Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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4:30am

Mon July 16, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's stay in the land of milk and honey, because our last word in business takes us to a barnyard venture that is solving to very old problems at once. The first is keeping unwanted plants out of a productive vegetable garden. The second, more existential problem is finding a suitable romantic partner. And the last word is weed dating.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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4:30am

Mon July 16, 2012
Analysis

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Monday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama will be in the swing state of Ohio again today. He'll be holding his first big town hall meeting of the campaign in Cincinnati. And the president will likely continue his campaign attack against Mitt Romney's record of what Democrats characterize as sending jobs overseas while he was the head of Bain Capital. Over the weekend, the president said he would not apologize for those attacks.

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4:30am

Mon July 16, 2012
Middle East

Syrian Violence Escalates Into Civil War

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 7:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across the border in Syrian, reports of clashes between the army and rebels overnight in a neighborhood in Damascus. It was some of the heaviest fighting so far in the capital, according to residents and activists who say the army for the first time bombarded one neighborhood with mortars.

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3:29am

Mon July 16, 2012
Business

In Bankruptcy, American Airlines Looks At All Options

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 7:30 am

Will American emerge from bankruptcy as a stand-alone airline, or will it merge with US Airways? An American spokesman says it's considering all options.
Matt Rourke AP

Imagine going into bankruptcy with billions of dollars in cash still in your bank account. That's what American Airlines did last November. The thinking was that management would gut the company's pensions and union contracts and emerge from bankruptcy ready to compete.

But then US Airways said it could take over American and be profitable, and it wouldn't have to hurt American's employees nearly as bad in the process. American's pilots, mechanics and flight attendants loved that idea.

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3:26am

Mon July 16, 2012
Business

Bucking Bulls Draw Crowds, And Dollars

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 5:04 pm

Bulls are judged with a "dummy" weight for four seconds to see how hard they will jump and twist to buck a rider. Bulls that do well can sell for up to $50,000.
Laura Ziegler KCUR

The bucking bull has long been the embodiment of the American rodeo, and it takes just four seconds for a strong young bull to reap its owner as much as $50,000 in prize money.

Four seconds is how long each 1- or 2-year-old bull will wear a weight strapped to its back as the massive animal is judged on how high it kicks and how much it twists.

In the past 10 years, bucking bulls have become a major industry. The price of the best bloodlines can soar to $250,000, and competitions take place everywhere from Madison Square Garden to Wyoming.

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3:25am

Mon July 16, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Is HIV Still A Death Sentence? Young People Weigh In

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 8:11 am

Young activists distribute condoms at an AIDS awareness event in Ashbury Park, N.J.
Charles Sykes AP

Think of this like a snapshot — a few perspectives of HIV-negative 20-somethings.

To start, we posted the following query on NPR's Facebook page:

"Thirty years ago, a positive HIV status was considered a death sentence. As treatments for the disease have advanced over the past three decades, we're wondering how younger people view the disease today."

Hundreds of people e-mailed and commented with their reactions. We also gathered reactions from young folks we met on the street.

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8:52pm

Sun July 15, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Thriving Gut Bacteria Linked To Good Health

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 10:19 am

Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables is important for gut health, especially in aging adults.
iStockphoto.com

There's no magic elixir for healthy aging, but here's one more thing to add to the list: good gut health.

A study published in the latest issue of Nature finds diet may be key to promoting diverse communities of beneficial bacteria in the guts of older people.

To evaluate this, researchers analyzed the microbiota, or gut bacteria, of 178 older folks, mostly in their 70s and 80s.

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7:01am

Sun July 15, 2012
Science

SU scientists say fireflies could be a light source

There's more to fireflies than a backyard light show.  Scientists at Syracuse University are working on a project that ultimately would put the insect's luminescense to use.

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3:02pm

Fri July 13, 2012
Regional Coverage

Anti-nuclear "peace walk" begins

The potential for disaster at nuclear power plants is the message of a "peace walk" that will take place around Lake Ontario and started this week in Onondaga County.

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9:30am

Fri July 13, 2012
Environment

Voyage studying plastic in Great Lakes sets sail

A ship of scientists and students will study plastic waste in Lakes Huron, Superior and Erie this summer. The voyage will be led by Sherri Mason [above], a SUNY Fredonia professor.
Daniel Robison Innovation Trail/WBFO

Until now, scientists could only guess at the amount of plastic waste in the Great Lakes.

