearly 100 percent of the highest income earners would have to pay more — including both the Obamas and the Romneys.

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1:13am

Fri July 27, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

GOP Says Coverage For The Uninsured Is No Longer The Priority

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 11:44 am

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says covering the uninsured shouldn't be Republicans' top health priority.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

For decades, the primary goal of those who would fix the U.S. health system has been to help people without insurance get coverage. Now, it seems, all that may be changing. At least some top Republicans are trying to steer the health debate away from the problem of the uninsured.

The shift in emphasis is a subtle one, but it's noticeable.

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4:45pm

Thu July 26, 2012
Science

Scientists uncover hidden history of polar bears

Scientists now believe polar bears have existed for over four million years, having endured many periods of climate change before.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Public domain

It all started with a fossil.

“We have this polar bear jawbone from the Svalbard archipelago in the North Atlantic,” says Charlotte Lindqvist, a professor at SUNY Buffalo and lead author of a landmark new study into the history of polar bears.

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10:35am

Thu July 26, 2012
Asia

China Charges Bo Xilai's Wife In British Man's Killing

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

China announced today that it is prosecuting the wife of a disgraced party official for the murder of a British man. It's the latest sensational twist in the country's biggest political scandal in decades. NPR's Louisa Lim joins us now from Beijing. Louisa, could you bring us up to speed on this scandal and what the latest news is?

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9:23am

Thu July 26, 2012
Regional Coverage

Watertown airport reaches 10,000 passenger milestone

Passengers wait for a 7 a.m. flight to Chicago at the Watertown International Airport.
Joanna Richards/WRVO

Watertown International Airport swapped its 9-seater flights to Albany for 44-seater flights to Chicago back in November. So far, passengers and officials seem to agree it's been a big success.

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9:05am

Thu July 26, 2012
Regional Coverage

Veterans Job Corp. would employ vets for one year

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) stumps for veterans' employment programs during a trip to Syracuse in May.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

As veteran unemployment hovers above the national average, some lawmakers are pushing for the creation of a Veterans Job Corp.

Democrat Senator Charles Schumer from New York says the veteran corp. would be similar to the already established AmeriCorp program.

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7:28am

Thu July 26, 2012
Strange News

It's State Fair Season; What's On The Menu?

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 10:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It's the start of state fair season, which means lots of weird and fried food. The Indiana State Fair decided on spaghetti and meatballs ice cream as the fair's official food. The noodles are made of gelato, the sauce is strawberry tomato, and the meatballs are chocolate. It's topped with shredded white chocolate cheese. Yummy. At the Iowa State Fair you can try a double bacon corndog. Last year, Iowa featured deep fried butter. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

7:28am

Thu July 26, 2012
Strange News

'Lucky Larry' The 17-Pound Lobster Goes Free

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 10:35 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Lucky Larry is a 17-pound lobster estimated to be at least 70 years old. He was not so lucky when he was trapped and sold to a restaurant in Connecticut. But Don MacKenzie stepped in. He bought Lucky Larry, but not for a dinner date. He sent him back out to sea. For a lobster to live this long and avoid traps, MacKenzie said, he does not deserve a bib and butter. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

4:45am

Thu July 26, 2012
Planet Money

Meet The Drug Dealer Who Helps Addicts Quit

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 7:56 am

Suboxone is used in the treatment of opiate dependence.
Drugs.com

A prescription drug called Suboxone helps wean people off of heroin and pain pills, but addicts have a hard time getting prescriptions. So they're turning to the black market.

An Albuquerque man who goes by the name Mystery Man has stepped in to fill the void. He says he illegally sells Suboxone every day.

To get Suboxone, Mystery Man has to find a patient with a Suboxone prescription, and give that person the $50 co-pay to fill it. He gets that money by selling, among other things, crack and guns.

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4:16am

Thu July 26, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Treating Everybody With HIV Is The Goal, But Who Will Pay?

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 10:35 am

The big question hanging over the International AIDS Conference this week is whether all 34 million people in the world with HIV can possibly get antiviral drug treatment.