This week, a team of researchers sets sail to conduct the first-ever survey of plastic pollution in the world’s largest fresh water system.

“You really have to start with, ‘Is this even an issue in the Great Lakes?  [With] 35 million people living around the Great Lakes, all the plastic you see blowing around, common sense is that it’s out there,” says Sherri “Sam” Mason, professor within SUNY Fredonia’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

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9:14am

Fri July 13, 2012
Regional Coverage

Employment of disabled big concern as ADA turns 22

The disabled community in central New York this week celebrates the 22nd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  While there have been so many successes in the fight for equal access for the disabled, there is still work to be done.

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8:53am

Fri July 13, 2012
Politics and Government

Cuomo's endorsements of state senators remain up in the air

Governor Andrew Cuomo says he will not necessarily endorse Democrats for election to the closely divided New York state Senate, even though he’s a Democrat. He says he’ll consider candidates on a case by case basis. That stance gives the politically savvy governor a number of options.

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7:48am

Fri July 13, 2012
Business

JPMorgan: Trading Loss Grows To $4.4 Billion

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:23 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The largest bank in the U.S., JPMorgan Chase, this morning released its second quarter results. It's net income was $5 billion, but it turns out that loses in a failed hedging strategy involving a secretive trader were much higher than what the bank originally said the loss would be. In fact, JPMorgan lost $4.4 billion last quarter on those risky trades.

As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, that's not the full extent of the firm's damage.

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7:24am

Fri July 13, 2012
Around the Nation

Surfing Goats Amaze California Beachgoers

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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7:18am

Fri July 13, 2012
World

Lebanese Tire Of Protesters Using Tires

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. People in Beirut are sick of political protests across the country. Protesters have been blocking highways with burning tires. So there was only one thing to do. Yesterday, they held a protest using tires against protests using tires. Instead of burning the tires in the street, they painted the tires many colors. The protesters held up signs reading: We are tired. And a police officer refused to ticket them, saying, their tires are pretty. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:53am

Fri July 13, 2012
Books

Original Fiction In All The 'Shades' Of Fandom

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 10:17 am

courtesy of Vintage/Anchor Books

This Friday the 13th, fans of horror films and hobbits, science fiction and fantasy are descending upon the San Diego Convention Center. They're gathering for the annual explosion of pop culture fandom that is Comic-Con. One of the biggest phenomena in pop culture at the moment will be making an appearance, and it's not a man of steel or a boy slinging webs.

It's a 40-something woman who writes... wait for it... steamy romance.

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6:00am

Fri July 13, 2012
Asia

China's Economy Slows To 3-Year Low

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renée Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. China's economic growth has slowed down to a three-year low. That's according to new figures released today. The numbers matter to us because of the way the world economy is so interconnected. Americans import a lot from China, sure, but have also been working to boost exports to other nations, including China.

NPR's Louisa Lim joins us from Beijing to make sense of the latest news. Hi, Louisa.

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5:09am

Fri July 13, 2012
Africa

Al-Qaida-Linked Group Infiltrates Timbuktu

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

The ancient desert town of Timbuktu is under assault in the west African nation of Mali. Islamist forces have taken over much of northern Mali where Timbuktu is located. One group, allied with al-Qaida, has begun systematically destroying Shrines that celebrate ancient Muslim saints. Human Rights Watch Senior Researcher Corinne Dufka talks to Renee Montagne about the destruction.

5:09am

Fri July 13, 2012
Business

JPMorgan To Reveal Earnings, Trading Losses

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 2:26 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the biggest bank in the U.S., JPMorgan Chase, says it has lost $4.4 billion from its failed hedging strategy involving a secretive trader. That's more than twice the bank's earlier estimate. The company released its second-quarter earnings report this morning, and NPR's Jim Zarroli is with us now to talk about them. Jim, what is the company telling investors this morning about that money?

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5:09am

Fri July 13, 2012
Business

Team USA Predicted To Take The Most Medals

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some future news now. The Olympics begin two weeks from today in London, and we can already tell you the likely big winners. China will take the most gold medals, followed by the U.S. and host country, Great Britain. Team USA will win the most overall medals, followed by China and Russia.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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5:09am

Fri July 13, 2012
Business

Uzbekistan Sets Up Rival To Facebook

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business comes from the Central Asian country of Uzbekistan, which by the way, won six medals in the last Olympics. But today's last word is about another kind of competition, this one between social networking sites. And the word is: YouFace. That's the name of a new social networking site that aims to lure local Internet users away from Facebook, and, quote, "boost patriotism among young people in Uzbekistan."

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3:22am

Fri July 13, 2012
StoryCorps

A Small Town's Post Office, And Its 'Squire'

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 10:17 am

Freddie Wood stands at the counter of the Wood & Swink general store in Evinston, Fla.
StoryCorps

This month, the U.S. Postal Service begins cutting back hours and services at rural post offices across the country. One store facing changes sits inside the Wood & Swink general store in the northern Florida town of Evinston. The store has been in Freddie Wood's family for more than 100 years. In that time, it's gone through only small changes.

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3:20am

Fri July 13, 2012
Humans

In Ancient Ore. Dump, Clues To The First Americans?

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 10:16 am

Displayed in the hand of University of Oregon archaeologist Dennis Jenkins are three bases for western stemmed projectiles from the Paisley Caves in Oregon. The bases date to some 13,000 years ago.
Jim Barlow Science/AAAS

Some of the most interesting discoveries in archaeology come from sifting through ancient garbage dumps. Scientists working in Oregon have found one that has yielded what they say are the oldest human remains in the Americas and a puzzle about the earliest American tools.

Early Americans used Oregon's Paisley Caves for, among other things, a toilet. Little did they know that scientists would be picking through what they left behind.

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3:20am

Fri July 13, 2012
Crisis In The Housing Market

County Considers Eminent Domain As Foreclosure Fix

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 11:04 am

Half of San Bernardino County's 300,000 mortgages are underwater. In an attempt to ease the mortgage crisis, the Southern California county is considering taking control of some of those properties by eminent domain.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

County and city officials in San Bernardino, Calif., are considering a controversial plan: using the power of eminent domain to take over "underwater" mortgages, where the value of the home is worth less than the original loan. Taking on those properties, officials say, would allow the homeowners to refinance those troubled loans.

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5:03pm

Thu July 12, 2012
Movie Reviews

Whatever The Country, No Such Thing As 'Easy Money'

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 9:57 am

Mrado (Dragomir Mrsic) is the enforcer for a Serbian drug cartel that controls business in Sweden, and one of three characters who clash in Easy Money.
Weinstein Company

Easy Money is a fine title for a film, but to truly savor the tang of this top-drawer Scandinavian thriller, try rolling its original Swedish title off your tongue. Say hello to Snabba Cash.

Director Daniel Espinosa starts his splendid crime story all in a rush, throwing us right into the middle of a trio of chaotic situations.

Introduced first is Jorge, a Chilean living in Sweden — in fact in a Swedish prison. Making his escape, Jorge promptly goes into hiding, as much from other local bad guys as from the police.

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9:51am

Thu July 12, 2012
Politics and Government

Business coalition opposes proposed Thruway toll hike

Jacob Enos Flickr

A coalition of business groups is opposing a proposed 50 percent toll hike for trucks on the New York State Thruway, saying it will have a drastic impact on manufacturing, farming, and many other industries.    

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9:26am

Thu July 12, 2012
Around the Nation

Man Tries To Benefit From Fake Cat's Death

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 12:21 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Prosecutors say no cats were harmed in the making of this news story. A man in Tacoma, Washington told a sad tale. He was involved in a car crash and two years later he said that collision had killed his cat named Tom. He filed a $20,000 insurance claim. But now, according to KOMO, he's been accused of fraud. Authorities say the cat never existed. The man allegedly backed up his claim with cat photos from the Internet. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

9:24am

Thu July 12, 2012
World

Giant Mushroom Found In British Columbia

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 12:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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9:21am

Thu July 12, 2012
Regional Coverage

Grocery access to improve for one Syracuse neighborhood

Ivy Dawned Flickr

Grocery shopping will soon be easier for residents of one south side Syracuse neighborhood.  The announcement of a new grocery store in the Valley Plaza solves one problem, but others still exist in Syracuse when it comes to the access to affordable food.

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8:56am

Thu July 12, 2012
Politics and Government

Cuomo on campaign finance reform

Governor Andrew Cuomo says he is starting a new effort to push campaign finance reform in New York’s elections.

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