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4:10am

Thu July 26, 2012
Television

At Bravo, A Pop-Culture Kingpin Works Day And Night

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 10:35 am

Andy Cohen on the set of his nightly Bravo talk show, Watch What Happens: Live. Cohen is also Bravo's executive vice president of development and talent, and has helped make Bravo a pop-culture heavyweight.
Heidi Gutman Bravo

Andy Cohen has been yakking for most of his 44 years. He has a book titled Most Talkative — a title he earned in high school.

"My mouth has been my greatest asset and also my biggest Achilles' heel," he says.

Most days, it's an asset.

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4:09am

Thu July 26, 2012
Asia

In Pakistan, Sounds Of A Different Kind Of Drone

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 10:35 am

Ibrahim Ahmad, the son of the owner of the Imperial Bagpipe Manufacturing Co., tests a bagpipe at a factory in Sialkot, Pakistan. The Pakistani city is the largest producer of the instruments most commonly associated with Scotland.
Farooq Naeem AFP/Getty Images

Bagpipes and Scotland? Aye, it's a natural association: Played for centuries, the instrument is especially identified with the Scottish military and traditional Scottish dress, tartan kilts and shawls.

But bagpipes and Pakistan? Nae, you say? Think again.

Turns out no place in the world manufactures more bagpipes than Pakistan. And no city in Pakistan makes more of them than Sialkot.

Bagpipe Central

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10:39am

Wed July 25, 2012
Politics

Parties shy away from challenging incumbent lawmakers

It can be tough to unseat an incumbent lawmaker in New York.

That's why both parties are having a tough time this year finding people to run for the state Legislature.

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9:51am

Wed July 25, 2012
Technology

Climbing robots take on dangers of high-elevation work

International Climbing Machines president Sam Maggio demonstrates his company's climber.
Matt Richmond Innovation Trail/WSKG

International Climbing Machines (ICM) has its headquarters in a shabby warehouse on the outskirts of Ithaca.

The workshop is hardly bigger than a three-car garage. Metal shelves filled with spare parts line the walls, and in one corner there’s enough space for company president Sam Maggio to show off his device.

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7:54am

Wed July 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Prevention Programs Curb New HIV Infections In South Africa

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 2:03 pm

Health care workers in South Africa speak to residents during a door-to-door AIDS awareness campaign, part of a series of prevention efforts that has helped lower the country's HIV infection rate.
Mujahid Safodien Reuters /Landov

The statistics on HIV and AIDS in South Africa are daunting.

In a country of 50 million people, more than 5.5 million people are living with HIV and almost 2 million people are on HIV drug treatment. Each year, roughly 300,000 more South Africans are infected with HIV, and half a million come down with tuberculosis.

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7:36am

Wed July 25, 2012
Strange News

Survey Shows Londoners Are A Crabby Bunch

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 8:12 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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7:33am

Wed July 25, 2012
Strange News

Joggler To Make World Record Attempt

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 8:12 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Matthew Feldman won't be competing in the Olympics, but he'll be trying to break a record this Friday in joggling. That's what it sounds like: juggling while jogging. He's trying to run one mile, continuously juggling five objects. He broke the Guinness world record in practice, and if he doesn't drop the ball Friday, he can make it official. But there are no gold medals for joggling so far. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:56am

Wed July 25, 2012
U.S.

Plant Pleads To Stay Afloat, But Army Says 'No Tanks'

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 5:39 pm

M1 Abrams tanks sit on the assembly line at a plant in Lima, Ohio, the only place where the tanks are manufactured. Plant and local officials fear the plant won't survive if the military temporarily halts new tank orders.
General Dynamics Land Systems

M1 Abrams battle tanks are the rock stars of military armor. They're made in only one place: Lima, Ohio. The Army says it's done ordering them, but Congress appears intent on spending millions for more, arguing that cutting production is bad for the economy and national security.

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4:56am

Wed July 25, 2012
Afghanistan

Taliban's 'Summer Offensive' Heats Up In Afghanistan

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 8:12 am

A Spanish NATO soldier on patrol in Afghanistan. Insurgents in the country have been busier this summer than last, and more often than not, civilians are paying the price.
Sean Carberry NPR

NATO officials were hoping that insurgent activity in Afghanistan would taper off during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, but so far, insurgents appear to be pressing ahead with their summer offensive.

More than a dozen NATO troops and contractors have been killed since the beginning of Ramadan last Friday. In general, insurgents have been busier this summer than last, and more often than not, civilians are paying the price.

Read more

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